Using parent and child spaces when heavily pregnant

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  • Mad-Frog
    Mad-Frog Posts: 936 Forumite
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    Nicki wrote: »
    You must be the size of a house :rotfl: :rotfl:

    The average newborn baby weighs around 7 to 8lbs or half a stone. Older babies weigh considerably more than that and a non walking toddler could weigh up to 20lbs or a stone and a half. Which is not taking into account the weight of the car seat which is more than the baby.

    No way on this earth though could I eat 7lbs in weight of food spread over 2 meals. That weight of food would probably last me most of the week!

    Eh??

    Where did I say I was overweight?

    you have answered my question though newborn is small and light, lighter than a backpack with a couple of lunches yes?

    And smaller too?

    So why should us tax payers on shifts have to walk a few more yards lugging lunch and dinner (not 7lb who said anything about weight??) a few more yards than a 5 month pregnant woman?

    I was talking about carrying rather than weight, I can still carry my very plump gorgeous nephew at 21 months a few paces to the shops!
  • Nicki
    Nicki Posts: 8,166 Forumite
    edited 15 June 2012 at 10:04PM
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    I am completely confused now! Mad frog you said that your bag with lunch and dinner in was definitely "no lighter" than a child. My point was that a normal person's lunch and dinner would be a fraction of the weight of a newborn baby, and an even smaller fraction of the weight of an older child.

    If you are saying, as you do in your last post, that your lunch and dinner combined is bigger in volume than a new born baby, then yes I am afraid that my opinion remains that you are eating absolutely vast quantities and therefore must be enormous :).

    http://www.someecards.com/usercards/viewcard/3886b438d782036b4b3b473b70526247
  • Mad-Frog
    Mad-Frog Posts: 936 Forumite
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    Nicki wrote: »
    I am completely confused now! Mad frog you said that your bag with lunch and dinner in was definitely "no lighter" than a child. My point was that a normal person's lunch and dinner would be a fraction of the weight of a newborn baby, and an even smaller fraction of the weight of an older child.

    If you are saying, as you do in your last post, that your lunch and dinner combined is bigger in volume than a new born baby, then yes I am afraid that my opinion remains that you are eating absolutely vast quantities and therefore must be enormous :).

    http://www.someecards.com/usercards/viewcard/3886b438d782036b4b3b473b70526247

    And the only thing in a working persons life is a 12 hour shift is lunch and diner etc etc?

    No laptop? Paper work, files etc etc

    Really don't you understand in this climate how work is done out of the office?

    Sorry if I didn't make myself clear but my bag is heavier a lot than a newborn in weight and size but I like many others park accordingly with or without a child with no difficulties
  • moneypuddle
    moneypuddle Posts: 936 Forumite
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    Mad Frog - are you talking about the car park in a supermarket? Why would you be taking your paperwork into the supermarket with you?
  • Mad-Frog
    Mad-Frog Posts: 936 Forumite
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    Mad Frog - are you talking about the car park in a supermarket? Why would you be taking your paperwork into the supermarket with you?
    On my way from/to work

    With my nieces or nephews or OH granddaughter?

    Why? Can't I shop when I want to?
  • Nicki
    Nicki Posts: 8,166 Forumite
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    You could of course lock the laptop and paperwork (and the 7lbs worth of packed lunch) in the boot whilst you shop to save you carrying them into the shop. An option not open to the parents of a newborn, or indeed toddler :D
  • moneypuddle
    moneypuddle Posts: 936 Forumite
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    Mad-Frog wrote: »
    On my way from/to work

    With my nieces or nephews or OH granddaughter?

    Why? Can't I shop when I want to?

    Of course. I just dont understand why you would possible carry office paperwork around a supermarket, when you could leave it in the car .... but each to their own
  • Mad-Frog
    Mad-Frog Posts: 936 Forumite
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    Of course. I just dont understand why you would possible carry office paperwork around a supermarket, when you could leave it in the car .... but each to their own

    Okay I don't mean to offend you but sometimes if I haven't had time to make something to eat I have to pop in to get something either on the way/ to from the office or on lunch

    I guess you haven't been to a city centre supermarket in quite some time
  • Person_one
    Person_one Posts: 28,884 Forumite
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    Nicki wrote: »
    You could of course lock the laptop and paperwork (and the 7lbs worth of packed lunch) in the boot whilst you shop to save you carrying them into the shop. An option not open to the parents of a newborn, or indeed toddler :D

    :eek:

    If my laptop (or car with laptop in it) gets stolen its not insured and I'm out £1300.

    (I'm not advocating 'person with laptop' parking spaces here though! :rotfl:)
  • moneypuddle
    moneypuddle Posts: 936 Forumite
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    Mad-Frog wrote: »
    Okay I don't mean to offend you but sometimes if I haven't had time to make something to eat I have to pop in to get something either on the way/ to from the office or on lunch

    I guess you haven't been to a city centre supermarket in quite some time


    Eh? Yeah weekly in fact but i leave PAPERWORK in the car. Anyway .....
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