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Great ‘Take care of your wardrobe’ Hunt

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  • I bought some clear plastic compartment boxes from hardware shops (usually for screws/nails, etc) and lined the bottom with funky foam (from art/craft shops - apprx 50p) then put all my costume jewellery in the compartments, (which can be adjusted in size with the dividers).

    Means my necklaces dont get tangled with rings, necklaces, earrings, hair clips, etc and you can quickly & easily see whats in each box :-)
  • ladykath
    ladykath Posts: 58 Forumite
    I heard a tip a while ago on TV to use tumble dryer sheets in a suitcase when going on holiday to make it smell nice. Since then I have used these to freshen lots of things. I pop one in the wardrobe from time to time and cut one in half and pop it behind the radiator to make a lovely room freshener.
  • jerez
    jerez Posts: 16 Forumite
    I was interested to see all the posts recommending repair and renovation to clothes. I am sorry that sewing is no longer taught as standard in schools but it's never too late. Learn to sew. It really isn't that difficult. A course of lessons in the basics will start you off and the rest is really just patience, common sense and attention to detail. There are hundreds of books on every imaginable aspect of dressmaking, alterations and repairs as well as sewing for your home. Most pattern makers include clear instructions - if you can put flat pack furniture together you can follow these. You will save hundreds, maybe thousands of pounds.

    I usually have a new winter coat (or two) every year and have just started this year's. Gorgeous red melton cloth in 100% wool. The whole lot, including the pattern has cost about £60. It will be unique and very stylish. I do have a bit of a coat obsession!

    Most local authorities will have some kind of sewing classes on offer. If yours doesn't start a campaign and ask for it. If enough people want one they may set one up. Or contact your local community centre. Same deal for something that is in demand.
  • jerez wrote: »
    I was interested to see all the posts recommending repair and renovation to clothes. I am sorry that sewing is no longer taught as standard in schools but it's never too late. Learn to sew. It really isn't that difficult. A course of lessons in the basics will start you off and the rest is really just patience, common sense and attention to detail. There are hundreds of books on every imaginable aspect of dressmaking, alterations and repairs as well as sewing for your home. Most pattern makers include clear instructions - if you can put flat pack furniture together you can follow these. You will save hundreds, maybe thousands of pounds.

    I usually have a new winter coat (or two) every year and have just started this year's. Gorgeous red melton cloth in 100% wool. The whole lot, including the pattern has cost about £60. It will be unique and very stylish. I do have a bit of a coat obsession!

    Most local authorities will have some kind of sewing classes on offer. If yours doesn't start a campaign and ask for it. If enough people want one they may set one up. Or contact your local community centre. Same deal for something that is in demand.

    It looks like we aren't the only ones who are "make-do-and-mending".....the BBC have an article running about the upsurge in sewing-your-own.

    I like the idea of this lady "make-do-and-mending" her way around Britain, I think I'll try to stay awake to listen to the prog.
  • jtz
    jtz Posts: 1,423 Forumite
    First Anniversary Combo Breaker
    ItchieFeet wrote: »
    I bought some clear plastic compartment boxes from hardware shops (usually for screws/nails, etc) and lined the bottom with funky foam (from art/craft shops - apprx 50p) then put all my costume jewellery in the compartments, (which can be adjusted in size with the dividers).

    Means my necklaces dont get tangled with rings, necklaces, earrings, hair clips, etc and you can quickly & easily see whats in each box :-)
    Love this idea!!! will definitely do this as every time I want to wear a new piece of jewellry from my cupboard I have to send ages untangling it from something! Also you can get these kind of boxes from most pound shops!:T:j
  • Ellidee
    Ellidee Posts: 6,216 Forumite
    First Post Combo Breaker First Anniversary
    I read a good tip on another thread on here - use ice cube trays for earrings.
    Nothing is so fatiguing as the eternal hanging on of an uncompleted task. William James
  • elisamoose
    elisamoose Posts: 1,123 Forumite
    First Post Combo Breaker First Anniversary
    Local authorities seem to offer lots of course but in my area the take up is so low that they end up being cancelled. I paid for soft furnishings and knitting and both were cancelled. I would be interested to know just how many of the advertised course actually take place !
  • Floss
    Floss Posts: 8,239 Forumite
    Name Dropper First Post First Anniversary Photogenic
    jerez wrote: »
    Most local authorities will have some kind of sewing classes on offer. If yours doesn't start a campaign and ask for it. If enough people want one they may set one up. Or contact your local community centre. Same deal for something that is in demand.
    elisamoose wrote: »
    Local authorities seem to offer lots of course but in my area the take up is so low that they end up being cancelled. I paid for soft furnishings and knitting and both were cancelled. I would be interested to know just how many of the advertised course actually take place !

    TBH, with their finances being pushed to limits, most local authorities cannot afford to run courses that will not pay their way, espcially with the recent financial crisis of the Learning Skills Council who would have funded a lot of the courses in past years.

    I would suggest looking for a Stitch & B*tch group for knitting - they should happily accept beginners or more experienced knitters.
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  • rosieben
    rosieben Posts: 5,010 Forumite
    Combo Breaker First Post
    edited 13 September 2023 at 8:11PM
    It looks like we aren't the only ones who are "make-do-and-mending".....the BBC have an article running about the upsurge in sewing-your-own. ...

    interesting article WD, thanks for the link ;) and I quote -

    "... Now we're much more interested in how things are made, valuing quality over quantity.

    This is happening in many areas, from sewing to growing your own veg or making food from scratch. I also think women are empowered enough now to enjoy sewing without any stereotypical associations or Victorian attitudes."

    Absolutely!! :T :T :T
    ... don't throw the string away. You always need string! :D

    C.R.A.P.R.O.L.L.Z Head Sharpener
  • shetitasatic
    shetitasatic Posts: 209 Forumite
    edited 2 October 2009 at 3:11PM
    I also dye jeans, cottons and linens (esp towels) but be aware that a '100%' cotton or linen garment is often stitched with polyester thread. I have some 'interesting 'clothes which I have dyed , which have contrasting white stitching!

    When we first met about 20 yrs ago, my DH bought me a coat, very classic, long, black. I still wear it for funerals etc. ( when I was working it was my 'Court' coat!) It is now looking a bit threadbare on the lapels so I have covered this up with a black permanent marker pen does the trick and looks fine!

    I also find wearing a heavyweight satin -type waist slip/petticoat under summer skirts and dresses makes them fit and hang much better , especially bias cut ones- M&S and BHS do them in black and white.

    I am always scouring charity shops - especially in 'good 'areas. If you are handy with a sewing machine, don't just look in your size. I have a lovely Boden skirt which I cut down from an 18 to a 14, and several Monsoon skirts which I have shortened (I'm sure they make theirs for giants!)
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