Green, ethical, energy issues in the news

edited 12 July 2021 at 11:38AM in Green & Ethical MoneySaving
6.9K replies 445.6K views
1635636638640641693

Replies

  • Martyn1981Martyn1981 Forumite
    13.1K Posts
    Part of the Furniture 10,000 Posts Name Dropper Photogenic
    Forumite
    That's quite some storage facility, the scale of which we can perhaps only dream of here in the UK. Guess the terrain here doesn't lend itself to structures of such scale and if it did then the environmental impact would likely bring it into serious question.
    China is often painted as the bad guy when it comes to climate change but they do now appear to have a strong focus on renewables.

    State Grid of China switches on world’s largest pumped-hydro station

    Located in China’s Hebei province, the 3.6GW facility consists of 12 reversible pump generating sets with a capacity of 300MW each and has a storage capacity of 6.612 billion kWh.

    The State Grid Corporation of China, which is China’s largest state-owned grid operator and power utility, has commissioned, last week, the 3.6GW Fengning Pumped Storage Power Station, a pumped-storage hydroelectric power station located in Hebei province.

    The construction of the $1.87 billion project, which was implemented in two 1.8GW phases, was started by engineering company China Gezhouba Group Company Limited in 2014.




    Ello mate. Brill scheme, not knocking it, but of course I have to jump to the defence of the Welsh, by pointing out that Dinorwig is an impressive 50% of the size of this Chinese scheme.

    It has half the turbines (also 300MW each) so a potential generation of 1.8GW, and if cycled once per day, also has half the energy capacity at ~3.3TWh pa.

    Insert joke about the Chinese copying what others have done?   ;)
    Mart. Cardiff. 5.58 kWp PV systems (3.58 ESE & 2.0 WNW)

    For general PV advice please see the PV FAQ thread on the Green & Ethical Board.
  • Martyn1981Martyn1981 Forumite
    13.1K Posts
    Part of the Furniture 10,000 Posts Name Dropper Photogenic
    Forumite
    Folk may have seen this idea before for wave power generation, as it's been tested before. Now we have the start of the assembly phase in Israel for more testing. Loads of energy in waves, in fact so much energy that it has a nasty habit of breaking generation equipment.

    Israeli wave device receives first floaters

    The first set of floaters and supporting structures for Eco Wave Power’s grid-connected EWP-EDF One wave energy project have been delivered to the Jaffa Port site in Israel.

    The floaters were delivered in accordance with a collaboration agreement between EWP-EDF One and Lesico.

    The next step is the upcoming installation of the first floaters and support structures on the Jaffa Port breakwater later this month, Eco Wave Power said.

    System functionality and capacity tests will be conducted in the second quarter of this year, the company added.

    “Our goal is to generate electricity during the third quarter of this year.

    “This is a key milestone in the overall development of the Eco Wave Power technology, and the results are expected to enable us to take important steps toward the commercial rollout of our pioneering technology.”


    Mart. Cardiff. 5.58 kWp PV systems (3.58 ESE & 2.0 WNW)

    For general PV advice please see the PV FAQ thread on the Green & Ethical Board.
  • thevillathevilla Forumite
    123 Posts
    100 Posts Third Anniversary
    Forumite
    That's quite some storage facility, the scale of which we can perhaps only dream of here in the UK. Guess the terrain here doesn't lend itself to structures of such scale and if it did then the environmental impact would likely bring it into serious question.
    China is often painted as the bad guy when it comes to climate change but they do now appear to have a strong focus on renewables.

    State Grid of China switches on world’s largest pumped-hydro station

    Located in China’s Hebei province, the 3.6GW facility consists of 12 reversible pump generating sets with a capacity of 300MW each and has a storage capacity of 6.612 billion kWh.

    The State Grid Corporation of China, which is China’s largest state-owned grid operator and power utility, has commissioned, last week, the 3.6GW Fengning Pumped Storage Power Station, a pumped-storage hydroelectric power station located in Hebei province.

    The construction of the $1.87 billion project, which was implemented in two 1.8GW phases, was started by engineering company China Gezhouba Group Company Limited in 2014.




    Ello mate. Brill scheme, not knocking it, but of course I have to jump to the defence of the Welsh, by pointing out that Dinorwig is an impressive 50% of the size of this Chinese scheme.

    It has half the turbines (also 300MW each) so a potential generation of 1.8GW, and if cycled once per day, also has half the energy capacity at ~3.3TWh pa.

