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Charging rent for 21 year old

234 replies 124.5K views
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Replies

  • ali82ali82 Forumite
    171 posts
    What are you cahrging him, rent or housekeeping? What does this include?
  • janb5janb5 Forumite
    2.2K posts
    Part of the Furniture 1,000 Posts Name Dropper I've been Money Tipped!
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    He has his own room with double bed, doesnt use broadband himself although we have it, all food, CT Sky etc. He is a qualified chef but the pay scales are very poor.
  • A good starting point is to total up all the household expenses, food, heating, phone, insurance etc then divide by the number of occupants. This will give you a basis to work on. You don't want to be making a profit out of him but he should be paying his way. So if there's three of you he would pay one third and you two thirds for yourself and your other son.
  • when I lived at home with my mum 2 years ago (im 25), I was earning roughly the same as your son. I paid half the rent, the council tax as my mum didnt work as it was coz of me she had to pay it, I paid for my own internet access and contributed to the phone line, I was also paying off my car loan aswell. I also bought all my own food shopping as I ate different stuff to her.
    If your sons gf is always staying over then surely it should be up to the 2 of them to ensure that there is enough suitable food in the house?
    Total Debt
    Was £4145.81now £0.00
  • I think the amount you should ask for depends on your son.
    When I was 21, just after finishing uni, me and my fiance/hubby lived with my parents for 18 months. We paid £25 a week between us because we were saving like mad for a deposit on our first house and my parents knew we were sensbile and would save almost everything we didn't give to them.

    If I'd been rubbish with money and wasteful, then they'd have asked us for about £150 and saved most of that for us. I think that's a great idea, and maybe if you asked for more than you really want from your son and then save some and give it him towards a car/deposit for house etc he'd really appreciate it.
  • didnt pay my parents a single bean! But I did look after myself and buy my own food for example. Anyways - thanks ma and pa, very much appreciated :D
    Debt: a bloomin big mortgage

    all posts are made for entertainment value only, nothing I say should be taken as making any sense and should really be ignored
  • Your son is getting away with blue murder and needs bringing into the real world with a mighty big Jolt. Maybe a copy of this thread would do him good.

    Just by being at home he costs you 25% on your council tax, but if he moved out on his own he would have to pay 75% of valuation.

    Take him shopping with you sometime to do the "weekly" shop, let him see just what the costs are.

    To be in debt, on his earnings, shows a total lack of respect for money and he is likely to be a millstone round your neck for a long time to come... don't we love our kids.

    I admit is is very hard for the current age groups to save/spend and be able to afford property, but being an easy touch does them no good.

    Do your own sums, it may well be that you would be better off without him or his money, then you have a hard decision to make.
  • JennyBJennyB Forumite
    224 posts
    Just to be totally controversial...!! I think it's a bit mean of parents to charge their children a lot of money for living at home. Quite often the children are on rubbish wages and could barely afford to move out because of the cost of renting/buying a home. And to say that "they have to learn how much it costs to live" or something along those lines isn't really giving the youngsters enough credit - I think most know this already. When I moved out I was more shocked about the amount of effort it took to keep a house clean!

    I'm all for giving the kids a good start in life - let them save up their money a bit and enjoy it a bit before they end up with massive mortgages that they will struggle to pay for the next 10 years!
  • JennyB wrote:
    Just to be totally controversial...!! I think it's a bit mean of parents to charge their children a lot of money for living at home. Quite often the children are on rubbish wages and could barely afford to move out because of the cost of renting/buying a home. And to say that "they have to learn how much it costs to live" or something along those lines isn't really giving the youngsters enough credit - I think most know this already. When I moved out I was more shocked about the amount of effort it took to keep a house clean!

    I'm all for giving the kids a good start in life - let them save up their money a bit and enjoy it a bit before they end up with massive mortgages that they will struggle to pay for the next 10 years!

    JennyB I understand what you are saying but this chap is not a child - he is 21 and I am sure demands all the rights that go along with this adulthood bit. He is not on rubbish wages for a 21 year old. I don't take home much more than that now and I am in my early 30's!!!:eek: Plus I run a house with my partner which is a hellavu lot more than £130 a month!!:eek:

    I think the OP should charge about £250 (then put £100 away for him for the future), it really isn't that much out of his wages when he gets into the real world or tell him you will charge him £150 for his rent but his must save at least £100 a month in a saving account he cannot touch for five years or whatever. He is only 21 and if he cannot cope on £900 a month whilst only paying you £130 I think he could well be living at home for a very very long time especially with the houseprices today, I doubt he will be getting a mortgage quickly or renting privately either. Round here to rent a one bedroom flat you are looking at at least £400 plus bills - give your son some reality.
  • robnyerobnye Forumite
    5.4K posts
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    on a slightly different tack....... when do you think is the right time to charge your children housekeeping....... 16/17, my eldest daughter is 16 1/2, she shares 2 paper rounds with her yougner sister, but is intending to get a parttime job (she is at 6 form college), meaning her income should go from £20 a week to £100 a week.
    would we (my wife an I) be fair in starting to charge her housekeeping, baring in mind we currently give her a small monthly allowance, which we have decided she will get until she finishes college (unless her wages are more)
    smile --- it makes people wonder what you are up to.... ;) :cool:
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