Noticed some changes? You can read all about the improvements we've made on the Forum in our latest announcement. We also have a new set of Forum rules so please take the time to give them a read and familiarise yourself.

working children paying keep - how much?

edited 30 November -1 at 1:00AM in Marriage, Relationships & Families
345 replies 61.4K views
12930313335

Replies

  • OldernotwiserOldernotwiser
    37.4K Posts
    ✭✭✭✭✭
    No wonder teenagers have babies if they think they get £120 pocket money for doing so! She needs to grow up, which you could help by explaining the financial situation she'll be in when she lives independently.
  • SmashingSmashing Forumite
    1.8K Posts
    ✭✭✭
    jane777 wrote: »
    and she thinks if i take any money off her, im greedy!!! Is there anyone in a similar position, so I can show her the posts? She says she has friends in the same position who dont pay their parents anything, I wish i could do this, but cant!!!

    If her friends are getting £120 a week without giving any money to their parents it's no bloody wonder they're all at it. :rolleyes:

    Sod what 'everyone else does' - she needs to grow up. Fast.
  • OldernotwiserOldernotwiser
    37.4K Posts
    ✭✭✭✭✭
    Having said all that, if she's continuing in education (which I sincerely hope she's doing) you should be able to carry on getting CB and CTC for her. She'll be able to claim childcare for this under the Care to Learn scheme.

    This still doesn't mean she'll get £120 per week pocket money though!
  • RikkiRikki Forumite
    21.6K Posts
    ✭✭✭✭✭
    My son has just started house sharing at uni. The two lads he's sharing with don't have a clue about running a house or the costs. My son knows the costs and how to budget. (Thanks to his Mum continually [STRIKE]moaning[/STRIKE]offering advice. :o) The bills are one hell of a shock to the others whose parents are still doing everything for them.:rolleyes:

    Its easier to teach them the cost of living and making them contribute when they live under your own roof. Once you earn a wage you should pay towards your cost of living. It is a valuable lesson to learn and will be a big help when they move out and live in their own house.

    You are actually doing them a favour by taking their money. :cool:
    £2 Coins Savings Club 2012 is £4 :).............................NCFC member No: 00005.........

    ......................................................................TCNC member No: 00008
    NPFM 21
  • Rikki wrote: »
    My son has just started house sharing at uni. The two lads he's sharing with don't have a clue about running a house or the costs. My son knows the costs and how to budget. (Thanks to his Mum continually [STRIKE]moaning[/STRIKE]offering advice. :o) The bills are one hell of a shock to the others whose parents are still doing everything for them.:rolleyes:

    Its easier to teach them the cost of living and making them contribute when they live under your own roof. Once you earn a wage you should pay towards your cost of living. It is a valuable lesson to learn and will be a big help when they move out and live in their own house.

    You are actually doing them a favour by taking their money. :cool:

    That having been said, doesn't it make you question the rest of your point?

    I mean, if he's already learnt this lesson, if he comes back from uni to live, are you still going to be doing him a favour, taking his money to teach him lessons he's already learnt? Or are you just gonna be milking him dry for your holiday fund? ;)
  • RikkiRikki Forumite
    21.6K Posts
    ✭✭✭✭✭
    Idiophreak wrote: »
    That having been said, doesn't it make you question the rest of your point?

    I mean, if he's already learnt this lesson, if he comes back from uni to live, are you still going to be doing him a favour, taking his money to teach him lessons he's already learnt? Or are you just gonna be milking him dry for your holiday fund? ;)

    Re enforced learning. :D

    He probably wouldn't dare come back as I'd charge him too much. Cruises are expensive.:rotfl:
    £2 Coins Savings Club 2012 is £4 :).............................NCFC member No: 00005.........

    ......................................................................TCNC member No: 00008
    NPFM 21
  • SilverbirdSilverbird Forumite
    782 Posts
    Part of the Furniture Combo Breaker Debt-free and Proud!
    ✭✭✭
    Just to add my own experience. When I left home, having just turned 25, I was paying £30 per week with a full-time job of the amount you have listed.

    I was previously (from the day I got a full-time job at 18) paying £35 per week, but my parents lowered it after I wasn't spending much time at home (staying at fiance's a lot).

    I don't think a percentage of the child's salary should be taken, but rather a rough calculation of their particular cost to the family. For instance, I never felt it fair that my sister actually paid less keep than I did (because she had the attitude to argue it) and yet she cost our family more in food (constantly eating various family member's food from fridge), electric (leaving lights and music on) and washing.

    When I have a child of my own and he/she gets a full-time job, I will simply sit down and work out what their proportion of the costs towards bills would be and add a little bit for 'accommodation rent'. I will also stress to my child to save, save, save every penny they can. I saved a lot when I was living with my parents, but if I knew then what I know now, I would have saved it ALL.

    Good luck x x
    Thrilled to be DEBT-FREE as of 26.03.10 :D
    Hubby DEBT-FREE as of 27.03.15 :D

    Debt at LBM (June '07): £8189.19
  • thank you all for your replies, they were what i expected, i just wanted my daughter to see what others would say! Incidentally, i do work fulltime, so she hasnt got the attitude that the world owes her a living from me!!!!!
  • carole.ukcarole.uk Forumite
    1.8K Posts
    two questions
    1st my son came home from uni 2 years ago he now earns after tax etc apprx £1,900 per month . i think it is now time he paid his way he says he will
    2nd my friend is in the same position her son comes home with £300 per week
    How much board money do you think is reasonable to ask for
    any advice appreciaited
    IT'S ALL ABOUT ME!!!:j:money:
  • RikkiRikki Forumite
    21.6K Posts
    ✭✭✭✭✭
    carole.uk wrote: »
    two questions
    1st my son came home from uni 2 years ago he now earns after tax etc apprx £1,900 per month . i think it is now time he paid his way he says he will
    2nd my friend is in the same position her son comes home with £300 per week
    How much board money do you think is reasonable to ask for
    any advice appreciaited

    Wow! What does he spend his money on now if he isn't paying any board now?

    I think you need to sit down and work out the cost of running your home and agree a figure. With him earning a wage like that I would expect him to contribute his third towards the bills, food, council tax etc
    I hope he does his own washing, cleaning and cooks his parents a nice meal occasionally . ;)
    £2 Coins Savings Club 2012 is £4 :).............................NCFC member No: 00005.........

    ......................................................................TCNC member No: 00008
    NPFM 21
This discussion has been closed.
Latest News and Guides

New plastic £50 note in circulation

Inventor and codebreaker Alan Turing is pictured

MSE News

TV MoneySaving tricks

How to save on Sky, Netflix, Now TV, Prime Video and more

MSE Guides

Pret subscription loophole

Get a month's worth of free smoothies, frappes, coffee etc

MSE Deals