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working children paying keep - how much?

edited 30 November -1 at 1:00AM in Marriage, Relationships & Families
345 replies 61.4K views
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Replies

  • Rikki wrote: »
    Wow! What does he spend his money on now if he isn't paying any board now?

    I think you need to sit down and work out the cost of running your home and agree a figure. With him earning a wage like that I would expect him to contribute his third towards the bills, food, council tax etc
    I hope he does his own washing, cleaning and cooks his parents a nice meal occasionally . ;)
    lol thanks for the reply, he is taking driving lessons and saving up for a new car the rest i think he has a saving account not sure how much he has in. I earn a good wage & have never taken anything off them especially when they came back from uni I told them to pay their student debts off which they did.. it..it's funny i came in from shopping tonight & he had cooked dinner:eek: and gave me £200 maybe he has read this thread :rotfl:
    IT'S ALL ABOUT ME!!!:j:money:
  • carole.uk wrote: »
    two questions
    1st my son came home from uni 2 years ago he now earns after tax etc apprx £1,900 per month . i think it is now time he paid his way he says he will
    2nd my friend is in the same position her son comes home with £300 per week
    How much board money do you think is reasonable to ask for
    any advice appreciaited

    I take home almost as much as your son, I pay my folks 200/month. Both me and my parents feel that's pretty fair, as I'm only in half the time and I don't use much energy etc while I'm asleep, which is mostly what I do at home.

    I feel giving them any more than that would be mollycoddling them and would sheild them from the "real world" too much. I see this as teaching them the value of money - at least, this way, they'll be prepared for what things will cost them when I move out ;)
  • shirlgirl2004shirlgirl2004 Forumite
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    Idiophreak wrote: »
    I take home almost as much as your son, I pay my folks 200/month. Both me and my parents feel that's pretty fair, as I'm only in half the time and I don't use much energy etc while I'm asleep, which is mostly what I do at home.

    I feel giving them any more than that would be mollycoddling them and would sheild them from the "real world" too much. I see this as teaching them the value of money - at least, this way, they'll be prepared for what things will cost them when I move out ;)


    :rotfl: :rotfl: :rotfl: :rotfl:
  • My step daughter's net pay is £800-£900 per month and she's 19 years old.
    We thought £100 per month was more than fair and for her to enjoy her youth still
    Now, she pays zero. What's mine is mine and you can't make me pay attitude (still knows where the food is and has her washing and ironing is done for her.
    I dont think it fair we have to still keep her and be the free loaders. It wound sound that im being unfair if i stop it or even show her the door.:(
  • I would say this depends on circumstance.

    If your son/daughter is at sixth form college/university or similar then I wouldn't charge anything unless you actually need it, at the end of the day it's just going to put them further into debt.

    If they're a graduate or not planning to go to University then I would say their proportion of the bills and food. Rent only if you could/would get a lodger in.

    Then again, when I graduate I fully expect my mum to show me the door and would feel guilty for staying otherwise. Your parents have a responsibility to look after you while you can't do it yourself. Once you're out and working full time I see it as taking the !!!! a bit to stay in their house if you can at all help it.
    Said Aristippus, “If you would learn to be subservient to the king you would not have to live on lentils.”
    Said Diogenes, “Learn to live on lentils and you will not have to be subservient to the king.”[FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica][/FONT]
  • kingfisherbluekingfisherblue Forumite
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    cedar16 wrote: »
    My step daughter's net pay is £800-£900 per month and she's 19 years old.
    We thought £100 per month was more than fair and for her to enjoy her youth still
    Now, she pays zero. What's mine is mine and you can't make me pay attitude (still knows where the food is and has her washing and ironing is done for her.
    I dont think it fair we have to still keep her and be the free loaders. It wound sound that im being unfair if i stop it or even show her the door.:(

    I think £100 a month sounds very generous - where else could she get everything for that price? I certainly wouldn't be doing her washing and ironing though - she is old enough to do that for herself.

    My daughter is 20 and earns a low wage. She is with an agency and work can be a bit hit and miss, but even when she doesn't have much work, she can afford to pay £40 a week. This covers all food, utilities (she showers, uses the washer and drier, TV, computer, etc), broadband, toiletries (but not make up), etc. I don't make a profit from her.

    My daughter also pays council tax. I get full council tax benefit, as I am on income support (I care for my disabled son). However, there is a non-dependent payment as my daughter is working. She pays for this herself, as it would not be a bill I would otherwise receive. She also pays for her phone and her union fees, her car, and her petrol. I paid her insurance, but she is paying me back when she can afford it (starting next month, as she has had extra work because of Christmas :)).

    Some people suggest one third for board, one third saved, and one third expenses, so £100 a month for board is incredibly cheap.
  • I didn't take anything off mine until they were over 18 and in full time work, and then I took 15% of their take home pay.
    My youngest earns close to £800 (gross) each month, so I get nearly £120 of it.
    I know this doesn't truly represent his 'running costs' but I'm a great believer in the principle of kids contributing, and obviously, it's a help to me.
    We've recently had a few conversation about me recently ditching Sky tv, and though I didn't do it for financial reasons, I'm not going to have it back for his benefit, unless he pays for it himself.
    Similarly, when he complains about my shopping habits ( I don't normally buy crisps, chocolate biscuits, fizzy drinks or lager) I give him short shrift and tell him to get himself down to the supermarket to get his own.

    :)
  • There was a "living with the mormons" programme on recently. The kids there worked really hard in chicken farms and joinery, and they paid 90% back ot their parents. They were working for about 60 cents an hour. Sounds about right.
    cedar16 wrote: »
    My step daughter's net pay is £800-£900 per month and she's 19 years old.
    We thought £100 per month was more than fair and for her to enjoy her youth still
    Now, she pays zero. What's mine is mine and you can't make me pay attitude (still knows where the food is and has her washing and ironing is done for her.
    I dont think it fair we have to still keep her and be the free loaders. It wound sound that im being unfair if i stop it or even show her the door.:(
    That's really awful. If she were in my house she'd be finding Rental brochures on the kitchen table/under her bedroom door. WIth the rates circled in red.
    That and an eviction notice.
  • MariscoMarisco Forumite
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    cedar16 wrote: »
    My step daughter's net pay is £800-£900 per month and she's 19 years old.
    We thought £100 per month was more than fair and for her to enjoy her youth still
    Now, she pays zero. What's mine is mine and you can't make me pay attitude (still knows where the food is and has her washing and ironing is done for her.
    I dont think it fair we have to still keep her and be the free loaders. It wound sound that im being unfair if i stop it or even show her the door.:(

    She'd find the toe of my boot up her ****!!! Tell her in no uncertain terms, that if she doesn't start to contribute, then she can go and rent her own place - and mean it! And stop doing her chores, she'll soon get the message when she has no clean clothes to wear!
  • lady1964lady1964 Forumite
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    Two of my dd's are working so we take 20% of their monthly take-home pay from them as a contribution towards the bills etc.

    OH & I are moving overseas next month and leaving the 2 dd's & our younger one (who is at College, doesn't want to leave there or her mates) to live in our home. Mortgage is paid off so there are just the bills & food shopping to pay for. We are also sending money home each month so between the four of us (youngest not contributing due to college) all bills etc paid for and if they are careful with their budgeting when food shopping, there will be around £50 per month left for them to treat themselves to a take-away or meal out should they want to.

    Two dd's have both lived away from home for 2-3 years so both have a good grasp of the cost of running a home and the youngest one is now getting an education in that ready for when she goes to Uni when she's 18.

    If either of my dd's had refused to make any contribution then I would be asking them to close the door behind them as they leave :rotfl:
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