Air Source Heat Pumps

24567176

Replies

  • Hi, I would say that it's about as loud as a modern washing machine on spin cycle, I guess about the same as a vehicle idling, but higher pitch...it is basically just a big fan.

    In terms of heating, it has performed ok, the house isn't roasting, probably not as hot as a gas system, but can achieve 22deg C fairly easily, but think i'd need to upgrade the insulation and windows to get any higher...also, I think that it would work better with underfloor heating in the living room as it is a large room and the radiators struggle a bit, especially when the outside door keep getting opened!!!

    The hot water tank is purely for hot water, so the size of that would depend on how many showers/baths you have.

    Yes you can turn it off.. you control it just like a normal heating system with timed on/off periods with a thermostat to control temperature.

    Would I recommend it? Well, that's a difficult question to answer as it depends on what the alternatives are...we were unable to get gas, so it was either ashp, gshp, storage heaters, oil, lpg or solid fuel, and I think it is preferable out of those options taking into account cost, fuel availability and comfort levels.
  • Jo.GJo.G Forumite
    190 Posts
    Samtheman1k,
    Can I ask, why did you choose an Air Source Heat Pump as opposed to a Ground Source Heat Pump? I have only just started looking at these and have only looked at one website (Ice Energy?) Am I right in thinking that a GSHP wouldnt be as noisy as an ASHP? Please forgive me if this is a stupid question, I'm a total novice stuck with old storage heaters! I am clued up thanks to other members (especially Cardew!) on this site that electric heating is the most expensive way to heat my home but my storage heaters (the ones that work) just dont keep my house warm in the evenings and in my lounge we now rely on a cheap convector heater. We live on a corner plot with quite a bit of garden on 3 sides so am wondering if a GSHP would be better for us? Do you have any idea if these are more expensive than the the ASHP?
  • Hi, I didn't go for a Ground source mainly because we live on the side of a hill and you can't access our garden with a vehicle so we'd have to dig the trench/borehole by hand. EDIT: so in essence, it comes down to cost/hassle/time etc. I would of gone for a ground source if it was more practical.
  • HitstirrerHitstirrer Forumite
    7 Posts
    Part of the Furniture First Post Combo Breaker
    Forumite
    Hi,
    I've followed the Air Heat Pump chat with interest. The noise sems to be the main drawback and siting of the unit. I realise that the pipe runs ideally should be short but is this purely on insulation grounds or some other reason?
    The only practical place that I could site a unit that size is some 30mtrs from the house. Surely with the run pipes placed inside a heavily insulated duct of some kind the heat loss could be minimised. I could easily construct a duct of say 400mm square cross section with the run pipe central to 300mm dense polystyrene surrounding it. Apart from the inconvenience of ensuring adequate insulation for the pipe deliving heat are there other reasons why a remote pump wouldnt work?
  • samtheman1ksamtheman1k Forumite
    464 Posts
    Part of the Furniture Combo Breaker
    Minimising the heat loss between the HP and the house is absolutely vital, but I guess if you used massive amounts of insulation it could work. The only other reason I can think of is the power of the pump that moves the water between the thermal store and the HP. If you are having to pump that amount of water then it may need upgrading, or an additional pump adding inline. You'd have to take advice on that as I don't really know if it would be a problem. I wouldn't like to pay for the the cost of the copper pipe for the 30m run though!
  • Ken68Ken68 Forumite
    6.8K Posts
    Part of the Furniture 1,000 Posts Energy Saving Champion Home Insurance Hacker!
    Wow, Sam, the way to go.....Last night Channel 4 Grand Designs, was an GSHP system embedded in the piles of the new build feeding the ground floor heating and a ASHP system capturing the heat from a pipe run along the driveway.
    On again More 4 Monday 7th April. In addition he had pipes IN the roof capturing the sun heat.
    http://propertyauctionaction.co.uk/property_programmes/More4_Grand_Designs.html
  • Hi again,
    Just back from the Build and renovate show at NEC armed with many brochures, I've had many questions answered but now have new ones. Above E7 usage is mentioned, and was brought up by a salesman of pumps (Trianco, I think) but he waffled rather than clarified how and what for. He used the word storage of heat produced but didn't elucidate the point.
    Other displays stated that pumps could be sited in the loft - why is this not generally considered when it would elminate the problems of distance from the tank, and the air always warmer?
    We already have solar hot water and wonder how they will work together - complementary or otherwise?
    On a completely different tack I am interested in the effect on the house value. At present the storage rads will put us at a big disadvantage in this buyers market, but is Joe Public ready for new technology? Might they be just as put off? It will give us a much better environmental rating, and does what I personaly want, but we will need to relocate next year.
    thanks
  • butemanbuteman Forumite
    32 Posts
    Minimising the heat loss between the HP and the house is absolutely vital, but I guess if you used massive amounts of insulation it could work. The only other reason I can think of is the power of the pump that moves the water between the thermal store and the HP. If you are having to pump that amount of water then it may need upgrading, or an additional pump adding inline. You'd have to take advice on that as I don't really know if it would be a problem. I wouldn't like to pay for the the cost of the copper pipe for the 30m run though!

    Yes you can do whatever you want. It comes down to cost.
    There are some fairly simply rules to this.
    1/ The higher the difference in temperature between your water and the outside the faster you loose heat.
    2/ The thicker the insulation the lower the amount of heat loss.
    3/ The better the insulation properties of your insulation the lower the heat loss.
    4/ more insulation (2) better insulation (3) mean more cost.

    5/ The longer the pipes the more work the pump has to do to move the water along.
    6/ The larger the diameter of the pipes the less power needed to move the water around.
    7/ The smoother the pipes and the fewer bends or joints in the pipes the less the power needed to move the water around.

    I think you should be able to use plastic pipe. It's what we have in our central heating system except within a metre of the gas boiler. it is probably cheaper, less prone to corrosion and better insulation than copper pipes.

    So altogether I guess it's a case of working out what it will cost for each option and choosing what you feel would be best overall.
  • I read an article about these some time ago and read that they are fitted in a large majority of houses on the continent:confused:. What are the major pluses and minuses (condensed)---- I take it that the two biggies are :
    Plus -- Cheaper Heating (less emissions)
    Minus -- Cost of fitting and installation (payback time).
    Are these practical in inner city terrace houses? Cost to buy and fit for a 3 bed house??
    tribuo veneratio ut alius quod they mos veneratio vos
  • Rabiddog wrote: »
    I read an article about these some time ago and read that they are fitted in a large majority of houses on the continent:confused:. What are the major pluses and minuses (condensed)---- I take it that the two biggies are :
    Plus -- Cheaper Heating (less emissions)
    Minus -- Cost of fitting and installation (payback time).
    Are these practical in inner city terrace houses? Cost to buy and fit for a 3 bed house??

    Pluses: Easy to install, quick to install, cheaper to heat a house than using a standard electric system, less reliant on middle eastern oil ;)
    Minuses: Noisey, more expensive to run than gas, expensive to purchase.
This discussion has been closed.
LATEST MSE NEWS AND GUIDES