Great UK's Top Designer Charity Shops Hunt

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  • For anyone living close to Alderley Edge in South Manchester, I can recommend the three charity shops on the high street. This is THE place for designer rejects from (a sweeping generalisation coming...but its probably true) cheshire ladies who lunch and only ever wear an outfit or pair of shoes once!

    I've spotted DKNY, Jimmy Choos, Armani and Prada.

    The shops are sometimes even open in Sundays, and they are very popular.....full of people like me, hoping to get some designer swag for much cheaper. However, they have cottoned onto their popularity, and I've noticed they're putting up the prices - so be quick!
  • alliboy03
    alliboy03 Posts: 186 Forumite
    First Post Photogenic First Anniversary Combo Breaker
    DrFluffy wrote:
    Get a grip! It was someones opinion, like it or not... They commented on the smell (and it IS gross - from a charity shop volunteer!), not on the people who staff it or the cause...

    If people didn't shop at them because of the smell, then the charities would suffer...

    GET a life:A

    DFWNERD no.1168Rules of Happiness 1)Free your heart of hatred 2) Live Simply 3):jEvery penny's a prisoner
  • Sophy
    Sophy Posts: 486 Forumite
    alliboy03 wrote:
    MOSt charity shop workers are volunteers and work very hard just to help out. Steaming the clothes is just to get the creases out so it looks better on the hanger, NOT for any washing purposes! The "sickly smell" is the previous persons fabric conditioner (if they've washed it at all!) any smell on the clothes is made stronger by the steamer, so that's were the smell is from! I resent your comments and feel you should be grateful that the charity shops are there in the first place, if it wasn't for hard working volunteer's THEY WOULD ALL BE CLOSED!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!Incidentely if it's not good enough for you don't shop in them! :D

    Do charity shops not wash the clothes then? Genuinely curious here, when a friend worked in a charity shop, she complained about all the tumble drying she had to do! I use a fabric conditioner, and iron my clothes, and have never come up with a putrid, almost permananent aroma like the steam cleaner afterwards!

    Resent away all you like, at my comments, that's your choice after all. Think you're making an absolute SHOUTY TEXT mountain out of a molehill, however!
  • fsdss
    fsdss Posts: 1,429 Forumite
    First Anniversary Combo Breaker
    i no longer visit charity shops .. i begrudge paying over the odds for a similar item which has been DONATED to its store. for example i went into one about 12 months (british heart foundation), my son had his pocket money and saw a toy (disney)grubby in the window. wanting it we went in and the price was £14. ok so if it was worth £20+ he would have got a bargain, however it was priced £14.99 new and boxed at many nearby toy stores. (this is not my only experience of charity shops overpricing - its just an example)

    many may not share my thoughts but however i believe that charity shops are there to help the needy also.

    charity shops may be a business but have reduced business rates, very little staff overheads etc.

    i no longer donate either, i begrudge going in with bin bags full of childrens clothes without even a thankyou (i'm not expecting a royal welcome but a basic thankyou would suffice). i would rather donate childrens clothes to homestart where they can be shared with needy families.
    Give blood - its free
  • Sophy wrote:
    Incidentally, I do wish charity shops would find a method of cleaning clothes other than steam cleaning!! Yes, it's thorough, but that sickly sweet, slightly stale aroma is repellent! Takes about three spins in the machine and an overnight airing (preferably on a rainy, windy night) to get rid of the eau de charity shop smell.

    I work in a charity shop and we don't have the facilities or budget to start cleaning the clothes we receive. We rely on them being freshly laundered when brought to us. If they are not, then they go to the ragman, designer label or not!!! We have a steamer but only for taking creases out of things. These days we find people are dumping all sorts of rubbish on us just to avoid taking it to the tip. It's disgusting really what we have to sort through all in the name of charity. We are all volunteers in my local hospice shop. If you do kindly donate to charity shops PLEASE make sure they are clean, freshly laundered and of decent quality. Anything with holes or threadbare gets sent to the rags. Thankyou kindly for any donations you do make.
  • If charity shops don't wash donated clothes - and I can understand why they may not be able to - and throw out those that haven't been laundered before donation, then where does that trademark 'scent' come from?
  • I volunteer in a local charity shop in Gloucester & we can have some great bargains but I agree with posters here that they can be too expensive. A lot of the big chain stores can sell on item so cheaply we cannot compete with them.

    Where washing or cleaning the clothes is concerned, the expense would be too great. In saying that, we do take clothes home ourselves if they are good items that just need a wash. Steaming just takes the creases out & prepares the clothes for sale.

    Where pricing is concerned, all pricing is set by the charity & it is then the same across the country but I think it should be set by the manager in the shops because they know what sells & what doesn't.

    One more thing..........if you are going to donate to a charity shop please stop & think.
    Would you buy these clothes yourself?
    Are they in good condition? no bobbling, stains, or colour runs
    No chipped glasses or china please
    Would you buy just one glass? Sets only please
    Books-up-to-date, no old books unless 1st editions(lol)
    No magazines
    A lot of shops will not take electrical items either

    All items that are not suitable for the shop floor have to be binned & bins emptied are expensive.

    We have noticed that since the closed bin rule has been enforced we are getting more rubbish because people can not throw it in their bin.

    Please recycle at the recycling centre all items not 'good enough' to be sold on.

    I hope this does not make us sound ungrateful but people only will buy good condition items. The rule of thumb is 'Would you buy this in a charity shop?'

    Enjoy getting your bargains

    Thanks Christine
  • cmhbyandco wrote: »
    I volunteer in a local charity shop in Gloucester & we can have some great bargains but I agree with posters here that they can be too expensive. A lot of the big chain stores can sell on item so cheaply we cannot compete with them.

    I've been going to charity shops for years. Think its a throwback to my student days lol. But recently I just having been bothering as much, because I feel that the clothes are getting too expensive :think: You say that charity shops can't compete, but I would have thought that their running costs were minimal, so why can't they compete? The stock is free, the shops are mainly staffed by volunteers for free, they get reduced council rates etc

    I'm not having a pop at you btw Christine. I'm just curious and not had the opportunity to ask someone who works in a charity shop this question before :rotfl:
  • I've been going to charity shops for years. Think its a throwback to my student days lol. But recently I just having been bothering as much, because I feel that the clothes are getting too expensive :think: You say that charity shops can't compete, but I would have thought that their running costs were minimal, so why can't they compete? The stock is free, the shops are mainly staffed by volunteers for free, they get reduced council rates etc

    I'm not having a pop at you btw Christine. I'm just curious and not had the opportunity to ask someone who works in a charity shop this question before :rotfl:

    You have a point willowthecat but when you look at all costs.......
    Rent, Rates, Electricity, staff pay(employ 1 full time manager & part timer), cost for bags, hangers, telephone, cost for bins emptying (very expensive) & sundries such as volunteers cups of tea (only Joking)

    The profit margain is not much at all & I do wonder how our shop stays open as some days the till may only collect £50, then its minus the above expense. I suppose any profit is a profit!

    So, as you see not much is profit but it must be worth while or these shops would not exist.

    I still feel that you can buy some items cheaper in magor stores but you can get some bargains still in charity shops.

    Keep looking & support the charity shops
  • floss2
    floss2 Posts: 8,030 Forumite
    The Oxfam shop in Lytham near Blackpool has a bridal section.... it's been on TV on the BBC's get- your-family & friends-to-do-your-wedding show, and also "Don't Tell The Bride".

    I've noticed the prices going up in the Cancer Research shops, and also starting to creep up in BHF shops. I've also converted my 2 DS's to charity shopping too - makes my contribution to their uni costs go a bit further!
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