New Post Advanced Search

Coronavirus: The latest from MSE


The MSE team is working extremely hard to keep the info we have about your travel rights, cancellation rights, sick pay (and more) up to date.
The official MSE guides: UPDATED MSE Coronavirus Guides

NEWSFLASH


New, free ‘Academoney’ course from MSE and the Open University launches
All the key areas of personal finance are covered, so that you can master your money decisions


Washing Line Or Rotary?

edited 30 November -1 at 1:00AM in Old Style MoneySaving
138 replies 81.4K views
Penny-Pincher!!Penny-Pincher!! Forumite
8.3K posts
✭✭✭✭
edited 30 November -1 at 1:00AM in Old Style MoneySaving
Hey

My washing line needs replacing as it has rust marks on it and I can only use part of it etc. I have seen a normal retractable line one in Argos for £6.99 or a double one for a tenner, but was wondering whether you guys think a rotary is just as good :confused: I see there alot more expensive :eek:

I dont have a big back garden and we are saving for a conservatory which should be done around next Feb/March. This is going to make garden space more limited and think maybe a rotary will be better suited, also it has a cover and will look quite neat.

How does a rotary line compare to a standard line? Can I get 2 washloads on a rotary line?

I sound really dense..lol. :p Hope someone can advise.

Penny-Pincher!!
xxx
To repeat what others have said, requires education, to challenge it,
requires brains!
FEB GC/DIESEL £200/4 WEEKS
«13456714

Replies

  • squeakysqueaky Forumite
    14.1K posts
    I'm a Volunteer Board Guide
    ✭✭✭✭✭
    It sounds like in your situation a rotary one would be a good idea - and yes, I get two loads on mine.
    Hi, I'm a Board Guide on the Old Style and the Consumer Rights boards which means I'm a volunteer to help the boards run smoothly and can move and merge posts there. Board guides are not moderators and don't read every post. If you spot an inappropriate or illegal post then please report it to [email protected]. It is not part of my role to deal with reportable posts. Any views are mine and are not the official line of MoneySavingExpert.
    Never ascribe to malice that which is adequately explained by incompetence.
    DTFAC: Y.T.D = £5.20 Apr £0.50
  • se999se999 Forumite
    2.4K posts
    When we've had small gardens we've had rotaries, but I'm never that keen, if you fully load the stuff in the middle takes longer to dry.

    What we did at one place was have hooks on the walls, and had a normal line we put up and took down, that way it was out of the way when we wanted the garden to look pretty. Because it was a small area we zigzagged it to get the drying area we needed.

    I know you can get covers for rotaries, but they don't look that pretty. Also theoretically you can lift them out and put back, but I've always found something gets in the hole or it sticks and you can't move it.

    Where we're renting there are lines on hooks again, and it made me remember how good this system is.

    Hope this helps.
  • squeakysqueaky Forumite
    14.1K posts
    I'm a Volunteer Board Guide
    ✭✭✭✭✭
    I learned to put light, small, and thin things in the middle and heavier stuff to the outside :)
    Hi, I'm a Board Guide on the Old Style and the Consumer Rights boards which means I'm a volunteer to help the boards run smoothly and can move and merge posts there. Board guides are not moderators and don't read every post. If you spot an inappropriate or illegal post then please report it to [email protected]. It is not part of my role to deal with reportable posts. Any views are mine and are not the official line of MoneySavingExpert.
    Never ascribe to malice that which is adequately explained by incompetence.
    DTFAC: Y.T.D = £5.20 Apr £0.50
  • 1601199616011996 Forumite
    8.3K posts
    i prefer lines too. i find rotary ones don't dry as fast, or as well, especially in the middle. ti have a pull out one i zig zag accross a small sapce, it works really well, the hooks hadly show up, and its neat and tidily away when i've finished.
  • Hi
    I always put small things in the middle, like pants and socks etc and the kids things,
    then bigger and thicker clothes and sheets, towels etc round the outside. Maybe Ive got a big rotary drier but mine holds 4 loads and Ive never had a problem with it.
    I had it about a year after I got married so its now 12 years old and still going strong, looks as good as new. I dont leave it up though, after Ive finished with it I fold it down and out the cover on it. OH removes it to mow the lawn and then pops it back in. The only problem Ive had is with the covers, I seem to have to replace them quite often as they rip at the top, usually mend them a few times first with staples etc before finally giving in. I think it may be squirrels though, we have loads of them around here, I have seen one climb up the airer under the cover once.
  • catkinscatkins Forumite
    5.7K posts
    I've been Money Tipped!
    I personally hate rotary dryers. Maybe it's me but I always found things took longer to dry. Also if it is a fairly breezy day washing on a normal line blows a lot more which I prefer.

    I have a rotary for about 3 years but am now back to a line and much prefer it
    The world is over 4 billion years old and yet you somehow managed to exist at the same time as David Bowie
  • rchddap1rchddap1 Forumite
    5.9K posts
    We have a small garden and decided to go with a rotary. So far haven't had a single problem with it. Our rotary is placed in the middle of the garden so that it catches more of the wind. It does a good job for us.
    Baby Year 1: Oh dear...on the move

    Lily contracted Strep B Meningitis Dec 2006 :eek: Now seemingly a normal little monster. :beer:
    Love to my two angels that I will never forget.
  • gremlingremlin Forumite
    1.2K posts
    Hi


    Have you considered the retractable washing line. Like THIS one.

    When I needed a new line I looked at all of the options as well and decided that this was my best bet. They are about 15m long when you open them out so theres plenty of drying space and because it rolls back into the storage holder when your not using it I find its safer when my kids play in the garden and its out of view too. You can get them for about £5 in any hardware/diy or ive seen them in Asda too.
    "Beauty is in the eye of the beholder and it may be necessary from time to time to give a stupid or misinformed beholder a black eye" - Miss Piggy
  • tootles_2tootles_2 Forumite
    1.1K posts
    I have had several rotary driers, I do prefer a line but where space is at a premuim you really do not have an alternative, I can get 3 washer loads on mine and I do not peg stuff on every line but leave a line space between, this seems to help things to dry quicker, I put light smallish things in the middle and heavier stuff to the outside, if I hang a duvey cover on the line I pin it by the corners and drape it over the next bit of line and then pin up the outisde corners on the three longest lines towards the outside...... this means that it does not whip too far when the wind blows and prevents it from fouling anything that might be a tad too close.



    Living in the sunny? Midlands, where the pork pies come from:

    saving for a trip to Florida and NYC Spring 2008

    Total so far £14.00!!
  • Have a rotary line here too.....always have had,cant seem to stand or get on well with a normal line.
    mine also holds 4 loads so must be big.....wasnt that dear though...got it for £15 in lidls last year....must admit was worried about the quality when we got it but its great.
Sign In or Register to comment.

Quick links

Essential Money | Who & Where are you? | Work & Benefits | Household and travel | Shopping & Freebies | About MSE | The MoneySavers Arms | Covid-19 & Coronavirus Support