Great 'Big Freeze Tips' Hunt

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  • As a lifelong sufferer of Reynaud's Syndrome I have learned how to keep warm. Trouble is, living where winters have been mild for the past few years I've forgotten to practice all that knowledge until I made the mistake of walking out wearing leather gloves. 20 mins later I thought my hands would fall off, the pain was excrutiating. I knew better than wear wellies, these too are no good for people with this condition. So what is?

    1. Don't go out without first eating and drinking something warming. Preferably not alcohol as it lowers the body temperature.

    2. Dress up in layers, with wind and waterproof one on top. Wear a hat. Wear walking socks with jeans/trousers tucked into ankle warmers, topped with waterproof trousers and proper walking boots. If the body is warm the extremities are less likely to freeze. Wear FLEECE gloves, preferably inside fleece mittens. Then go out and walk!

    3. Always use a stick or better, walking poles, regardless of your age! They can stop you slipping on the ice and help your progress through snow. Take small steps going downhill or where it is slippery. Walking uphill is easier and very warming!

    4. When you get back home you should feel warmer. Shed the outdoor clothing and have a Hot drink. Then keep moderately active indoors.

    5. Catch up on that hand washing of your delicate clothes, the warm water is soothing. Take a bath.

    6. In addition to keeping the store cupboard stocked with tinned food etc. the candles and camping stove on hand for emergencies, remember to always keep extra water stored in jugs or saucepans. Three times this month we've got up in the morning to find that the water company's pump that supplies our water has stopped working.

    7. Read everyone else tips, some of them are really useful. And don't worry about how you look. Just keep active and keep warm!
  • BigMummaF
    BigMummaF Posts: 4,281 Forumite
    On one of yesterday's Country-side programmes, the forecast was for more snow on Weds the whole length of the UK :o so keep those tips a-cummin....
    Full time Carer for Mum; harassed mother of three;
    loving & loved by two 4-legged babies.

  • emh_2
    emh_2 Posts: 137 Forumite
    First Post First Anniversary Combo Breaker
    Glamazon wrote: »
    ETA - after cooking, leave the oven door open and let all the heat out. Warms my cold kitchen up a treat!

    Do this especially if its a fan oven, ours uses electricity to COOL the oven down when it is turned off!, but opening the door does it faster, saving money and heating the kitchen up. Took me ages to realise the oven was using electricity after it was turned off.
  • carry a bag of CAT LITTER in your boot, it means you have your own supply of GRIT if you get stuck. Tip given to me by a Canadian.
  • forgot to add to above , it made a bit of a mess of my drive when it thawed, but the rain has washed it away now
  • jaydax wrote: »
    If there's even the slightest possibility that you may get stranded in a snow bound car take a couple of broad based candles with you. Nightlights work well. The small amount of heat from them makes all the difference and the flame cheers you up and lets rescuers know you are there.

    [threadbanner]box[/threadbanner]
    Good idea for heat BUT candles will use up the oxygen in the vehicle so you will need to either have a window open a crack or open it up every so often
  • i bought some swedish ice spikes from ebay £8 that fit on bottom of your boots.. they really make a difference.. the name is "swedish no slip ice spikes".. they keep selling out cos are so popular so if they are not there, they will soon reappear.. keep trying.. postage is free..
  • geojay
    geojay Posts: 17 Forumite
    First Anniversary Combo Breaker
    jaydax wrote: »
    If there's even the slightest possibility that you may get stranded in a snow bound car take a couple of broad based candles with you. Nightlights work well. The small amount of heat from them makes all the difference and the flame cheers you up and lets rescuers know you are there. I learnt this in Canada.

    [threadbanner]box[/threadbanner]

    I'm not quite sure what a nightlight is but if they're like tea lights with the metal case I'd be very cautious. Tea-lights are very dangerous if not used in a candle holder of some sort. Unlike a candle, the wax in a tea-light is liquid when the tea-light is burning which means the metal case gets incredibly hot. This could conceivably catch fire to a dashboard if placed directly on it. A car fire is a very nasty thing, cars are full of plastics and rubbers which give off toxic fumes when burnt not to mention burn very quickly!
  • When you park your car, leave it in gear with the handbrake off. Standard pratice when I was in Moscow. Friend of mine forgot, the handbrake froze on and she had to wait till the Spring thaw before she could drive the car.
  • Kandipandi wrote: »
    Cheap cat litter works a bit like rock salt for gritting your drive/lane. (obviously unused!!)

    ah! that explains why the supermarket shelves were empty and my poor cat had to do with ripped up copies of the Telegraph!
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