Worms and Wormeries (Merged Discussion Thread)

edited 30 November -1 at 1:00AM in Greenfingered MoneySaving
137 replies 16.5K views
lynzpowerlynzpower Forumite
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edited 30 November -1 at 1:00AM in Greenfingered MoneySaving
Hi all

Wondering what exactly is the difference between the 2.

the £6 compost bin looks perfect for me price wise but is it OK ?

I want to be able to put in
All food waste, pizza ends, old teabags, bones the lot I didnt think you could with standard composts, you could only put veg waste in - is that right?

Cheers
:beer: Well aint funny how its the little things in life that mean the most? Not where you live, the car you drive or the price tag on your clothes.
Theres no dollar sign on piece of mind
This Ive come to know...
So if you agree have a drink with me, raise your glasses for a toast :beer:
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Replies

  • lynzpowerlynzpower Forumite
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    come on!! Someone must know? :confused:
    :beer: Well aint funny how its the little things in life that mean the most? Not where you live, the car you drive or the price tag on your clothes.
    Theres no dollar sign on piece of mind
    This Ive come to know...
    So if you agree have a drink with me, raise your glasses for a toast :beer:
  • starlite_2starlite_2 Forumite
    2.4K Posts
    A wormery is a sealed unit to which you add worms to compost waste. Wormeries are designed to take soft kitchen waste only and are therefore ideal for people living in flats or those who have little or no garden waste.


    Wormeries tend to look similar to bins used in the kitchen, except that they are supplied with a tightly fitting lid. Inside, a perforated platform placed six inches or so from the base, allows liquid to drain through to prevent the worms from drowning.

    A tap located on the side allows this section to be emptied. Bedding material such as newspaper is added for the worms to live in and breed. Kitchen waste is then added on top of this.

    The worms used are usually Brandlings or Tiger worms. Earthworms would not survive in this environment since they need to burrow back into the earth. Tigerworms are happy to live within their food source and so are well suited to wormeries.

    The worms digest the material and the result is a rich, fine compost which is more even than the compost from a compost bin.

    Wormeries are generally kept indoors and there is no need to introduce air since the worms create their own air channels as they move through the material. Wormeries can, however, encounter problems if not maintained properly.

    The worms within a wormery are totally dependent on you for their well-being. Putting in too much waste could lead it to turn rotten if the worms cannot keep up with the volume of material being added. This, in turn, can produce unpleasant smells and a highly acidic environment in which the worms will die or even try to escape.

    These problems will be more obvious as wormeries are generally kept indoors, at least during the winter months, to protect them from freezing temperatures. If you forget to drain off the liquid on a regular basis the worms can drown but adding lots of dry material can dehydrate them.

    It is for these reasons that it is recommended for you to use a normal compost bin rather than a wormery. If you are thinking of using a wormery it would be best to do as much research as possible beforehand.
    Membre Of Teh Misspleing Culb
  • Patience Lynzpower,

    it might take a few days for people to notice the new forum. I googled your question and got the comments below. This forum thrives on personal experiences and I hope someone can add theirs. Personally I have a compost bin in the garden I have been meaning to site for over a year. My bad.

    Cheers
    Simon

    A wormery is a sealed unit to which you add worms to compost waste. Wormeries are designed to take soft kitchen waste only and are therefore ideal for people living in flats or those who have little or no garden waste.

    Wormeries tend to look similar to bins used in the kitchen, except that they are supplied with a tightly fitting lid. Inside, a perforated platform placed six inches or so from the base, allows liquid to drain through to prevent the worms from drowning.

    A tap located on the side allows this section to be emptied. Bedding material such as newspaper is added for the worms to live in and breed. Kitchen waste is then added on top of this.

    The worms used are usually Brandlings or Tiger worms. Earthworms would not survive in this environment since they need to burrow back into the earth. Tigerworms are happy to live within their food source and so are well suited to wormeries.

    The worms digest the material and the result is a rich, fine compost which is more even than the compost from a compost bin.

    Wormeries are generally kept indoors and there is no need to introduce air since the worms create their own air channels as they move through the material. Wormeries can, however, encounter problems if not maintained properly.

    The worms within a wormery are totally dependent on you for their well-being. Putting in too much waste could lead it to turn rotten if the worms cannot keep up with the volume of material being added. This, in turn, can produce unpleasant smells and a highly acidic environment in which the worms will die or even try to escape.

    These problems will be more obvious as wormeries are generally kept indoors, at least during the winter months, to protect them from freezing temperatures. If you forget to drain off the liquid on a regular basis the worms can drown but adding lots of dry material can dehydrate them.

