Woodburner installed - thanks everyone for advice

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  • LOL.............


    Burnt around 6 recently felled logs, which register at circa 20% wet in the wood, but still v wet in the bark. In the end mixed this with two large homefire logs from b/q, some homefire heat logs and 4 ovals of homefire coal. The window is completely, I mean completely black, although heat output did rise noticeably once the wet wood was burnt out. I know my stove doesn't have an airwash as far as I know. I can't see how it could get so dirty as I burnt the wet logs earlier and the heat from the coal should have been sufficient, according to the manual, to keep the window clean.

    Should I be emptying the pan when there are still hot ashes in it, or should I always wait till these cool? Where is good to put hot ashes, the neighbours wheelybin?
  • weldawelda Forumite
    600 Posts
    Your stoves gonna go the Michael Jackson way if you keep feeding it those concoctions :rotfl:
  • grahamc2003grahamc2003 Forumite
    1.8K Posts
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    LOL.............


    Burnt around 6 recently felled logs, which register at circa 20% wet in the wood, but still v wet in the bark. In the end mixed this with two large homefire logs from b/q, some homefire heat logs and 4 ovals of homefire coal. The window is completely, I mean completely black, although heat output did rise noticeably once the wet wood was burnt out. I know my stove doesn't have an airwash as far as I know. I can't see how it could get so dirty as I burnt the wet logs earlier and the heat from the coal should have been sufficient, according to the manual, to keep the window clean.

    Should I be emptying the pan when there are still hot ashes in it, or should I always wait till these cool? Where is good to put hot ashes, the neighbours wheelybin?

    Strange about the soot on the glass. A real mystery. Perhaps you could try freezing the wood again after drying it in the oven for 10 minutes after its initial freezing. Should drive the soot out, by some unknown physical process.

    If it still soots up after that, I'd suggest you pinch the neighbour's window wiper off his car and rig that up to wipe the inside of the glass. Patent that and you'll soon be a millionaire. Somehow I doubt you'll have to worry about the wiper blade melting.
  • weldawelda Forumite
    600 Posts
    What do you mean?

    Ask his doctor, he's on trial in LA.

    :beer:
  • GreenfiresGreenfires Forumite
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    This stove is going to be an expensive lodger if you keep buying fuel from B&Q mate! Their stuff is usually bad and usually wet through - due to them only wanting to pay about a quid a net for it. Reading a post by a firewood guy who was looking to sell a load of poplar (pretty poor stuff in the firewood league) A major outfit who supplied the likes of B&Q were looking at taking it and packaging it up as hardwood logs - and technically it is a hardwood though many softwoods will outperform it. They said the moisture level (very high in poplar) didn't matter to them, as the market was bigger than the complaints!

    I'm not familiar with the stuff you mentioned - are the homefire logs the artificial ones full of wax and stuff? Or the generally wet wood mentioned above? Best to burn either wood or smokeless - and you'd probably be needing a fair few more than four ovals at a time to get a decent firebed established.

    If you're going to stick with wood then let the ash pan fill up. If going with smokeless then let it cool before emtying, or tip outside where it's not going to set anything alight. Be aware that carrying a pan of hot ashes through the house is likely to leave a coating of dust over most of it though!

    Where did you stick the moisture meter to test the logs by the way? In the end of the log?

    Andy
  • Thanks for advice Andy, believe it or not graham above was advocating freezing then oven drying the logs mad c***.

    I burnt this http://www.homefire-fuels.co.uk/products/homefire-premium-kiln-dried-logs
    and http://www.homefire-fuels.co.uk/products/homefire-smokeless-fuel
    and http://www.homefire-fuels.co.uk/products/instant-light-firelog
    and http://www.homefire-fuels.co.uk/products/homefire-heat-logs

    and used homefire kindling. I know it's very expensive but thought it was the best on the market judging by some comments on here, so wanted to see what the supposed best burnt like before judging it against other coal types from the local merchants.

    I wouldn't mind burning just wood - and will eventually end up doing this I think - but would be happy, for this winter, to burn only smokeless but am clueless as to what I should be getting - which might be more difficult as local merchants may not do the exact types others recommend I need. Also my stove specifically excludes something called calco which, is listed as smokeless, in the manual.

    The moisture metre I'm putting in any end of it, or along the middle. For all the wood I've ovened I can get maybe less than 10% along the sides and 10-20% along the middle. I expect however that a lot of water is being trapped in the bark, as this is still reading 37%, the top end of what my moisture metre can read. I thought the level of moisture would average out in the log? The b/q homefire logs were registering maybe 18-24%, but crucially this was found in both the exposed wood and also the bark. They burnt much better, but I started to notice real heat when firing the ovals and quick light logs in, which burnt beautifully and enthusiastically.
  • Also I did want to burn a lot of stuff - perhaps shouldn't have done so at once - to give me a brief feel for what does what. I expect if I'm going to get the heat levels from a 5-6.4kw Stanley Oisin others have described I would need to bung in a large amount of coal. I put the coal in circa half 5 or 6 and it is still ovoid and undecomposed now, but has been lit and glowing for 3 hours.
  • GreenfiresGreenfires Forumite
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    Right - I'll have a look at those links tomorrow as I'm off to bed in a tick - another 3.30 am start tomorrow!

    To test the wood though - you need to be splitting a piece and then sticking the probe into the freshly exposed surface - not into an outside face - which will always give a much lower reading.

    Kiln dried wood is generally a fairly good bet - but it needs to be kept sealed or it just reabsorbs moisture from the air until it's at the same level as you'll get with naturally seasoned stuff. Incidentally - "ultra dry" and "average of less than 20% moisture" are two phrases that don't sit together for me. Decent naturally seasoned logs can be 20% or under and there's not a whopping premium on them! Briquettes are less than half that level!

    The "logs in a bag" are full of all sorts of mucjk to make them burn so i wouldn't use them on that basis - I'm guessing they'd be pretty sooty too.

    Anyway - more tomorrow no doubt!

    Andy
  • SwipeSwipe Forumite
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    Part of the Furniture 1,000 Posts Name Dropper
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    You'd be better off testing the stove on a cold day (mid next week). Lighting it on one of the hottest days of the year is not going to give your chimney much draw, hence the blackened glass
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