    Insert joke about the Chinese copying what others have done?   ;)

    And well worth a visit; especially around tea time when the turbines are spinning 😀
  • CoastalwatchCoastalwatch Forumite
    2.4K Posts
    1,000 Posts Fourth Anniversary Name Dropper
    Forumite
    thevilla said:
    Ello mate. Brill scheme, not knocking it, but of course I have to jump to the defence of the Welsh, by pointing out that Dinorwig is an impressive 50% of the size of this Chinese scheme.

    It has half the turbines (also 300MW each) so a potential generation of 1.8GW, and if cycled once per day, also has half the energy capacity at ~3.3TWh pa.

    Insert joke about the Chinese copying what others have done?   ;)

    And well worth a visit; especially around tea time when the turbines are spinning 😀

    Thanks TV. Perhaps we'll have to take it on board when we come across to visit Graig Fatha later in the spring. :)
    East coast, lat 51.97. 8.26kw SSE, 23° pitch + 0.59kw WSW vertical. Nissan Leaf plus Zappi charger and 2 x ASHP's. Three Givenergy 8.2 kWh batts & 3.0 kW ac inverter. Still waiting for V2H. CoCharger Host, Interest in Ripple Energy & Abundance.
  • edited 6 January at 6:19PM
    Swan_ValleySwan_Valley Forumite
    51 Posts
    10 Posts Name Dropper
    Forumite
    edited 6 January at 6:19PM
    thevilla said:
    Ello mate. Brill scheme, not knocking it, but of course I have to jump to the defence of the Welsh, by pointing out that Dinorwig is an impressive 50% of the size of this Chinese scheme.

    It has half the turbines (also 300MW each) so a potential generation of 1.8GW, and if cycled once per day, also has half the energy capacity at ~3.3TWh pa.

    Insert joke about the Chinese copying what others have done?   ;)

    And well worth a visit; especially around tea time when the turbines are spinning 😀

    Thanks TV. Perhaps we'll have to take it on board when we come across to visit Graig Fatha later in the spring. :)
    Check to see if it has re-opened before you arrange to visit. We were hoping to visit it last October when in the area, but it is closed for refurbishment. https://electricmountain.co.uk/Tours

    Electric Mountain Temporary Closure

    The Electric Mountain Visitor Centre is now closed to continue with its refurbishment and upgrading. As of yet, we do not have a confirmed date of reopening, however we will keep all our visitors updated on our website and social media.

    South Wales. SolarEdge 4kWp West + 6kWp East plus 2xGivEnergy 8.2kWh Batteries. 2xA2A ASHP's + MVHR.                                     Kia e-Soul 1st Edition & Renault Zoe Iconic BEV's. Go Faster & Ripple WT1 + Abundance.
  • Martyn1981Martyn1981 Forumite
    13.1K Posts
    Part of the Furniture 10,000 Posts Name Dropper Photogenic
    Forumite
    Just like a post I've popped on the solar news thread, this item jumped out at me more because of the technicalities than the wind farm itself.

    What caught my attention was this bit:

    The new consent will give the Lewis Wind Power JV team the option of using the very latest onshore wind turbines on the market, which we believe may be necessary to generate power at the cost required to compete for long-term contracts in the government-backed auction taking place this year, EDF said.

    The consented design features up to 24 turbines with a tip height of up to 180 metres and nine turbines with a tip height of up to 156 metres.

    This is compared with a maximum of 36 turbines at up to 145 metres in the project’s earlier consent from 2012, which was then amended in 2015.

    Just thought it was fun to point out how these schemes (in the RE pipeline) get revised over time, and how the technology is constantly developing, in this case leading to a 33% reduction in WT's, but significantly larger WT's being deployed. It also goes to show how long the process can be, though this may not be down to delays, just the fact that schemes are submitted well ahead of time, and then slowly 'polished' as the developers work through them.

    The consent comes after two rounds of community consultation on the company’s proposals, with public exhibitions at Stornoway Town Hall in October 2018 and February 2019.

