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repair double glazing

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  • The Black rubber around the inside of my double glazing has started to shrink in the cornersl, leaving gaps that let in draughts. Can I purchase this rubber to replace it. If yes where from.

    Thanks
    Stan
  • rayz_xrayz_x Forumite
    12 posts
    This website has a lot of useful advice about misted units, and other double glazing things besides - http://www.thewindowman.co.uk/repairswindows.htm
    Also downloadable stuff on fitting dg units in wood frames - the spacers mentioned in an earlier post, and the drainage in the frame seem critical to the whole 'misting' problem, and are probably very important issue when refitting.
    Ray
  • maninthestreetmaninthestreet Forumite
    16.1K posts
    Part of the Furniture
    ✭✭✭✭✭
    ccwwuk wrote: »
    It is possible to repair all failed sealed units, one company has over twenty years experience, be on your guard a lot of cowboys say they can repair the units but can not. crystal clear window works guarantee all the units for 20 years and what is more it is an insurance company backed guarantee. check out the website. crystalclearwindow.co.uk.

    S-P-A-M!!!
    "You were only supposed to blow the bl**dy doors off!!"
  • Hi , new to the site and have digested all the info on double glazing repairs. I too suffer from misting and have always replaced my units with new ones. I have wooden frames with smallish (18 x18in) units in a 4x6x4mm ratio. But now I reckon i'll try and repair the units, after all nothing's broken. I can certainly see how you disemble the units but how do you get the new desicant into the spacer bars and empty the old?. I did read that silica gel can be regenerated by heating, so driving off the moisture that it has absorbed. Anyone done it? If after one of the panes of glass is detached and all cleaned, could the other piece of glass with the spacer bars still attached be put into a warm oven to do this, and then while warm reattach to the cleaned pane of glass using silicon? Voila, a new sealed double glazed unit for free!
  • Hi Guys,

    I have read with huge interest and there seems to be some confusion with regards to the window repair system. Replacing double glazed units is now a thing of the past! How do i know?? I have been going out everyday for the last 6 years repairing failed steamed up, misty double glazed units! Ive also assisted with the training of other glaziers from all around the country and provide them with any technical assistance should they require it.

    It doesnt matter if your window frames are wooden, aliminium or upvc all the repair work is done whilst the window remains in situ. Windows can also be repaired from either the inside or the outside.

    I have now personally repaired 1000's of double glazed units in the north west area and have an advanced knowledge of how the system performs and works.

    I would be more than happy to answer any of your questions so please do feel free

    Thanks

    Craig
  • CPT wrote: »
    Hi Guys,

    I have read with huge interest and there seems to be some confusion with regards to the window repair system. Replacing double glazed units is now a thing of the past! How do i know?? I have been going out everyday for the last 6 years repairing failed steamed up, misty double glazed units! Ive also assisted with the training of other glaziers from all around the country and provide them with any technical assistance should they require it.

    It doesnt matter if your window frames are wooden, aliminium or upvc all the repair work is done whilst the window remains in situ. Windows can also be repaired from either the inside or the outside.

    I have now personally repaired 1000's of double glazed units in the north west area and have an advanced knowledge of how the system performs and works.

    I would be more than happy to answer any of your questions so please do feel free

    Thanks

    Craig

    Never read so much spam
  • garymarsdengarymarsden Forumite
    4 posts
    Part of the Furniture First Post Combo Breaker
    kiteman1 wrote: »
    SUCCESS! It is now 5 days since i resealed my sealed units with silicone sealant, slight mist that formed after completing the job has now all dried out, may be sealant sucked it all up, may be some remaining old desicant absorbed it, but for the last two days all sealed units are cristal clear. The whole project cost me £1.25 for a tube of sealant from LIDL's !!! You can clear water or scale markes from sealed units with a scraper/scourer/fairy liquid. As for drilling any holes, it can be done from one side, but not cleanly, but dont bother, its a waste of time. Just remove sealed unit, split the unity, reseal the edges, clean with window cleaner and refit asap.
    Have the resealed units survived so far? Anyone else had any success resealing? Any more tips? We have lots of misted units and I am about to try resealing some of them.
  • Followed this article with interest. I solved the misting problem by
    1. Removing the old desicant beads by drilling a hole in the edge of the cell (don't drill all the way through)
    2. Use a airbed pump to replace the air (the alloy metal edge contains small holes that allows air to pass through)
    3. Replace the desicant with silica cell (widely available from craft shops or ebay)
    5. Reseal the drilled holes
    6. Optionally paint the edges with roof sealant or similar

    Optionally I've started using Argon to replace the air in the cells (again available from Mig welding suppliers) - this is heavier than air and has low thermal conductivity.

    Result - windows have been free from mist from several years so far.

    (P.S. I've found I can clear water stains by pouring meths into the cell then drying out by pumping through air for 20 mins)

    One question I have though - is where on earth do you buy replacement glass units if needed - can't find a single supplier who will just sell the glass units!
  • david100351david100351 Forumite
    16 posts
    Part of the Furniture Combo Breaker
    harryhound wrote: »
    My local DG unit manufacturer demonstrated his machine for partially filling the edging strips with desiccant. Then to demonstrate how effective it is he poked the strip into a damp rag. It got warm suggesting some sort of chemical reaction was taking place.Any idea what he was using as desiccant?

    Changes in temperature are not a definite indicator of a chemical reaction: desiccants are just very water-friendly compounds which have been forceably dried out. When they get hold of some water again, they attach in a firm way, and its quite normal for heat to result.

    The two common desicants I've come across are Calcium Chloride and Silica Gel. Calcium Chloride absorbs so much water it becomes liquid, but it can in theory be dried out again - although its so cheap and messy it probably isn't worth doing yourself. That's the stuff in these plastic dehumidifiers you put behind wardrobes, and stuff.Silica gel is the stuff they pack in sachets with cameras, some medicines, tops of biscuit tins, and although it doesn't absorb nearly as much water, it remains dry, and can be re-dehydrated easily by putting in a oven that's hot from cooking.
  • mrcpeamrcpea Forumite
    1 posts
    What an excellent find this forum is.
    All our downstairs windows have misted up, & want to remove this.
    There looks to be some great tips on here.

    Regards

    mrcpea
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