DPD Local Failed to Deliver Time sensitive Perishable Parcel advice needed

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Comments

  • the_lunatic_is_in_my_head
    the_lunatic_is_in_my_head Posts: 7,529 Forumite
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    edited 16 January at 9:20PM
    OP have you had a Google to see where your local depot is and if you can find a traditional landline number for it?

    If you can't but find a landline for one nearby, make out you've got the wrong depot and see if they'll give you the right number. 

    If you can get the correct depot on the phone and nag them each time something goes wrong, the service might start to improve.

    You can also Google "CEO email" and search that site for DPD, the contact email there will be answered (took a week last time I emailed to get an answer) and again just message the person who responded to your first contact  every time a delivery goes wrong.

    I'd bet eventually they'll get the message and the drivers will be extra careful with your parcels. 
  • Jonboy_1984
    Jonboy_1984 Posts: 1,218 Forumite
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    Thanks. I understand what your saying about supplier having a choice of courier they could use, hadn't really thought about it that way. But they don't give customers any choice over which courier just DPD.

    Sadly too many companies are playing  the blame the carrier and pretend it's nothing to do with them game.
  • RefluentBeans
    RefluentBeans Posts: 895 Forumite
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    Thanks. I understand what your saying about supplier having a choice of courier they could use, hadn't really thought about it that way. But they don't give customers any choice over which courier just DPD.

    Sadly too many companies are playing  the blame the carrier and pretend it's nothing to do with them game.
    Until delivery companies take on some risk they aren’t incentivised to do better jobs. Currently the law places risk with the retailer until the package is delivered to the customer (and this exact point is and has been debated on this board before - like with safezones like a porch or delivery to a neighbour by default). But this is an old fashioned notion that Gary from the electrics shop will deliver your TV to you himself, and doesn’t account for the reality that most of the online purchases made are delivered by 5 couriers (RM/ParcelForce, Evri, Yodel/DHL, DPD, and the rest like FedEx). 

    The issue with them getting assigned risk (like the point to which they successfully deliver the package to the named recipient or their named nominated recipient) is that the consumer risk getting passed between two companies neither of which want to accept responsibility- but I think that already happens. The CRA was written in 2015 and used a lot of the older concepts. I think it needs to be modified to 2024 world, post covid and certainly post-high street. 
  • ArbitraryRandom
    ArbitraryRandom Posts: 2,452 Forumite
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    If I understand what you're suggesting, I'm not sure I agree - the customer has a clear contract with the seller... the law protects the customer by giving them that single person to chase and hold accountable for damages. Making it so the liability is split between the carrier and seller would just make things more difficult for the customer as neither would accept responsibility/would blame the other. 

    With the existing arrangements, the contract between the seller and the carrier is a b2b arrangement, subject to the terms agreed by both parties. So the carrier CAN be held liable by the seller, if it's in the contract, but such services are generally more expensive than the cheap carriers often used. That's fine if the seller is prepared to absorb losses as part of doing business (or has appropriate insurance). 

    They can even charge more for a customer being able to choose the carrier they prefer (one company I order from gives free delivery over a threshold via their choice of carrier, or I can pick between 3 options for an additional payment of £5). 

    My impractical suggestion would be a dispute resolution service for purchases from UK companies where a card/credit facility was used for payment (set up like the PayPal dispute system as a largely automated process with both parties uploading their evidence) - basically extending and formalising/centralising the chargeback and S75 processes to include a wider range of lower value claims. Plus some regulation/protection when it comes to services like Klarna... 

    tl;dr rather than saying the carrier should share liability under the consumer's contract, it should be easier for customers to enforce their rights without the hassle of small claims for what are often relatively small costs.


    I'm not an early bird or a night owl; I’m some form of permanently exhausted pigeon.
  • the_lunatic_is_in_my_head
    the_lunatic_is_in_my_head Posts: 7,529 Forumite
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    edited 17 January at 10:28AM
    I think the couriers should be regulated, currently Royal Mail have service obligations to meet although I assume they are doing their best to avoid them (AFAIK things like Tracked aren't included, it's just the traditional services). 

    If the consumer could complain to an ombudsman, whether they are a sender or recipient, chances are services levels would improve. 

    The issue is that consumer rights don't particularly exist with the direct intention of protecting the consumer, they exist to inspire confidence which in turn increases spending which keeps the economy flowing. The fact we consumers get protection is really a happy bonus. 

    A lot of markets are heading towards a handful of companies having most of the market doing everything as cheap as possible, quality and service are going out the window but people keep buying because stuff is cheap. 

    It's not good for us or our planet but it is good for businesses and either the government supports this as they think it best or businesses have enough influence over government to prevent widespread change. 

    With that in mind when you look at anything that would improve the situation it's going to cost which goes against the general status quo, personally I think quality should be better with higher prices and with less stuff consumed but if anything we are sadly heading in the other direction. 

    99.9% of the time the level of service depends on the person doing the last mile, if the person bringing the parcels to your door is good, the service will be good, if they are paid peanuts and as a result don't care the service is likely to be poor. Better pay and working conditions would be great but that goes back to the above.

    We're rural where we are and whilst there is one own brand company who delivers for a few couriers, most still use their own depots, drivers, etc. Given scale is paramount in this world of cheap as chips I'm very surprised the couriers haven't clubbed together for rural areas and run that last mile out of one joint depot, the savings on cost could be used to pay the staff more, although of course if they did save it's doubtful the staff would be the ones benefiting from that money.... . 
  • ArbitraryRandom
    ArbitraryRandom Posts: 2,452 Forumite
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    edited 17 January at 12:04PM
    I think the couriers should be regulated, currently Royal Mail...
    I like the idea - but realistically when was the last time you heard of someone going to POSTRS :D 

    Re your last point - here we have one guy that does most of the last mile stuff (he's yodel, evri, amazon, uk parcel and he also does ubereats if you fancy a snack :D), so if you're a regular customer and trying to find a parcel you can drop him a tex and he'll update you if it's in his boot. 
    I'm not an early bird or a night owl; I’m some form of permanently exhausted pigeon.
  • Jonboy_1984
    Jonboy_1984 Posts: 1,218 Forumite
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    Frankly 95% of carrier issues could be resolved simply by them rolling back 10 years and answering the £&*(9’j phone at a local depot level….either to their customer or the addressee of the goods…
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