'The bank ID farce: online accounts don't accept online statements' blog discussion

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  • drymartini64
    drymartini64 Posts: 25 Forumite
    edited 20 October 2010 at 6:26PM
    It is interesting regarding the banks since they want us online. I had wondered about that and not cancelled my paper billing on my bank account. I have on my utilities. This of course may be a problem as when I have gone to the local council offices or the Tax office, the other day, I needed two forms of ID. SO DO NOT get rid of all your paper bills as you may need a couple for mortgages, banks, Tax etc. Some card companies insist on a Landline phone number even though a lot of people no longer bother as they have two mobiles in the family at least. The big companies want you to go online and save them money but do not accept the system in reverse when you need to call them. I used my passport and a utility bill in the tax office but not every one may have a passport
  • grumbler
    grumbler Posts: 58,629 Forumite
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    edited 20 October 2010 at 7:52PM
    Martin wrote:
    I’ve never studied in detail whether this is all due to banks’ bureaucracy or, as I suspect, ever more strict money laundering regulations.
    Obviously, it's due to to protection against fraud. A screenshot or a printed online statement are far to easy to forge. A photocopy of the license is just a little more difficult.

    The only real alternative to certified copies I see is visiting some branch personally with your IDs and some originals proving your address.

    And even 'original' bills and statements are very easy objects for forging nowadays. Proving your address either has to be abandoned or needs some radically new ways of doing this instead of providing ridiculous utility bills or statements.
  • Old_Git
    Old_Git Posts: 4,744 Forumite
    First Post First Anniversary Mortgage-free Glee! Cashback Cashier
    I asked Abbey (now santander ) for online billing only,they refused because it was a joint account and we used two different addresses .
    "Do not regret growing older, it's a privilege denied to many"
  • peter999
    peter999 Posts: 7,097 Forumite
    First Post First Anniversary Combo Breaker
    They're just covering their backs, it doesn't matter that you have to run round the block.

    The banks & people checking probably don't know what it's about anymore, they just follow any rules blindly.

    Bureaucracy gone mad.

    And the most annoying thing is reading banks requests for you to go paperless paying lip service to green issues, as if they really care.
  • Working in the Fraud side of the banking industry I see both sides of this coin. You would be surprised at how easy it is to obtain small details about you, which can build up to quite significant personal information which can then be used to open new facilities, or takeover current facilities you have. Those committing these acts are getting ever more professional in the way they approach their fraudulent activity.

    One of the most difficult balancing acts banks today have to complete is ease of doing business with customers versus minimising the fraud risk. How individual banks go about this is their decision, but I'm pretty certain most of us would rather a little inconvenience to try and protect our identity and hard earned cash.
    If your identity is used for fraululent activity, there will be many weeks, possibly months of hard work to follow to right all the wrongs which may occur particulary if the fraud occurs across several institutions.
    Banks are not all out to 'rip off' UK consumers as appears to be the concensus on here, and deliberately make things difficult. However, the environment today makes the fine line between customer security and making it easy to do business is becoming increasingly finer and some genuine customers will be negatively impacted by the security required by organisations.
  • peter999 wrote: »
    They're just covering their backs, it doesn't matter that you have to run round the block.

    The banks & people checking probably don't know what it's about anymore, they just follow any rules blindly.

    Bureaucracy gone mad.

    And the most annoying thing is reading banks requests for you to go paperless paying lip service to green issues, as if they really care.

    Agree with the above.
    I once took my documents into a bank for be verified there and then on the spot and from my position I could view the data being entered up on the computer by the staff member.
    It was clear to me that they did not give a hoot about whether my ID was mine or not....all they wanted was to fill in on a table of permissible ID's, which one it was and the ID serial number as appropiate to the type of ID. Boxes all ticked as required, signed off my the staff member and hey presto I was "approved"......

    Nuts....
  • I now live in New Zealand and wanted to open ex-pat accounts in the IOM - they needed proof of id and residence as everything is done by post for obvious reasons. They also needed proof of the money I would be investing but wouldn't accept a home printed statement. The money was in a online only account, and the website info for that account stated that no statements were produced. So I printed the statement and the page from the website saying that no statements were produced and took them with everything else to my migrant banker here in Christchurch. She signed everything, I sent it all off and both banks in the IOM opened the accounts no problem.
  • billers wrote: »
    Working in the Fraud side of the banking industry I see both sides of this coin. You would be surprised at how easy it is to obtain small details about you, which can build up to quite significant personal information which can then be used to open new facilities, or takeover current facilities you have. Those committing these acts are getting ever more professional in the way they approach their fraudulent activity.

    One of the most difficult balancing acts banks today have to complete is ease of doing business with customers versus minimising the fraud risk. How individual banks go about this is their decision, but I'm pretty certain most of us would rather a little inconvenience to try and protect our identity and hard earned cash.
    If your identity is used for fraululent activity, there will be many weeks, possibly months of hard work to follow to right all the wrongs which may occur particulary if the fraud occurs across several institutions.
    Banks are not all out to 'rip off' UK consumers as appears to be the concensus on here, and deliberately make things difficult. However, the environment today makes the fine line between customer security and making it easy to do business is becoming increasingly finer and some genuine customers will be negatively impacted by the security required by organisations.

    I don't have any problem with your comments....the problem is consistency between banks which is lacking.

    Take just a passport copy.....some will accept a mere photocopy, others a certified photocopy authorised by a wide range of persons, others it has to be a FSA regulated person doing the certifying.

    Then there are the other ID's which are acceptable to some but not others. For example an I.Revenue letter requiring a tax return to be submitted sent to you at your address is acceptable to one organisation I know, but for another this is not acceptable and it has to be a I.Revenue PAYE notification letter (helpful if your self employed...err not)

    I'm sorry to say these sort of inconsistent requirements are indeed coming over to the customer as trying to make life difficult for them.
  • :(Once again it's the fraudsters who spoil everything & make life more complicated for everyone else, hence all the extra red tape & time we waste trying to comply. I agree that it is all very frustrating for the honest citizen & these complications seem to appear every day. Nothing is simple or straightforward anymore!
  • HairY
    HairY Posts: 5,008 Forumite
    edited 21 October 2010 at 3:27AM
    I recently dealt with a company that wanted me to e-mail them a scan of a utility bill or bank statement to prove my residential address.

    Being paper-free myself, and only having on-line "e-statements", I sent one in jpeg format and it was refused because they wanted a scan of a paper statement.

    In the end I printed the e-statement, re-scanned it so the edges of the paper were visible, and it was then accepted within minutes.

    :doh:
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