Woodburner installed - thanks everyone for advice

In today - but can't use it for 48 hours to let fire cement dry out. It cost £370 for stove, £230 for installation and £20 for CO1 detector. So glad after weeks, months of confusion. Wish I'd got this in last year but couldn't as was put off by sales crap about 2K flue liners....




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  • Only question is what way do I set the grate? There doesn't seem to be a closed position - it turns with the knob, but is it not supposed to close to stop the ash always falling through?
  • suki1964suki1964 Forumite
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    not sure I Understand the question

    if you have a grate then its a multi fuel and is for burning coal and therefore you need the ash to drop through to the ash can else you would burn through your grate,

    If you are burning wood then shut the air flow from the bottom and just allow the air from the top - should slow the burn down enough for wood
  • edited 27 September 2011 at 8:48PM
    muckybuttmuckybutt Forumite
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    edited 27 September 2011 at 8:48PM
    Well it wouldnt pass building regs approval ! wheres the hearth ? :eek:

    A fire waiting to happen... nice hot coal and or ash landing on your carpet !!!

    And its a CO detector just to clarify CO is carbon monoxide and is a by product of burning fossil fuels - deadly .... CO2 is carbon dioxide found in fizzy drinks.

    Something else... how do you plan on sweeping the chimney if you dont have a liner installed ? if you do have a liner have you made sure that the internal throat plate is removeable so that it can be swept from the inside ? many inferior quality cheap stoves the throat plate cant be moved as they are either welded in or bolted in place....in which case if it were me coming to sweep it I'd condemn it !
    You may click thanks if you found my advice useful
  • kar999kar999 Forumite
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    Hard to tell from the photo, but if the stove body is 12 inches back from edge that should be complaint with building regs?

    We have a multi fuel burner but only burn wood so took the metal grate out completly as I understand wood burns best on a bed of ash.
    If the ball had gone in the net it would have been a goal.
    If my Auntie had been a man she'd have been my Uncle.
  • There is Ulster there are no socialist tax-increasing regulations.........
  • So do you think I should leave the ash in the pan? Not sure what you mean by bed of ashes as the ashes will all fall through the grate. The knob to turn the grate just moves it around 90% not sure why this this although I take on board if not understand what you're saying about solid fuel and wood.
  • edited 27 September 2011 at 9:18PM
    greatgimpogreatgimpo Forumite
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    edited 27 September 2011 at 9:18PM
    Just a small point, your image no. 4 shows logs stacked against the side of the burner - when it's lit, this will probably stink the room out (and bring out the creepy crawlies!) as it will be drying the logs out, even if they're already seasoned.
  • suki1964suki1964 Forumite
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    So do you think I should leave the ash in the pan? Not sure what you mean by bed of ashes as the ashes will all fall through the grate. The knob to turn the grate just moves it around 90% not sure why this this although I take on board if not understand what you're saying about solid fuel and wood.


    Wood burn best if left on a bad of ashes and air coming from the top - which is why wood fires stoves dont have a grate

    Coal/smokeless etc needs air to come in from underneath - hence the grate that moves - you can rock it to shake excess ash down into the pan. When burning coal you need to keep the grate and pan as clean as possible - empty at least daily, where as wood burning does work better if a good bed of ashes is left
  • suki1964suki1964 Forumite
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    As greatgimpo has said - your wood stacked to the side looks ok for picture taking but you need to move it when you light the stove.

    The heat generated by the stove will cause them to smoulder - keeping your fire alarm busy at the best - and they can ignite.


    Oh Im not a jobs worth - just speaking from experience. I now have a big hearth and I dont store any wood, matches or anything that may ignite on it. My wood supply and scuttle are kept to the side. My floor is concrete and the heat that you can feel on it when the stove is on a 5 inch deep hearth is still pretty impressive
  • A._BadgerA._Badger Forumite
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    As kar999 says, wood burns best on a bed of its own ashes, so you can leave the pan to fill up, if the grate mechanism doesn't completely close at one point of its travel. Never try that with coal or smokeless fuel, though, as that needs air coming from beneath to burn properly and if you block the flow of air the heat will melt the firebars! ideally, you need a bed of ashes a few inches thick so once you have that, you can just scoop some off from the top, in between firings, to keep the level right.

    Muckybutt raised an important point about sweeping. If your installer didn't provide an access point it could be a problem.
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