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Great Rural MoneySaving Hunt

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  • Frugaldom
    Frugaldom Posts: 6,939 Forumite
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    I like the bartering idea, but it's a bit confusing trying to factor them into the accounts when calculating the hard cash side of things. (I'm not talking a dozen eggs for a bag of potatoes, I'm talking business transactions - I'll fix your car if you'll top my paddock type thing.) :rotfl:

    I was going to compile a list of things that rural life doesn't provide have but decided it's far easier to say that urban cannot be compared with rural. If you are planning on moving to the country, remember that there is no hurry once you get there. If you can't live a slow pace without takeaways, shopping and nightlife, you will hate it. If you expect digital signals, mains gas, mains sewage and online supermarket shopping, forget it.

    Country roads for drivers - you ALWAYS need to have an idea of what's around the next bend and it is CRUCIAL that you know milking times, as herds are often walked from field to farm and the regular mode of farm transport is a tractor or a quad bike with a collie dog sat at the back. Once you get going, there are still the milk tankers and logging lorries. And worst of all, if there are youngsters with cars, open roads are race tracks. I prefer not to own a car (because I don't own a paddock?) :rotfl:

    PS: I have never lived in or near the city, but I don't live out in the sticks at the moment either. We are very civilised here - we have mains sewage, a post office/newsagent, a part time bank and a Co-op. :D

    Back to correct this old post - We are now back in the sticks, single track road, no buses, no street lighting, wheelie bin 1.2miles away from the house, no mains sewage, private water supply, no shops, an open fire, no gas or oil and still no paddock! :rotfl:
    I reserve the right not to spend.
    The less I spend, the more I can afford.


    Frugal living challenge - living on £4000 in 2024
  • Frugaldom
    Frugaldom Posts: 6,939 Forumite
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    MoJo wrote: »
    I've been wondering how to find out about this with the Forestry Commission - any pointers?

    Find out all you need to know here. The Forestry Commission also offers training seminars for chainsaw use, as you need a licence to operate one on forestry land. Hope this helps :)
    I reserve the right not to spend.
    The less I spend, the more I can afford.


    Frugal living challenge - living on £4000 in 2024
  • MoJo
    MoJo Posts: 542 Forumite
    First Post First Anniversary Combo Breaker
    Ta. I've bounced around their site before but not found what I was looking for. Have to allocate some spare time to investigate it further.
  • V_Chic_Chick
    V_Chic_Chick Posts: 2,441 Forumite
    I don't have a dog, but I have noticed that the local feed merchants sell dog & cat food. I would imagine that this is a lot cheaper than city pet shops, but they all come in 20kg bags from the look of things. I do, however, buy my chicken food there (which has gone up from £6.50/20kg to £7.53/20kg in the space of 6 weeks!!!) which is a lot cheaper than the pet shop in town.

    Sawmills will often sell dust extracted wood shavings by the shrink-wrapped bale. These are really cheap (~£6 each) and they last me over a year with my 2 chickens in a coop which is ~1m square. I've seen the pet shop get exactly the same stuff delivered, and they then divide it up and sell it on for about 20x that price!!!
  • I use a wesite called https://www.boilerjuice.com for buying oil that seems to get better prices (bulk ordering I guess) and also groups orders together by postcode to save money. So if you don't have enough neighbours to form a consortium this site sort of does it for you.

    This is my first post so if I should not have mentioned the website sorry!
  • Seakay
    Seakay Posts: 4,265 Forumite
    Name Dropper First Post First Anniversary Combo Breaker
    hawks wrote: »
    I use a wesite called www.boilerjuice.com for buying oil that seems to get better prices (bulk ordering I guess) and also groups orders together by postcode to save money. So if you don't have enough neighbours to form a consortium this site sort of does it for you.

    This is my first post so if I should not have mentioned the website sorry!

