Woodburner installed - thanks everyone for advice

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  • The installer says he has special rods for doing it, so I'll have to take him on his word, but he did a good job from appearances, although won't know till I light it. Thanks for the tip on creepy crawlines - am getting that wood out tomorrow pronto.

    So all I do with the grate is occasionally give it push/pull to kick the ashes into the pan? And with the air control thing at the front keep that opened, initially when burning wood, then closed to slow the burn, and keep it open when burning coal to let the bottom air through?
  • suki1964suki1964 Forumite
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    That knob on the side there will riddle the ashes, let them drop in the pan but they should do that themselves.

    That stove looks like the same set up as the one I have downstairs and I rarely riddle is as I let it burn out every night and clean it before I light it again

    To get a good fire going you need a lot of air - I sometimes have to keep the door open a touch as well as have the wheel open fully. When Im getting a good burn I close the wheel - adjusting as needed
  • MojisolaMojisola Forumite
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    Won't the heat from the stove affect the TV?
  • A._BadgerA._Badger Forumite
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    So all I do with the grate is occasionally give it push/pull to kick the ashes into the pan? And with the air control thing at the front keep that opened, initially when burning wood, then closed to slow the burn, and keep it open when burning coal to let the bottom air through?

    The idea of a moving grate is to enable you to deposit ash into the ashpan beneath. This is very important to do on a regular basis when using coal or smokeless fuel as if you block the flow of air, you will burn through your firebars. The people who sold me my current house did just that - one ruined 12kw stove, which I had to replace.

    When burning coal, you riddle the fire just before you add fuel to keep the firebars open and a good flow of air coming from below. For the same reason, you need to keep that ashpan empty. Your handbook should have warned you about this as it's really important.

    If you are burning wood, on the other hand, you let the level of ash build up in the ashpan, right up over the firebars until the burning wood is sitting on a layer of ash.

    With some stoves, you can completely remove the rotating/rocking grate mechanism for when you are burning wood.

    The reason for this arrangement is that the firebars get so hot when you are burning coal or smokeless, they need a flow of air to stop them melting and because coal needs air from beneath to burn. Wood, which burns cooler than coal and won't melt your firebars, burns best with the lower air supply cut off and air directed down from the top - though this varies to some degree from stove to stove.

    You may need to experiment to get the best vent settings for your application but these are the general principles.
  • Are the firebars then the bars across the grate? What if when I'm burning any type of fuel it drops though into the ashpan? Like a bit of coal or burning splinters of wood? Is this something to be concerned with?

    My installer said give it 48 hours but do I actually need to wait this long for the fire cement to dry or could I crack it up tomorrow?
  • A._BadgerA._Badger Forumite
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    Are the firebars then the bars across the grate? What if when I'm burning any type of fuel it drops though into the ashpan? Like a bit of coal or burning splinters of wood? Is this something to be concerned with?

    My installer said give it 48 hours but do I actually need to wait this long for the fire cement to dry or could I crack it up tomorrow?

    I'm not being rude but, really, did this stove come without a handbook? If so that's really seriously wrong and you'd be well advised to get one from the manufacturer.

    The firebars are the metal bars on which the fire sits as it burns. There are gaps between them to let ash fall trough into the ash pan. When burning coal, the bars should be kept clear of ash and the ash should be emptied regularly from the ashpan.

    This is not the case when burning wood.
  • suki1964suki1964 Forumite
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    A._Badger wrote: »
    I'm not being rude but, really, did this stove come without a handbook? If so that's really seriously wrong and you'd be well advised to get one from the manufacturer.

    The firebars are the metal bars on which the fire sits as it burns. There are gaps between them to let ash fall trough into the ash pan. When burning coal, the bars should be kept clear of ash and the ash should be emptied regularly from the ashpan.

    This is not the case when burning wood.

    Im beginning to think chains are being well yanked here
  • GloomendoomGloomendoom Forumite
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    There is Ulster there are no socialist tax-increasing regulations.........

    In your dreams! :D

    Maybe you should show your installer this...

    DFP Technical Booklet L: 2006 - Combustion appliances and fuel storage systems
  • savemoneysavemoney Forumite
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    I have a multi stove and no one has said to me I need to remove the grill to burn wood, we let ash go into ash tray and empty it daily, its not a huge ash tray and can be full after a good nights burning 8+ hours
  • savemoneysavemoney Forumite
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    Seems cheap stove. I paid over £700 for Franco Belge savoy mind you looks bigger than what Ops got. We spent well over 2k with installation including liner and that was 4 years ago
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