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DLA fraud check

edited 30 November -1 at 1:00AM in Disability Money Matters
403 replies 29.2K views
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  • lynicedlyniced Forumite
    1.9K posts
    what is the nature of your disability, if you don't mind me asking?
    Me transmitte sursum, caledoni
  • I used my DLA funded MP3 Player today.

    And I now have my DLA funded Bubble Lamp on

    I also had my DLA funded cooked meal and pudding too

    Just thought I would rub it in for all those dedicated tax payers out there :P

    I'm living in my DLA funded house & it's lovely. ;)
    I'd rather regret the things I've done than regret the things I haven't done.
    Lucille Ball
  • I'm living in my DLA funded house & it's lovely. ;)

    Nice One :)

    Tomorrow I am going to the doctors on my DLA funded magic carpet
  • bertiebatbertiebat Forumite
    310 posts
    lyniced wrote: »
    what is the nature of your disability, if you don't mind me asking?

    I think karatedragon is afflicted by trollism.
    Just in case you were wondering (some have)..... I'm a woman!
  • SingleSueSingleSue Forumite
    11.4K posts
    Part of the Furniture 10,000 Posts Name Dropper Photogenic
    ✭✭✭✭✭
    krisskross wrote: »
    Well personally I have been otherwise engaged arranging for the GP to come to see my husband as he has a nasty chest infection and is really struggling to breathe. Already been on antibiotics and nebulised salbutamol for a couple of days. Husband has a depressed immune system and gets all manner of infections. Which in turn messes up his diabetic control and means much changing of insulin doses and extra monitoring.

    Discussion about hospital admission, doctor wants, husband doesn't. Agreed in the end that with a nurse (me) in 24/7 attendance then he can stay at home with daily GP visits. So perhaps I am worth the £70 a week AA just to keep him out of hospital.

    I am not a DLA hater, in fact I am very much in favour of people getting financial help to provide the care they say they need and on which basis the award is made. However if they still do not get the care and manage without it then why do they get the cash?

    You have my sympathy regarding diabetic control and illnesses, been there, done it and got the T shirt (ok, got to know all the different wards and corridors in the big hospital!).....not fun.

    Ex hubby had addisons disease and diabetes with a high rate of steroids which depressed his immune system, absolute nightmare when the boys were young and coming home from playgroup/school with tummy bugs, chicken pox etc.

    Now we have it with youngest (I really must get out of the habit of saying we, it really is just me), a slight cold that the other two just throw off usually turns into something very serious in youngest...so much so that a silly little cold 18 months ago, almost killed him.
    We made it! Two graduated, 1 currently at university, been hard work but it shows there is a possibility of a chance of normal (ish) life after a diagnosis (or two) of ASD. It's not been the easiest route but I am so glad I ignored everything and everyone and did my own therapies with them.
    Eldests' EDS diagnosis 4.5.10, mine 13.1.11 eekk!
  • SingleSueSingleSue Forumite
    11.4K posts
    Part of the Furniture 10,000 Posts Name Dropper Photogenic
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    sh1305 wrote: »
    What he wants doesn't matter. My dad had a very bad chest infection about 4-5 years ago. He had no choice but to go into hospital. Thankfully, he was just given medication (they thought it was COPD because of his smoking) and wasn't made to stay in hospital.

    And how do you know you're much more qualified nurse than him? The nurses have access to all his medical records - you don't. And I imagine they're more up to date with all the new drugs and other medical help he can be given.

    I'm afraid I agree with krisskross on this one, sometimes you have to take the lesser of two evils and especially so with a patient who has suppressed immunity. At least at home and with krisskross a retired nurse, he has the experience required to deal with him, the medication that is needed at this stage and the peace of mind it is only their two personal bugs..and krisskross will probably be at his side for the whole time (apart from obvious toilet breaks).

    In hospital, there are a myriad of different bugs going around, the nurses are not able to give the personal 24 hour, one to one care that krisskross can give and he would not have his usual comfortable surroundings available to be able to rest properly.

    I am sure krisskross knows her husband and his body much better than others and will know when it is time for him to go to hospital for much more intensive and intrusive treatment...if she is anything like me, she probably gets the same eeekkk panic feeling when she feels things are going beyond what she is comfortable with.
    We made it! Two graduated, 1 currently at university, been hard work but it shows there is a possibility of a chance of normal (ish) life after a diagnosis (or two) of ASD. It's not been the easiest route but I am so glad I ignored everything and everyone and did my own therapies with them.
    Eldests' EDS diagnosis 4.5.10, mine 13.1.11 eekk!
  • Just picking up on the bit about what people spend DLA money on.

    Not only is the amount given not sufficient to pay someone to give all the hours help needed, if the help were provided direct, there would be little or no flexibility.

    By using my money creatively, I can get more of the care I need. I use part of it to top up my LHA so that I can live a few doors away from a relative who cares for me (I have a severe mental illness) but who is not very mobile, so can't travel a long distance. I use part of it for taxis to friends' houses in a crisis. Better to have someone available 24/7 and accessible thanks to my DLA than to have someone there for a few hours a week who may not be there when I actually need them.

    There is another aspect of flexibility that is important. If someone else provides the care, it's likely to be on a regular, pre-booked basis, whereas needs can be variable. By having the cash, a disabled person can spend more some weeks than others, thus making best use of it, and cutting down on waste, thus reducing the need for funding from social services.

    DLA does spent on all sorts of things that it's not theoretically intended for, like extra heating and telephone calls to the Samaritans and health care professionals. They're not what the money is meant for, but they help to keep someone out of sheltered accommodation and living (at less cost to the public purse) in the community.

    My grandmother lived in an institution. They are expensive. A psychiatric placement can cost as much as £2000/week. By contrast, I live in the community and my care costs a fraction of that. Take away my DLA, and I'll still have the same needs, but you'll have to either abandon me or provide care in some other way, giving you the choice between being inhumane and spending more money.
  • sh1305 wrote: »
    To get the lower rate, you need at least one hour of care and you need it for at least 5 days a week. How many people do you know would be willing to work for £3.79 per hour? Many of us also find that we need more than an hour of help. Again, how many people do you know will be willing to work for a couple of pounds per hour?

    Don't you have boy scouts in your area? Has 'bob a job' died out completely? :D
  • I used my DLA funded MP3 Player today.

    And I now have my DLA funded Bubble Lamp on

    I also had my DLA funded cooked meal and pudding too

    Just thought I would rub it in for all those dedicated tax payers out there :P You know, the ones that slag DLA claimants while sucking the system of child benefit.
    That was a really unsuccessful fishing trip.
    *SIGH*
    :D
  • WhiteHorseWhiteHorse Forumite
    2.5K posts
    Tomorrow I am going to the doctors on my DLA funded magic carpet
    Would that be the one which costs the NHS ten times as much as it costs an ordinary person when bought over the counter?
    "Never underestimate the mindless force of a government bureaucracy
    seeking to expand its power, dominion and budget"
    Jay Stanley, American Civil Liberties Union.
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