    Hello hawks! This site is all about sharing information, so mentioning the website is fine!
  • Steel_2
    Steel_2 Posts: 1,649 Forumite
    First Anniversary Combo Breaker
    Ditto what many others have said on here already.

    Local farms are a great source of good quality food. Our local egg farm charges £1.60 for a dozen MASSIVE eggs, many of them double yolkers during the first few months of the laying year. I don't think I could beat that by keeping my own. We have a farm that offers a veggie box scheme no more than a mile from our house.

    We chop up wood from felled or storm-damaged trees during the year for our fire during the winter and a local gardener occassionally drops large tree prunings off to us as well. It all gets stocked in a big coal bunker (which we were given by my father, a previous 'city dweller' who found the reality of having an open fire in the country didn't match the dream and quickly got a gas fire fitted instead:rotfl: ).The wood ash goes on the garden.

    There's a lot of produce changing hands over back garden fences, the odd brace of pheasant and rabbit hanging up in garages, and bartering of jobs (with me I'll do hanging baskets and large cakes for lawn mowing).

    By the way, all those who buy meat direct from farmers, how much are you paying for lambs, pigs and cows? I've recently been offerred half a young lamb for £35 and I've no idea what the going rate is?
    "carpe that diem"
  • kingkano
    kingkano Posts: 1,977 Forumite
    Name Dropper First Post First Anniversary Combo Breaker
    Steel wrote: »
    By the way, all those who buy meat direct from farmers, how much are you paying for lambs, pigs and cows? I've recently been offerred half a young lamb for £35 and I've no idea what the going rate is?

    That's about right. I get a whole one for £65 on average. (think my half in autumn was £40). It usually is priced per kg and depends on the final weight - as they do vary lol.

    A pig is a much more considerable investment (much bigger) haha. You need a decent size freezer. I think the last lot were £80 for a half pig.

    I've not found local beef yet sadly :(
  • ViksB
    ViksB Posts: 329 Forumite
    Steel wrote: »
    By the way, all those who buy meat direct from farmers, how much are you paying for lambs, pigs and cows? I've recently been offerred half a young lamb for £35 and I've no idea what the going rate is?
    We sell lambs and pigs to friends, family and neighbours and last year we charged £35-40 for half a lamb and £90-100 for half a pig, however costs have risen alot especially for pigs and that price will rise this year.

    Viks
  • Frugaldom
    Frugaldom Posts: 6,939 Forumite
    Name Dropper First Post Photogenic First Anniversary
    Shared shopping saves money all year round. :T
    Going BOGOF shopping (bulk buying the BOGOF items) and then splitting the grocery bill to make everything half price. This can be done anywhere, all you need is a friend or family member who uses the same stuff you do. The supermarkets seem to have curbed this and now restrict the numbers of discounted items you can buy, but I suspect that was on account of the restaurant, takeaway and corner shop owners and not us frugalites.

    Not being near a shopping centre means you rely more on Internet shopping, but many of the bargains are subject to minimum order values. I've organised several 'virtual shopping trips' to submit combined orders and make the most of free delivery. Pre widespread Internet use, I assumed it was normal for folks to do a phone-around letting each other know who was offering what bargains and who was needing what from the farmers' market. Bear in mind that I only visited my first 24 hour Tesco Extra last year! Friend and I were so shocked that we wanted to book our holiday there! :rotfl:

    Another great tip. Anytime you get the chance to venture into town, ALWAYS, ALWAYS have one of those reuseable cool bags and some frozen icepacks at the ready. This way you can take advantage of frozen or chilled offers if you happen to spot an Iceland, Farmfoods or any other well known stores that sell discounted foods. I could have kicked myself so often for missing out on great offers simply because they'd be thawed by the time I got home!

    Summer savings - dry the washing outside and cook dinner on a BBQ. You'll need all the savings you can get to pay the electricity during the winter :D
    I reserve the right not to spend.
    The less I spend, the more I can afford.


    Frugal living challenge - living on £4000 in 2024
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