Once your kids are earning should you charge them Housekeeping?

145791016

Replies

  • without a shadow of a doubt, charge. Teaches valuable lessons, helps budget, and definitely gives a good idea of the value of money whilst there is still a bit of a cushion there if they mess it up a bit. My Dad was very strict about it, and I had holiday jobs from 14. I left home at 17 (didn't go far, parents were too lovely to be too far from!), and organised the whole renting with friends, budgeting etc etc - they were HOPELESS having been mollycoddled all the way through. there's no need to be mean about it, but firm, and clear is a real lesson x
    £3k back from Natwest:beer:, approx 29% saved on major debts due to Martin's tarting advice and LOTS more (inc weight loss too! ... Martin's a Marvel:j Long healthy good life, great times, and happiness :rotfl: x
  • My mum used to let us keep the first paypacket, then she used to ask for about a 1/3 of wages.
    I remember my brother complaining once that he was paying too much so my mum wrote a list of all the bills and worked out his share, which was far more than she was charging him, he didn't complain after that :D
    If everyone cared and nobody cried, if everyone loved and nobody lied, if everyone shared and swallowed their pride then we'd see the day when nobody died.
    ROCK IT DON'T STOP IT!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    BE GOOD OR BE GOOD AT IT!!!!!!!!!!!!
    What's worth the prize is always worth the fight
  • Hi Jacks:) i take housekeeping from my children and there are only two left at home now. They are 23 and 24 and i take £50 a week from them both. I think it is very very important to teach young ones that they have to pay their way in life and it has always been this way in our home. Nothing is free and i think we do our children no favouirs at all by not doing so. It depends on how much they earn, of course and if they do not earn too much say then it should be worked out that they have to pay something which is fair. I have seen young people really not having a clue about paying their way and they have no idea of the cost of things. My older children who live away from home(two are married and two live in their own homes and all of them work) and understand the value of money because of how they were brought up to understand that it is important to budget, and pay bills on time. You help no one by letting them away with contributing to the cost of food and bills and rent etc. I feel very strongly about this topic:) I think it should be taught in schools as part of the ciriculem(sorry can't spell this word) :)
    Do a little kindness every day.;)
  • code-a-holiccode-a-holic Forumite
    1.4K Posts
    ✭✭✭
    Definatly agree you should charge. I starting paying for any fuel my parents used to ferry me about from 13 yrs old when i started as a waitress. I then paid for any phone calls i made then i decided to start buying all my own clothes. I was in a very good paying weekend job mind. At 16 i started at a job full time and paid my mum about a 1/3 of my wages until i left home. It gave me a good understanding of finances for when i moved in to my own place at 18. My husband moved out of his parents home at 22 with no clue about finances as never had to pay his way.
  • Definitely charge them something. but be careful that they are still financially better off working than not. It really depends on whether or not they will get the money from parents anyway if they don't work.

    If it's a part time job because they are still in education/training, you should take some money from them, but you could add a sweetener; maybe they cut back on some chores to reflect that they don't have as much free time anymore. Then you can use their money to hire a cleaner/gardener/chef(?!), or pay a younger child more allowance for picking up the slack. If you are going to cut off an allowance, stop paying their phone bill AND take some of their wages, make sure that they have enough left over to make it seem worth their while otherwise they might slip into a 'why bother when I can have have the same for nothing' attitude.

    If it's a full time job then it's no mercy (I'm assuming that if they aren't in education/training then they will be sitting around freeloading). Work it out so all adults pay the same percentage of their wage on bills (but not the mortgage) and charge, say, £50 a week on top in rent. They will understand that their consumption of fuel and food will cost them more, and they will get a realistic idea of how much of their wage is really their own to spend.

    When I was at uni (99-04) working part time I paid £100 a month to my mum, and all my bills (phone, contact lenses etc) were my own. When I gave up my job to concentrate on finals, I was so in the habit if meeting this payment I used Christmas money, travel expenses, student loan and a tax rebate to come up with the money. It taught me forward planning and how to be cunning with cash.
  • Maybe this could be something that Martin takes up on one of his many TV appearances? When he talks about financial stuff folks listen, so it could be a powerful message to get out there. x Claire
    PS - am not after anyting lol!
    £3k back from Natwest:beer:, approx 29% saved on major debts due to Martin's tarting advice and LOTS more (inc weight loss too! ... Martin's a Marvel:j Long healthy good life, great times, and happiness :rotfl: x
  • My brother takes home £1000 per month and pays my parents NOTHING. Mum does everything for him and dad can't bear the idea of taking money from him. I paid my way when I lived with them (about a third) but my sisters didn't really pay anything either. I couldn't live with that.

    I told my mum about this thread and she is thinking of suggesting a small amount to start with, my brother has no real expenses apart from keeping his BMW on the road and mum and dad are struggling since my dad recently retired and my mum gets paid peanuts at her part time job.

    Sarah x
  • margaretclaremargaretclare Forumite
    10.8K Posts
    ✭✭✭✭✭
    My brother takes home £1000 per month and pays my parents NOTHING. Mum does everything for him and dad can't bear the idea of taking money from him. I paid my way when I lived with them (about a third) but my sisters didn't really pay anything either. I couldn't live with that.

    I told my mum about this thread and she is thinking of suggesting a small amount to start with, my brother has no real expenses apart from keeping his BMW on the road and mum and dad are struggling since my dad recently retired and my mum gets paid peanuts at her part time job.

    Sarah x

    Try working out what your brother would have to pay if he decided to live somewhere else - even a bedsit costs money. Then there's use of hot water, food, someone to do his washing and ironing and cooking, use of phone, use of furniture, bedding, a whole lot of things.

    Your parents are being taken for a ride. If brother can afford to run a BMW then he has no right to imagine that he can live for free. What does he think it is - the Savoy? I would kick his lazy a*se out of the door unless he paid the going rate.

    Margaret
    [FONT=Times New Roman, serif]Æ[/FONT]r ic wisdom funde, [FONT=Times New Roman, serif]æ[/FONT]r wear[FONT=Times New Roman, serif]ð[/FONT] ic eald.
    Before I found wisdom, I became old.
  • I agree Margaretclare - to be fair he is a lovely hardworking lad who is so quiet and has never given my parents any trouble, just abit spoilt I think. He has to accept that you have to pay your way though, he has had it easy for so long ...

    Sarah x
  • haliahalia Forumite
    450 Posts
    yes, after the age of 18 I definitly would (as long as they had some cash)! between 16 and 18 I'd think about it, if they were earning f/t I'd probably charge.

    Its about them recognising that as an adult they would be expected to contribute to the running expenses of a household.

    I'd say look at the rate for an all-in (bills inc) bedsit and charge 1/2-2/3 of that plus 1/3 (assuming they are the third adult) of food bills.

    So round here you can get a bedsit with all bills for £35 a week, I'd charge £15/week + £15/week for food. I'd expect my son to pitch in with household jobs as well, take his turn cooking/washing etc and iron his own clothes.

    Mind you he will be taking a turn tidying, cooking and washing up well before he is 18!!

    I knew someone at work once, 28 yrs old still lived at home, didn't pay rent or anything, earning f/t wages and her mum still cooked her tea/did her washing!!!

    thats bloody exploitation!
    DEBT: £500 credit card £800 Bank overdraft
    £14 Weekly food budget



This discussion has been closed.
Latest MSE News and Guides