Once your kids are earning should you charge them Housekeeping?

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  • i think that housekeeping should come out when they're working full time, but not part time and still at school.
    :A
  • caelercaeler Forumite
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    Definately yes regardless of earnings, everybody in the household should make a contribution.

    I was expected to contribute as soon as I got a full time job, I paid £200 per month and was paid £12,000 per year.

    Even if your only going to charge a nominal sum £50 per month, or what ever its important for everybody to get into the idea of paying rent/bills and learning to budget. Its great if this can be done in a caring environment rather than a few years later and it all failing apart!
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  • Jacks_xxxJacks_xxx Forumite
    3.9K Posts
    tweeter wrote: »
    Surely when you're considering getting knocked up, you should think about the bosses who will take your sproggs off your hands when the time comes.
    And as you'll have been preparing your kids at great expense, why quibble about their living expenses, when you could be demanding from the bosses for services rendered. After all you haven't been doing all this preparation for nothing - then again in this topsy turvy world.;)

    Yeah!

    His boss should be paying ME - I taught him everything he knows! ;)

    I should've got BAE or somebody to sponsor his childhood and then turned him over to them when he left school. :D

    You might be onto something there hon.

    Love Jacks xxx :D
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  • Jacks_xxxJacks_xxx Forumite
    3.9K Posts
    :wave: Hi everyone,

    Just to let you know....My son is paying £200 a month keep, and saving £500 a month for a deposit on a house - which still leaves him £466 a month to play with. (social life / driving lessons / car expenses /clothes etc.)

    I'm pretty happy with this arrangement.

    Thanks SO much to everybody who helped us to work this out.

    Love Jacks xxx :D
    Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted. Einstein
  • Depends if how much they are earning,my son has started a training course which pays the education maintenance allowance of £30 per week and I don't take anything from him.But when hes in full time work then I will as there will be council tax etc I'll also loose my tax credits.
  • When I was 18..I earned £5k before tax a year.

    I had to go to work on bus/train..so I was out the house at 7am and got home at 7pm. This cost £60 pm.

    My parents also wanted £125pm, which I paid, and I had to do all my own washing and ironing.

    On top of this, I had to pay poll tax which I remember being just under £400 per year.

    Dont think I have ever worked as hard for so little money!

    teaches value though....and that u cant have everything.

    My son is gonna get the same treatment, but hopefully I hope to save his money, and put it towards a deposit for him when he comes to leave home.
  • TribulationTribulation Forumite
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    crazyangel wrote: »
    Depends if how much they are earning,my son has started a training course which pays the education maintenance allowance of £30 per week and I don't take anything from him.But when hes in full time work then I will as there will be council tax etc I'll also loose my tax credits.


    Same situation as my daughter. I also don't take anything off her but at the same time, I now expect her to start paying her own way in life. A lot of her college friends have evening or weekend jobs, she's decided she doesn't want to have one. We feel it's in her own interest for us to give her a zero allowance. True she gets £30 a week, but now she gets zero pocket money she has to pay for everything she wants. Personally I really hope her friends who have jobs as well as college start doing things she cant afford, then maybe it will give her the kick she needs to go out and work.
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  • Waxy_BeanWaxy_Bean Forumite
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    I'm 24 and am living at home while I save for a deposit for a house. I pay my parents what they asked for (£200) and would be more than willing to contribute more if they would let me. As it is, I make more of a contribution in other ways - I do a lot of the cooking and cleaning, often pay for the supermarket shop and buy my parents (and younger brothers) gifts they wouldn't buy for themselves.

    My parents don't "need" the money not least becuase they've already paid off their mortgage, but it enables my mum to work part time and still to save for my brothers to go to university (they helped me through university financially too.
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  • keelykatkeelykat Forumite
    3.3K Posts
    Hi, he sounds like a lucky bloke to have so much money lol! I wish we had 400 quid left over to 'play with'....

    But anyway, i agree that some money should be given to the parents, all depending on their wages and current situation. The real world can be quite scary, and im still shocked now at all the bills/mortage payments/food shopping etc! So preparing for this is good.

    keely.
    Mommy to Elliot (5) and Lewis (born xmas eve 11!)
  • RASRAS Forumite
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    From the other side of the equation; when my housemates and I selected new people to share with, we almost always rejected the ones who had recently been living at home, because they did not have the first clue about budgetting or paying bills. Not infrequently we found that they were moving out of their first or second short term rental because of "personality clashes" that were essentially disputes over bills.

    No ta.

    Those who have not contributed also have problems when they get into relationships as well; still wanting to be jack the lad or miss conspicuous consumption.

    Do them a favour - make them pay a realistic amount. To put it bluntly, if they have more dsiposeable income than you, there is a problem somewhere.
    The person who has not made a mistake, has made nothing
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