New Post Advanced Search

repair double glazing

87 replies 440.7K views
1234579

Replies

  • :eek:I have never heard such a load of old crap, you can not fix a broken down double glazed unit for a number of reasons, first how are you expected to clean both bits of glass inside through a small hole drilled in the glass. Once a unit has gone there is a residew inside that is almlost impossible to remove even with the unit split down. second how are you expected to replace the desicant which is the little round balls that fill the spacer bar, this is what gets rid of the moisture between the glass if any but can only take so much then it becomes one of the reasons the unit mists up as the moisture it has absorbed is released back into the unit when it warms up. also if the unit has broken down then the seal around the edge has obviously gone so will need redoing, this can only be done by cutting both bits of glass off the spacer bar and replacing the spacer and hotmelt (the stuff used to stick and seal the unit together) as both will be unsuasable after. it seems to be that only people in the double glazing game are putting this new mirricle cure down and could be seen as we are trying to cover up what if it worked would be a damaging solution to misty glass. The truth is that we actually know what we are talking about and know the only way to fix the problem is to replace the unit(not the hole window) as we know how a unit is made and works in the first place so know that there is know way this method could or would work or last very long.
  • I have been replacing broken down double glazed units for about 7 years now I also manufacture the glass and in my expert oponion the only way is to replace the complete double glazed unit. Who would want holes drilled into there glass anyway and the cost is probably more expensive as I would supply and fit a double glazed unit 750mm wide by 250mm high for about £45 with a 5 year guarantee
  • willhay99 wrote: »
    Followed this article with interest. I solved the misting problem by
    1. Removing the old desicant beads by drilling a hole in the edge of the cell (don't drill all the way through)
    2. Use a airbed pump to replace the air (the alloy metal edge contains small holes that allows air to pass through)
    3. Replace the desicant with silica cell (widely available from craft shops or ebay)
    5. Reseal the drilled holes
    6. Optionally paint the edges with roof sealant or similar

    Optionally I've started using Argon to replace the air in the cells (again available from Mig welding suppliers) - this is heavier than air and has low thermal conductivity.

    Result - windows have been free from mist from several years so far.

    (P.S. I've found I can clear water stains by pouring meths into the cell then drying out by pumping through air for 20 mins)

    One question I have though - is where on earth do you buy replacement glass units if needed - can't find a single supplier who will just sell the glass units!

    Good one, I was thinking along the same lines. I just discovered one of my windows in state (not only misted but also having an inch of water at the bottom) and want to try to repair it.

    Seals are likely to be severely damaged, i did not remove the unit yet but I think I can simply melt the mastic with a little pocket soldering torch to reseal it, right? It surely melts the mastic, I tried on an old window I have laying around. Then paint on the top with roof sealant

    Rest I want to do the same way- drill the hole, wash with alcohol, replace the desicant, pump air out and fill with Argon. For that i would need to put together a device with a pipe and a tap through which I can suck the air out with hoover/bed pump, close the tap, connect the Argon tube and fill with Argon. I can get Argon from Toolstation, where can I get the connector to it so I can link it with my "filling" device? I don't have a welding machine here.

    No matter what the experienced glazers say, this is as cheap as it can get, and fun. And if it doesn't work, I can still call them to replace the glass :p
  • i'VE just watched a video from crystal clear about this. The fitter drilled a couple of holes in the glass and ran a ballbearing inside the glass gap with a magnet. He squirted water inside the gap to clean them and then put valves into the holes. Can't see though why it will not mist up again as the original problem is not fixed. Will these valves create some sort of equilibrium which will stop the condensation. I'd have to see one 9 months later.
  • dickturpin wrote: »
    i'VE just watched a video from crystal clear about this. The fitter drilled a couple of holes in the glass and ran a ballbearing inside the glass gap with a magnet. He squirted water inside the gap to clean them and then put valves into the holes. Can't see though why it will not mist up again as the original problem is not fixed. Will these valves create some sort of equilibrium which will stop the condensation. I'd have to see one 9 months later.

    All these guys claim to be able to "fix"them, got to ask yourself if this was all it takes then why don't double glazing companies do this at the point of manufacture and offer a lifetime guarantee. Answer is simple, it's snake oil, buyer beware.
  • SharonXXXSharonXXX Forumite
    1 posts
    I was told by my local double glazing company that this doe not really work, they said that you have to drill a hole in the glass and then they spray a liquid in and just cover the holes up which will bug me. So i opted for 0121 repairs to change them.
    Great job actually cheaper than having them sprayed.
    So i said i would leave a review for the company 0121 Repairs
  • sashmansashman Forumite
    321 posts
    Seems to work. I am very sceptical but just seen it done. Old misted units get washed through and coated with clearShield a tried and tested surface treatment that keeps glass clean. I know the inside should mist up again but seems the coating is sufficient to prevent this.

    As to Why all glass isn't coated, most sealed units last a Long time, most won't fail, but this is an environmentally friendly repair, no new units to make.

    Sashman
    Buying quality goods which last, should be an investment that saves money. :T
    Buying cheap products which fail, wastes money and costs twice as much in the long run. :mad:



  • petkowipetkowi Forumite
    2 posts
    Hi everybody,
    I am able to make a hole in my IGU and leave it for a certain period of time until the moisture get out. My question is where I can get this ventils to install onto drilled glass. And if that helps it is very strange why that technology is not adopt from big IGU producers. Why it is necessary to have hermetical unit instead of ventilated one. In reference with this new IGU technologies I have met interesting company web page. They offer very innovative IG units consisting of plastic frame and glass plates without any metal spacer. Looking at their system I think it is much easier to fix after exploitation period (10 years) that kind of window with making drills into plastic frame instead of glass. Their system is called energy-profiles and they produce it in Bulgaria.

    Thank you in advance
    for your response
  • glazierglazier Forumite
    3 posts
    external georgian bars were never a good idea. There are some seriously strong glues on the market now . I think I would try this route .Do a sample experiment first with a plastic strip on some old glass.
  • glazierglazier Forumite
    3 posts
    I have replaced quite a few of these so called magic hole drill cures. one thing I dont understand is why these so called repair people have not been pursued to honour there guarantees by the people that have been ripped off by them.
Sign In or Register to comment.

Quick links

Essential Money | Who & Where are you? | Work & Benefits | Household and travel | Shopping & Freebies | About MSE | The MoneySavers Arms | Covid-19 & Coronavirus Support