Water bills cost cutting article

edited 30 November -1 at 1:00AM in Water Bills
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  • CardewCardew Forumite
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    I understand that the default position, that the companies are allowed to adopt, is you pay for surface water drainage into sewers and have to inform/prove the company if it goes into a soakaway. They may or may not check this out.

    For most companies the charge depends on the type of dwelling e.g. for Severn Trent this year it is £24/£48/£72 for flat or terrace/Semi-d/Detached.

    If unmetered you can chose to have it assessed on the Rateable Value. However as the cost is between 40pence and 54 pence per £1RV you would be very unlikely to choose this method of asssessment.

    As you say in your last point it doesn't affect the company if they don't raise the charge. They are allowed to raise a pre-determined revenue and it will achieve this by raising other charges.
  • qman69qman69 Forumite
    17 Posts
    Hung up my suit!
    I was thinking of getting a water meter fitted but my OH who is a conveyancing secretary tells me that when it comes to selling the property, having a water meter installed can affect the sale because some people don't like having a water meter.

    Any body know anything about this? It;s not that I doubt my OH but I feel that things may have changed recently and she may not be up to date.

    I suppose I could go round the local Estate Agents and ask them, but I'm a bit lazy).
    :rotfl: :rotfl:

    How things can change overnight -

    February 06 - With self control I will be debt free in three years (apart from my mortgage!)
    Total - £25,000 :eek: Estimated Debt-Free date - January 2009 :j :rotfl:

    July 06 - Made redundant and given early retirement
    Total - £0 and replaced the car.

    Now looking for a job to top-up the pension. :T
  • calleywcalleyw Forumite
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    qman69 wrote:
    I was thinking of getting a water meter fitted but my OH who is a conveyancing secretary tells me that when it comes to selling the property, having a water meter installed can affect the sale because some people don't like having a water meter.

    Any body know anything about this? It;s not that I doubt my OH but I feel that things may have changed recently and she may not be up to date.

    I suppose I could go round the local Estate Agents and ask them, but I'm a bit lazy).

    I suppose it depends. For us it means we have saved money as there are only two of us and we bought a 3 bedroom house. Being on a meter is cheaper than the rateable value of the one bedroom flat we owned. We moved out last year just as the new bills where coming in and they wanted £210 a year. We spend about £180 a year on water now.

    I have no idea what the rateable value would be. But know it would be more than a £180.

    Also in some parts of the country you like kent I believe you have no choice you have to have a meter.

    Don't think that will stop people buying in kent.

    Like most things it is swings and roundabouts.


    Yours


    Calley
    Hope for everything and expect nothing!!!

    Good enough is almost always good enough -Prof Barry Schwartz

    If it scares you, it might be a good thing to try -Seth Godin
  • qman69qman69 Forumite
    17 Posts
    Hung up my suit!
    Cheers - someting to bear in mind while I mull it over
    :rotfl: :rotfl:

    How things can change overnight -

    February 06 - With self control I will be debt free in three years (apart from my mortgage!)
    Total - £25,000 :eek: Estimated Debt-Free date - January 2009 :j :rotfl:

    July 06 - Made redundant and given early retirement
    Total - £0 and replaced the car.

    Now looking for a job to top-up the pension. :T
  • CardewCardew Forumite
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    The old Rateable value system was quite strange.

    Huge unmodernised old houses around here could have a very low Rateable Value,(RV) - much lower than a modest, but modern, 2 bedroomed semi.

    That old house could now be completely modernised and be worth many times that of the semi(and be in the top Council Tax band) yet its RV for water charge purposes could remain lower than the semi. The RV being frozen at 1989 values.

    So retaining an unmetered tariff might be an attraction for a potential buyer of the large house; especially if they were likely to use a lot of water.

    However the majority of people are better off with a meter and in some areas meters are compulsory when ownership changes - there was athread on this a little while ago.
  • Scottish Hydro
    Just ran the comparion via comparison link £203 unmetered £605 with a meter.
    Thank God it rains in Scotland
  • You don't only get a rebate if your rainwater goes into a soakaway. I live in a new house and got a rebate because my rainwater goes into a separate drain from the sewer system. The plan of your property should show your drainage system and this is what you need to send to the water company when you apply.
  • CardewCardew Forumite
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    robertsw15 wrote:
    You don't only get a rebate if your rainwater goes into a soakaway. I live in a new house and got a rebate because my rainwater goes into a separate drain from the sewer system. The plan of your property should show your drainage system and this is what you need to send to the water company when you apply.

    Where does that 'separate drain' lead to, if not a soakaway?

    Most houses have a separate drain system that leads to a soakaway either on their land or nearby. Unless there are exceptional circumstances I believe all new builds must use a soakaway.
  • dejongjdejongj Forumite
    141 Posts
    I got nearly a shock when we moved into our house, the rateable value was about £640 for just the two of us! Immediately got a meter installed and now we only pay about £280....Massive saving....
  • MJBMJB Forumite
    21 Posts
    Hello- I've just been told by Thames Water that they dont do an 'assessed charge bill' as mentioned in the original article.
    Does anyone know if this is correct?
    All they offer is a 'minimum fixed charge bill' of £245 which I know must be way over what my usage is- I have a 2 bed flat with 2 people, no dishwasher, almost never have baths, only showers etc.
    They say i cant get a meter because its a block of flats with common supply.

    i hope this one hasnt been covered previously, but can anyone give any suggestions?

    Thanks
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