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Great Rural MoneySaving Hunt

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  • zarazara
    zarazara Posts: 2,264 Forumite
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    Thanks for bumping the thread.Lots of good advice on it. reburning cowpats , i dont think they actually get dry enough in this country to burn effectively.
    I'm becoming more and more self-suffiecient but an a long way off yet, I think
    I'vve heard of root stores being dug in the ground, rather like air raid shelters. you keep potatoes and carrots etc down there, its dark and cool so things keep well.
    "The purpose of Life is to spread and create Happiness" :j
  • mardatha
    mardatha Posts: 15,612 Forumite
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    Or use a box filled with nice clean compost, pile all the tatties in there and store cool & dry.
    Pine cones yes at least in Scotland you can gather anything that's on the ground --but beware of THINGS WITH LOTS OF LEGS IN THEM!
  • elljay
    elljay Posts: 1,010 Forumite
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    I find carrots are fine just left in the ground. The last ones get chucked to the animals when I'm replanting in spring. Spuds are also fine left where they are - as long as you can remember where they are as the foliage will die down. I was eating both until I needed the ground again this spring, except when the ground is too frosted hard to pull them up that is. You maybe lose a few but underground is a good place to be in the winter, or even on a freezing cold day like today - brr!
    Liz
  • Frugaldom
    Frugaldom Posts: 6,944 Forumite
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    mardatha wrote: »
    Or use a box filled with nice clean compost, pile all the tatties in there and store cool & dry.
    Pine cones yes at least in Scotland you can gather anything that's on the ground --but beware of THINGS WITH LOTS OF LEGS IN THEM!

    That's great! Saving the last of the candles and rubbing the wax into the dried cones makes them excellent firelighters. I used to use a sprinkle of candle ends if the fire was slow to kindle, a sprinkle of salt to damp it down and a sprinkle of sugar to perk it up a bit if a log happened to be a little bit damp. I'm still intrigued by the potato peelings cleaning the chimney, though, as I always burned mine. I wonder if it really did help? :)

    Thanks for the potato storing tips, I'm thinking of how NOT to lose this year's garden crop in the event we need to move house.
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  • mardatha
    mardatha Posts: 15,612 Forumite
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    I burn tattie peelings , our stove is only off in the hottest spell of hot summers ( it hasnt been off since last sept ) and I get the sweep in once a year and he always its nice & clean.... but mind you, his dad used to say the same thing to everybody LOL
  • Seakay
    Seakay Posts: 4,266 Forumite
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    My sister uses fresh goat milk to make yoghurt - she uses a wide mouthed flask.
  • count_rostov
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    BMcQueen wrote: »
    Hi all, anyone know what the regulations are re. selling free range eggs ? I have often though about keeping a few hens & selling the eggs, but was told by friends that I couldn't unless I had food hygiene certificates, insurance, etc. in case someone gets salmonella, etc. ?

    Thanks

    Barry
    :confused::confused:
    You're allowed to sell eggs 'at the farm gate' without a packing facility or hygiene certificates there's info on the DEFRA website but it's very boring so I didn't post a link!
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  • poohbear59
    poohbear59 Posts: 4,866 Forumite
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    I sell free range eggs to friends, but only the ones I find in the nesting boxes. All the other eggs we find hidden away in clutches we use ourselves so we can be sure that those we sell are really fresh. Our hens are 'very' free range, can travel a long way from the house into the fields around us so tend to be rather naughty and hide their eggs at this time of year.

    I have heard that you can feed potato peelings to hens but mine won't touch them.
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  • harryhound
    harryhound Posts: 2,662 Forumite
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    I'm in the same situation and am currently investigating converting to geothermal / air heating.
    kerrie

    Me too:T; there have been a couple of moneysavers on this forum, who are well pleased with their GSHP's
    However a Ground Source Heat Pump works best in a high thermal mass very well insulated and draft proof house.
    Like most "green" technology it is a low grade "trickle" heat and you will be using the house itself as a night storage heater.
    Beware of "hype".
  • Kimitatsu
    Kimitatsu Posts: 3,894 Forumite
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    poohbear59 wrote: »
    I sell free range eggs to friends, but only the ones I find in the nesting boxes. All the other eggs we find hidden away in clutches we use ourselves so we can be sure that those we sell are really fresh. Our hens are 'very' free range, can travel a long way from the house into the fields around us so tend to be rather naughty and hide their eggs at this time of year.

    I have heard that you can feed potato peelings to hens but mine won't touch them.

    You can feed them to them but you need to cook them so that they break down a bit more - in their raw form they are too tough to be broken up by the chickens beak. My great aunt used to make up what she called chicken mash which had oats, potato peelings and veg peelings in it, smelt lovely and the chickens loved it.

    My rural money saving tips are, get chickens, there is a lot of good will bought with half a dozen fresh egss ;) , we burn all our felled trees, the prunings go into the mulcher (which the log man brings down for us when he delivers the logs (we dont have enough for the winter), whilst he puts the logs away his mate mulches the stuff which then goes onto the garden). Encourage wildlife where you can, we dont have a slug problem any more since we built some hedgehog shelters (all bits sourced from freecycle). Get to know your postie he is the chepest alarm system going, ours always knows when we should be in or not, and if the garage door should be open or not - anything out of the ordinary, or if there is something urgent he pops back when he knows we are in.

    Shop around the feed merchants, they often knock off a couple of quid for a bag of dog food if you are a regular, and many will deliver for nothing if you are on a regular route (saves your petrol!). Speak to your local butcher and/or farm shop, ours keeps a large bacg of bones for the dogs every week (when they have finished with them the foxes in the wood next door get them - keeps them fed and away from my chooks!), and they save up "pet mince" for me. Pet mince in the case of our farm shop is the bits that they cant sell because it looks unsightly - so the off cuts from 28 day hung beef, its a bit discoloured but thats about it! As has been also siad you can buy freezer packs for the duration, ours does half a lamb for between 30 and 35 pounds but in reality you can pretty much choose what you want in it, the big advantage is it comes already packed for you, and you have watched it bouncing around the fields the weeks before, saves on packaging and petrol because it hasnt been transported half way round the world.
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