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Great Rural MoneySaving Hunt

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  • harryhound
    harryhound Posts: 2,662 Forumite
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    nykmedia wrote: »
    Monkey nuts are sold in the trade as 'groundnuts' but many still just call them peanuts. The cheapest are sold as 'splits' and you don't want to eat them. In my opinion, I'd think it was far safer to stick to those products that are available for sale through normal suppliers and not pet shops. It just isn't worth the risk.

    PS: I know people who won't even feed their parrots pet shop bought peanuts/monkey nuts/groundnuts so that may say something.

    And this is why:

    http://forums.moneysavingexpert.com/showthread.html?p=6872396&highlight=Turkey#post6872396

    If they are fed to an animal that is going to be slaughtered long before it suffers liver damage, there is not much of a risk!
  • sylviahowe
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    I have tried to find out how to buy wood from the Forestry Commission - we live near Bedgebury Forest which would I should think be a rather good source of wood but I can't find out how to do it, or find out when wood is being sold.
    Don't mean to be thick but would welcome some further directions.
    Thanks
    This is a great tip. I too shop around for the best oil price but I have started to burn logs in our fireplaces and a log burner to provide background heat as an alternative to burning oil. I have worked out that burning wood is cheaper than oil - especially now that the oil price has risen so much.

    It is also greener as wood is a renewable source. I collect fallen twigs from the garden after every storm and keep all prunings as kindling. Any branches that I remove from the older trees I saw up into the right size - good exercise. For a small fee I can have a day of wood collection on the Forestry Commission land - collecting the side branches that they trim off. (Borrow a trailer and chain saw) It is also easy and comparatively cheap to have logs delivered from some of the local farmers. The wood ash can also be used as a soil improver.
  • Frugaldom
    Frugaldom Posts: 6,941 Forumite
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    I quess its all about " Can you be bothered- and more importantly do you have a chimney?" Living reasonably near a beach naturally has its advantages..firstly our children and now our grandchildren love/d to pick-up the endless free driftwood ( On a reasonable day of course!) and get the benefit of "The two warms!!!" One whilst collecting. the second whilst burning.....and on a woodburner in the middle of winter, its something else. Gives a much wider smile on current Gas prices honest!....

    I was told that, "under no circumstances" should driftwood be burnt, but cannot remember why. I'm sure it has something to do with the salt content and some sort of chemical reaction as it burns. If this is not the case then someone please let me know, as I've passed up on years of free fuel if it's safe to burn. :o
    I reserve the right not to spend.
    The less I spend, the more I can afford.


    Frugal living challenge - living on £4000 in 2024
  • MoJo
    MoJo Posts: 542 Forumite
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    sylviahowe wrote: »
    I have tried to find out how to buy wood from the Forestry Commission - we live near Bedgebury Forest which would I should think be a rather good source of wood but I can't find out how to do it, or find out when wood is being sold.
    Don't mean to be thick but would welcome some further directions.
    Thanks

    The info you're looking for is in this thread, in the early posts :)
  • Seakay
    Seakay Posts: 4,265 Forumite
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    vandanfc wrote: »
    They may well say bakery grade, but most packs I have seen also state NOT for human consumption !

    I did check the sack, and it definitely said "bakery grade" and nowhere did it say "not for human cosumption".

    I grind them and use them to make sunflowerseed biscuits, so needed half a pound at a time.
  • poohbear59
    poohbear59 Posts: 4,866 Forumite
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    nykmedia wrote: »
    Monkey nuts are sold in the trade as 'groundnuts' but many still just call them peanuts. The cheapest are sold as 'splits' and you don't want to eat them. In my opinion, I'd think it was far safer to stick to those products that are available for sale through normal suppliers and not pet shops. It just isn't worth the risk.

    PS: I know people who won't even feed their parrots pet shop bought peanuts/monkey nuts/groundnuts so that may say something.

    My local pet store owner tells me that the ground nuts for sale for birds have to be a higher grade than those sold for human consumption and often recommends that he buy them for ourselves. I haven't dared but in the past I did buy horse carrots for us as I could see no difference other that shape. I have since learnt about the pesticides used on carrots and only buy organic if I have none of my own home grown left.
    business mortgage £0))''(+ Barclay's business kitchen loan £0=Total paid off was £96105 PPI claimed and received £13527
    'I had a black dog, his name was depression".
  • Frugaldom
    Frugaldom Posts: 6,941 Forumite
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    poohbear59 wrote: »
    My local pet store owner tells me that the ground nuts for sale for birds have to be a higher grade than those sold for human consumption and often recommends that he buy them for ourselves.

    Perhaps your pet store owner just wants to make a sale. No matter how safe it may or may not be to eat pet food, NO pet shop owner should ever 'recommend' it to customers for human consumption. Sorry, Poohbear, no reflection on you, I think you maybe just made a less than wise choice of words, but the above, as a quote, could cost someone their business.

    Please, anyone reading this, there are better, safer ways of saving money and cutting costs than buying pet food for eating.
    I reserve the right not to spend.
    The less I spend, the more I can afford.


    Frugal living challenge - living on £4000 in 2024
  • harryhound
    harryhound Posts: 2,662 Forumite
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    nykmedia wrote: »
    I was told that, "under no circumstances" should driftwood be burnt, but cannot remember why. I'm sure it has something to do with the salt content and some sort of chemical reaction as it burns. If this is not the case then someone please let me know, as I've passed up on years of free fuel if it's safe to burn. :o

    I seem to remember, back in the days of coal fires (and smogs), a bit of salt was supposed to shift the soot in the chimney - probably an old wives tale?

    Sea water contains a cocktail of chemicals, the major one being sodium chloride. NaCl vaporises at about 1500 centigrade, so presumably would deposit on the inside of the chimney. Here it would collect moisture and mix with the sulphur compounds in coal smoke. Salty surphuric acid would not be good for the inside of the chimney and if you study tall chimneys on the side of houses (1920's/30's style ) you may find some curving towards the sun. The damp acidic mortar decays and swells (a bit like rust) especially on the cold North side of the chimney.
    That said, I would burn drift wood in my wood burner, as I have a small central chimney and no neighbours to suffer the smoke/pollution.
  • boyse7en
    boyse7en Posts: 883 Forumite
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    Don't know about driftwood, but I know that burning engineered woods (plywood, MDF, sterling board) is a bad idea as the glues used vaporise, then condense in the chimney leaving a nice sticky surface for the soot to stick to. Can cause a chimney fire if it gets too bad.

    One tip I have is to get a trailer, and a reputation for being 'useful'. I've been given loads of stuff by friends and friends-of-friends who no longer want it and don't want to pay for it to be removed, including an almost new shed, an oil-fired combi-boiler, several hundred paving slabs, oak offcuts (for the woodburner), pallets (can make fencing panels, and burn the rest), tonnes of topsoil, horse manure, swing hammock for the garden, railway sleepers, etc.
  • mardatha
    mardatha Posts: 15,612 Forumite
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    I always heard you should burn tattie peelings to clean the soot out of the chimney.
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