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Average amount of savings for a 30 year old...

edited 30 November -1 at 1:00AM in How much have you saved?
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  • savingwannabesavingwannabe Forumite
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    If they have promised to pay towards your retirement a lot. Otherwise they are v expensive in terms of costs but the joy they give is priceless. Somethings I think cannot be measured on a balance sheet.
    Try to have a minimal spend year in 2021
    Saving change in money box.
  • FeefeefallooFeefeefalloo Forumite
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    I'm 30 and I have about 6k in savings husband has 7k (hes 26). Earn around £35k a year between us. We have mortgage and no kids. We saved up a £35k to buy our house so I think we're quite good savers.
  • Interesting thread , I am now 28 , I am single and recently bought my first home 12 months ago at age 27.

    Whilst living with parents and working full time I managed to save a total of £35,000. I have no student debt as uni education was payed for by my employer.

    I put down a £14,000 deposit on my home and have since payed off an additional £5,000 towards the capital. The house has also hiked in price by £5,000 giving me a total of £24,000 in home equity.

    Along with this I have recently trickled £5,000 cash savings into the stock market over several months for cost averaging and will be adding to this each month so that compounding works for me over the next 30 - 40 years until retirement.

    I also have £18,000 in cash savings , £8,000 of which I am slowly feeding into the stock market. I will be keeping back a 6 month emergency fund (£10,000)

    Not long started pension since the new regulations came into play so have around £2,500 in that.

    :beer:
  • savingwannabesavingwannabe Forumite
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    Gosh that's brilliant. You are v money savvy. Well done.:j
    Try to have a minimal spend year in 2021
    Saving change in money box.
  • I'm 26 and finished my apprenticeship in August so have been earning a proper wage of 36k a year since then.

    I have around 19k in savings but a 5k bank loan which I may pay off in the next couple of months. Pay 7% of my gross earnings into my pension and my company matches that. I'd like to think I'll be comfortable when I retire but who knows.

    My plan is to have 2 properties, one family home, the other the mortgage being payed for with the rent coming in.

    It really depends on your circumstances and I think as long as you're saving and not paying out more than you're earning you're doing alright. :beer:
  • I’m 32 years old and my net worth is roughly 130k, no pension or property and zero debt. Remember having 30k as a 21 year old though, so god knows what went wrong. I think saving is massively important in these uncertain times for our country, who knows where we’re heading? Good luck to all of you.
  • NorwooderNorwooder Forumite
    35 Posts
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    PEHsaver wrote: »
    I will be keeping back a 6 month emergency fund (£10,000)

    This feels a little on the high side based soley on what I've assumed your mortgage payments are likely to be.
  • EnzoAkEnzoAk Forumite
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    Old thread but anyway - I’m 25 years old, got married straight after I graduated 4 years ago, had enough savings at the time as I ran a small online shop and dealt with cars. Fast forward to 2018 - we now have £180,000+ in savings which we are planning to buy our first house with - I’m a very savvy saver but don’t get me wrong, we’ve still enjoyed lavish holidays and owned several supercars in the last 4 years.
  • savingwannabesavingwannabe Forumite
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    God I feel totally inadequate. lol. But it is fab to hear people are doing so well. I wish I knew how people earned so much. :D
    Try to have a minimal spend year in 2021
    Saving change in money box.
  • Found this thread really helpful to get a sense of what other people are doing so may as well add my story.

    Spent 20s in and out of overdrafts, not really aware of how much I was spending. Moved to London aged 26 and started earning a decent salary (£25-30k) and saved for a house. With help from family, bought a £365k house with 10% deposit with my partner at the time, aged 29.

    Split up with partner a year later, moved out of the house and he bought my half from me a year or so later. Spent a couple of years in post-break up-excess helped by a salary increase to about £58k which meant I didn’t spiral into dreadful debt. After a couple of years pulled myself together and aged 31 I bought my own flat for £325k, £220 of which was mortgage.

    That following year I needed to do work on the flat, so put all spare money towards that. A few months later I met my new partner. Had zero savings and have £7k on credit card left over from doing up flat, but both of us had jobs coming to and end and we impulsively decided to use our new relationship momentum and take a year off work together.

    Paid off £2k of credit card and transferred outstanding credit card to 0% card and in 4 months saved myself about £7k. I’m on a career break so will go back to my previous job and salary on return, and intend to try to save the same amount each month.

    Using those savings to travel now, and using my free time to come up with a much more responsible savings plan for when I get back.

    Am writing this from a hammock in Cambodia, and feeling like I’ve made the right decision to use the money and security I have to buy some freedom. Going to go back to the UK in 8 months or so, pay off that credit card ASAP and then start some serious saving, including some towards taking another year off work again in the not-too-distant future.

    So not too good, but not too bad, and I feel like I’ve lived.
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