    It is for these reasons that it is recommended for you to use a normal compost bin rather than a wormery. If you are thinking of using a wormery it would be best to do as much research as possible beforehand.
  • jordylassjordylass Forumite
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    I have both and I much prefer my wormery, but it's not big enough to keep up with the amount of waste my family produces...for 1/2 people they would be ideal.
    The compost bin takes garden waste which you can't put into the wormey.
    You can't put bones into either they take too long to decompose.

    Mine is not as technical as the one descirbed above, i made it from plastic B&Q boxes, and it has a piece of wood as a lid, it is also kept outdoors, sheltered from sun and insulated with bin liners in winter.
    There is nothing either good or bad but thinking makes it so.
  • The womery is fab for the 2 of us and I get at least 2 trays of fine compost to mix with other peat free compost for liven up my pots each summer. You also get worm juice all year round which you can mix with 10 parts water - beats other feeds you can get and totally organic. You can put in any fruit/veg/fibre (cardboard, pet hair, egg chells, tea bags) and flowers/leaves but if you add too much onion or citrus fruit you will need to counterbalance it by adding a handful of lime (can be bought in large bags from wigglywigglers.com). I keep mine outside in a sheltered position and have a raincap on the top to stop too much rain getting in and drowning the poor things. I just adore my worms!!!:heartsmil
    The composter is great too - all the garden cuttings etc... go in here (and the excess citrus and onions, turn it over a few times a month and you get great composter for your borders. I also chuck in the worms I find while digging the garden - they help break it down alot quicker.:D
    The greencone - you can put bones in this one and it breaks them down and the juice runs directly into the soil - great soil improver. Not everyone is a fan of this but just make sure you follow the intructions and bury it to the correct depth and all should be fine!!!
    I also have a shreader - just shread all those woody prunings and cuttings that take an age to compost and you get mulch to help stop the weeds.

    Let me out in to the garden right now!!!:dance:
  • Linda32Linda32 Forumite
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    I don't have a wormery but we do have a compost bin on the allotment.

    With a compost bin its all about creating different layers, not to much of one thing or the other.

    So we shread our paper and put a layer of that in.
    Then its kitchen waste. You can use all raw veggies and peelings, salads, egg shells, cut flowers, dead headed plants.

    Nothing thats been cooked, no weeds.

    Hope this helps
  • QueenieQueenie Forumite
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    Linda32 wrote:
    ..
    With a compost bin its all about creating different layers, not to much of one thing or the other.

    Is it :eek:

    Layers you say?

    Crikey, I just put in all the bits as and when - still get great compost. Kitchen peelings; grass cuttings; shredded paper, bits of cardboard, contents from hoover, etc., no particular order. Now I have a hen, all the droppings will be put in the composter too.

    Can't speak for wormeries, never had one and I only have a small garden but the compost bin I purchased on offer from the council a few years ago has really served us well.

    No bones go into ours - they take a while to decompose plus they would attract vermin.
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  • lynzpowerlynzpower Forumite
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    thank you thank you all of you

    There are 2 of us, and a wormery would be fine for us. We only have a small garden ( with a tiny lawn) so a traditional compost heap wont really work

    Do you think its possible to buy one of these standard plastic compost bins ( say big enough for 3 or 4 people) and then buy some of these worms and put them in?
    :beer: Well aint funny how its the little things in life that mean the most? Not where you live, the car you drive or the price tag on your clothes.
    Theres no dollar sign on piece of mind
    This Ive come to know...
    So if you agree have a drink with me, raise your glasses for a toast :beer:
  • wendyjbwendyjb Forumite
    66 Posts
    I too have a wormery and find it ideal to get rid off the waste we produce and in turn get back lovely compost and liquid fertiliser.
    It is possible to buy the worms seperate, i've just ordered another 500g of worms, so if you can make it yourself to save money then go ahead.
    I also keep mine outside, and have had no problems. I choose not to put in any citrus peel or onions, and its never tested as being too acidic as a result.

    I thought a standard compost bin didn't have bottoms. Won't all the worms escape?
    £2 Money Savers Club = £18 :T
    Car loan 1 = Paid off :dance:
    Car loan 2 = £2400 :(
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  • MadoMado Forumite
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    I think my compost bin has turned into a wormery....Lots of horrible little flies in it too.
    I know it's too wet (I keep adding paper).
    Anyone's got any suggestions ????
    I lost my job as a cricket commentator for saying “I don’t want to bore you with the details”.Milton Jones
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