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go back to days of yore

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  • 16011996
    16011996 Posts: 8,313 Forumite
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    your welcome math. :D
  • catznine
    catznine Posts: 3,192 Forumite
    I've been Money Tipped!
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    I don't think many of us would cope if rationing came back! I have no idea how our parents and grandparents did it, what with having to queue for ages, daily just to get that rationed food, and having to work long hours as well in some cases and then having to go home and cook from scratch (no takeaways or convenience food available)! I take my hat off to them. We are soooo very lucky now and yet we still complain when occasionally there are empty shelves at the supermarket.
    Our days are happier when we give people a bit of our heart rather than a piece of our mind.

    Jan grocery challenge £35.77/£120
  • 16011996
    16011996 Posts: 8,313 Forumite
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    I don't think many of us would cope if rationing came back!  I have no idea how our parents and grandparents did it,  what with having to queue for ages, daily just to get that rationed food, and having to work long hours as well in some cases and then having to go home and cook from scratch (no takeaways or convenience food available)!  I take my hat off to them.  We are soooo very lucky now and yet we still complain when occasionally there are empty shelves at the supermarket.


    i think we would cope, butonly because we would have to. i think the fact that there was no choice is what got our parents and grandparents through. but it would certainly be a shock to us.
  • vanoonoo
    vanoonoo Posts: 1,897 Forumite
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    not got any good books to tell about, but would suggest the following when cooking (taught my partner how and he quite good now) Take your time, don't rush and never cook anything on a high heat so you never find its burnt.

    Cheap meals we have are par boiled potatoes made in a casserole with value beans and value sausages (chopped lengthways in half), bunged in the oven for 25 mins. (My kids love this, beyond me why). Also for any stews or anything your making pearl barley or lentils are great to bulk it up and pearl barley is good for the memory allegedly.

    have you tried this one in the slo cooker 160? I notice you mentioned it in the thread about sausage casserole and remembered you'd said it before.
    Blah
  • Austin_Allegro_2
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    Apparently many poor people had BETTER diets in the war, because the rations were more than they had in peacetime.

    British people actually ate fairly well during the war. It looks meagre to us now, but compared to countries like Germany (where people literally starved to death) it was not too bad.

    I've got a great book called 'We'll Eat Again', wartime recipes by Marguerite Patten. She even tells you how to use real eggs instead of powdered egg, because you can't get that anymore!
  • Squidgy
    Squidgy Posts: 684 Forumite
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    I thought you could still get powdered egg? ???
    It's not WHAT you know, it's WHO you know
  • Squidgy
    Squidgy Posts: 684 Forumite
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    Yep. Here it is

    powdered egg

    And you could probably get it from outdoor shops as well
    It's not WHAT you know, it's WHO you know
  • culpepper
    culpepper Posts: 4,076 Forumite
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    The Woolton pie from the we'll eat again book was lovely.
    We did a week of rationing when the kids were doing WWII for their history.They enjoyed it and hubby managed to stick to it too(dont know if he cheated at work though:))
    We even built an airraid shelter in the garden out of corrugated iron.We didnt sleep in it though.
    There is a book in our library 'Rag time to Wartime' which has the menu for a coronation tea party laid out in detail.The kids got bread and Jam ,cake and tea .Cant imagine kids of today being happy with that.
  • Austin_Allegro_2
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    One frugal thing I remember fondly from days of yore were birthday parties. We always had traditional parties at home with games etc. I enjoyed them but always pestered my mum to buy novelty paper plates etc - she always refused saying these were a waste of money.

    I now here from people with kids that such parties are considered 'cheap' and children have to have a day out! :-/
  • culpepper
    culpepper Posts: 4,076 Forumite
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    My son and daughter used to have a birthday tea each year.They could invite 1 child home for tea and they played games,had tea with some kind of cake and played with the toys till the guests parent fetched them home.We never had more than 2 guests ,they loved it. My son went to a couple of parties when he was in the infants and the whole class was there.When we went to fetch him there was usually a stressed out mum. Things are very over the top nowadays,too much competition to have the best party etc.
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