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Cheapest Petrol & Diesel Discussion Area

edited 15 June 2010 at 10:06AM in Motoring
630 replies 149.1K views
1356763

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  • Hi all
    As a PDI (potential Driving Instructor) I am always looking for ways to cut back on my fuel bills.
    The way to teach driving is now ECO-FREINDLY DRIVING.
    On the link below is an article on how to drive in that way (free to download)

    http://www.smartdriving.co.uk/
  • I have a good question about cheapest petrol prices, one which has confused me for a while now...

    My local Shell petrol station has a price of 98.9p per litre, which is probably one of the cheapest in the area (there's an Esso about 7 miles aware at 97.9p but that's probably pointless money-saving unless I happen to go there, so I'll ignore this one for now). The local Tesco near to where I work, and which I drive by on a pretty much daily basis, is 101.9p per litre. There is also a Sainsburys at 99.9p too, near to where I live.

    The question is: Is it better to pay 101.9p with Tesco and get Clubcard points, or 99.9p and Nectar points, or 98.9p and get no rewards?

    This is regardless of any credit card cashback deals, as I can use a credit card to get 1%/2%/6% off at any of these, so the comparison is not needed.

    I look forward to hearing from you all, to hear your opinions, and apologies if there is a better place to post this (I haven't seen one yet)!

    Thanks,
    Whowants2brich
    Having fun trying to save money without going over the top and living on budget food all the time...
  • anewmananewman Forumite
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    Shell has a card reward scheme too. See their website.
  • I have found that cruise control is the best mechanical fuel saver, 25 years back I fitted a cruise control on a 1.3 Escort and I cruised all the way round U.K at 50 Miles per hour and I returned a consumption figure of 50 miles a gallon which was way better than I or anyone could have done without Cruise control. I am guessing that I saved about 20 - 25 % fuel costs. Having said all that if you dont have cruise control the best saver overall is a light right foot. Just to put a few non mechanical minded people right, the highest gear is not always the most economical, no doubt someone will say I am wrong but to put it simply, if you go up a hill in 5th or 4th with your foot way down pumping fuel into your engine you would be better off dropping a gear and driving with a lighter right foot, Remember, The accellerator is a TAP, the less you open it the less £££s it costs you.
  • fletcher1985fletcher1985 Forumite
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    diesel is now £1.10 per liter and petrol is £1.08 per liter, they say they are putting the prices up to get people using public transport but they know or a fact that people wont and they will get more money its just a way of making more money out of us. just like cigerettes they kill you but they keep selling them and putting the prices up.
  • WigWig Forumite
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    anewman wrote: »
    Only way I see to take advantage of this is to go to petrolprices.com and look for the cheapest petrol near Tesco, then buy petrol at tesco and get the refund there and then. Driving back to Tesco would negate the value of the refund unless you were going anyway. Seems like too much messing about to me for what chances are won't be anymore than £1.

    If only we could get loads of Jerry cans cheap and stock up...

    Tesco doesn't have a price policy on petrol anylonger....What refund are you getting? double the difference? when was the last time you asked for a tesco petrol refund? and what about the old "we'll lower our prices to match".
  • WigWig Forumite
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    Crabman wrote: »
    Coasting in neutral means you aren't in proper control of the car. If your vehicle has a direct fuel injection it will typically cut out when, for example, going down a hill in gear. When coasting in neutral, fuel is needed to keep the engine idling over.

    I don't know about you but I'm always in perfect control of my car when coasting in neutral, downhill or otherwise. Also I have never had nor heard of any car cutting out because of coasting in neutral, the engine needs fuel to idle and it gets that fuel via the fuel injection system.

    I would however, point out that coasting downhill in neutral (depending on the hill and road layout ofcourse) will put extra wear on your brake pads. You don't use any extra fuel by going down hill in an appropriate gear (with foot off the accelerator) you don't need to brake as much - if at all.
  • CrabmanCrabman Forumite, Board Guide
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    Wig wrote: »
    I don't know about you but I'm always in perfect control of my car when coasting in neutral, downhill or otherwise. Also I have never had nor heard of any car cutting out because of coasting in neutral, the engine needs fuel to idle and it gets that fuel via the fuel injection system.

    I would however, point out that coasting downhill in neutral (depending on the hill and road layout ofcourse) will put extra wear on your brake pads. You don't use any extra fuel by going down hill in an appropriate gear (with foot off the accelerator) you don't need to brake as much - if at all.
    I was under the impression that a direct injection fuel system cuts out when fuel isn't needed, e.g. down a hill in gear with foot off the accelerator?

    About being in control, I think this has something to do with control in the event of an emergency, e.g. coasting in neutral you are relying solely on brakes in stopping, whereas in gear you can use engine braking too.
    I'm a Board Guide on the Savings & Investments, ISAs & Tax-free Savings, Public Transport & Cycling, Motoring and Parking Fines, Tickets & Parking Boards. I volunteer to help get your forum questions answered and keep the forum running smoothly. Board Guides are not moderators & don't read every post. If you spot a contentious or illegal post then please report it to [email protected] (it's not part of my role to deal with this). Views are mine and not the official line of MoneySavingExpert.com

  • WigWig Forumite
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    The question is: Is it better to pay 101.9p with Tesco and get Clubcard points, or 99.9p and Nectar points, or 98.9p and get no rewards?

    IMO

    It is better to get 98.9 with no reward scheme- but Anewman just pointed out shell does rewards.

    Tesco clubcard gives you 1p back per £ (near enough per litre)
    Nectar points vary in value according to what you are buying but average out at about 2 points = 1p,
    BP & Sainsbury's petrol earns you 1 nectar point per litre - which works out at half a pence cashback per litre.
  • Wig wrote: »
    I don't know about you but I'm always in perfect control of my car when coasting in neutral, downhill or otherwise. Also I have never had nor heard of any car cutting out because of coasting in neutral, the engine needs fuel to idle and it gets that fuel via the fuel injection system.

    I would however, point out that coasting downhill in neutral (depending on the hill and road layout ofcourse) will put extra wear on your brake pads. You don't use any extra fuel by going down hill in an appropriate gear (with foot off the accelerator) you don't need to brake as much - if at all.

    You're wrong on a couple of counts.

    Firstly, you are not meant to 'coast' regardless of whether or not you feel you have control of the car. This is covered in the Highway code and there has been a lot of discussion on this topic on the car enthusiast website Pistonheads, specifically between advanced and Police Class 1 drivers. Basically, you do not have as much control in neutral as you do in gear, if you feel this is not correct I welcome you to join in the discussion on the Pistonheads forum with the various highly qualified private and police drivers who will explain in more detail the point I am making.

    Secondly, modern cars will cut all fuel to the cylinders when in gear in a situation where the engine is under no load (ie, going down hill). (This is what the poster means by 'cutting out' - not the engine physically stopping.) If you coasted for say, 1 mile - you will use zero fuel over that mile. If you were in neutral, the car would be using fuel at a rate which is enough to keep the engine ticking over at the idle speed. So over the mile example, you would use a small amount of fuel. In addition, as you so rightly point out, you will also be harder on the brake pads.

    Hope this clarifies the points for you.
    Savings - £18,500 @ 5.22% Average

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