    EDF JV secures new consent for Stornoway wind farm


    Mart. Cardiff. 5.58 kWp PV systems (3.58 ESE & 2.0 WNW)

    For general PV advice please see the PV FAQ thread on the Green & Ethical Board.
  • QrizBQrizB Forumite
    7.3K Posts
    1,000 Posts First Anniversary Photogenic Name Dropper
    Forumite
    Just thought it was fun to point out how these schemes (in the RE pipeline) get revised over time, and how the technology is constantly developing, in this case leading to a 33% reduction in WT's, but significantly larger WT's being deployed.
    Similarly with Ripple, the turbine they've just erected was bigger than any of the ones already present on the adjacent site but is also one of the last of its kind with new ones being significantly more powerful.
    PS if you're an infrastructure geek, this map is fascinating:
    https://openinframap.org/
    Graig Fatha isn't marked yet but is roughly here:
    https://openinframap.org/#14.05/51.55842/-3.43106
    N. Hampshire, he/him. Octopus Go elec & Tracker gas / Voda BB / Virgin mobi.
    2.72kWp PV facing SSW installed Jan 2012. 11 x 247w panels, 2.5kw inverter. 27MWh generated, long-term average 2.6 Os.
    Ofgem caps explained - October 2021 and April 2022
  • Martyn1981Martyn1981 Forumite
    13.1K Posts
    Part of the Furniture 10,000 Posts Name Dropper Photogenic
    Forumite
    Having followed the news of Adani (and others) for nearly a decade, I found this article interesting as it effectively tells a 10yr story about demand for coal from Australia, from booming expectations for ever greater needs in Asia, through a slowly reducing expansion. These new Aussie megamines were touted at upto 330m tonnes pa, but now might not exceed 10m.

    My understanding is that coal demand is still rising, but slowly now, as developed nations reduce consumption, and developing nations, whose populations are consuming more energy, are expanding RE and reducing their expansion (hope that makes sense) of FF generation. A real race against time, but RE having benefitted from a shift in the economics over the last decade, so there is hope.

    After Adani: whatever happened to Queensland’s Galilee basin coal boom?

    Queensland’s huge untapped Galilee coal basin was touted as a jobs and revenue bonanza by its supporters, with the potential to liberate hundreds of millions of tonnes of harmful greenhouse gases.

    The Galilee’s potential as a “carbon bomb” was wrapped up in a dozen or more coalmining projects and estimates of billions of dollars of investment.

    So far, just one project has made it through the starting gate – Adani’s controversial Carmichael mine, which sent its first coal to port late last year. The mine was supposed to be the first of many.

    Yet there is little sign of more coal to come, with many projects shelved, lapsed or discontinued, and uncertain futures for those that remain.

    Tim Buckley, an energy market analyst at the pro-renewables Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis, says when the Galilee projects were proposed, they threatened to become “a climate bomb that was unparalleled”.

    “All but one didn’t even get out of the starting blocks and I think none will,” he says.

    Buckley says the entire economic rationale for coal has changed since the projects were announced.

    “A decade ago it was about catering for a growth in demand in energy across Asia,” he says. “But now it is about decarbonisation. It is accepted now that coal is on a slow but terminal decline. The world is completely different now.”
    In a statement, the Queensland resources minister, Scott Stewart, said the “development of any specific project is a matter for the relevant company”.

    He said the government had “long held the position that we support resources projects which stack up financially, environmentally and socially”.

    Stewart said the plan would look at “taking advantage of the worldwide demand for new economy minerals which are critical as part of clean energy technology like batteries and renewables”.

    Mart. Cardiff. 5.58 kWp PV systems (3.58 ESE & 2.0 WNW)

    For general PV advice please see the PV FAQ thread on the Green & Ethical Board.
  • Martyn1981Martyn1981 Forumite
    13.1K Posts
    Part of the Furniture 10,000 Posts Name Dropper Photogenic
    Forumite
    Article here on four large forms of energy storage. Nothing new, I think we've talked about them all for years, but nice to see the issue in the mainstream media.

    Just to say that whilst concentrating solar is a valid way to store energy overnight, I think including it in a list for the UK, may be a bit of a slip up.

    Here’s how to solve the UK energy crisis for the long term – store more power

    Soaring energy bills rooted in a global gas supply crunch have focused minds on the age-old problem: how can we better store power?

    Attention has turned to the closure of the Rough gas storage facility in the North Sea in 2017, which left the UK with only enough storage to meet the demand of four to five winter days.

    But while gas is being phased out, Britain’s growing reliance on renewables, such as offshore wind and solar, does not solve the problem of intermittency – what happens when the wind does not blow or the sun does not shine.

    The key to securing enough affordable, low-carbon energy is more storage to make the most of the renewable energy available. A storage boom has been forecast over the coming decade as governments race to meet their climate targets.

    Within the next five years, the International Energy Agency (IEA) expects global energy storage capacity to expand by 56% to reach more than 270 GW by 2026, driven by a growing need to create flexible electricity systems which rely more on renewable sources.


    Mart. Cardiff. 5.58 kWp PV systems (3.58 ESE & 2.0 WNW)

    For general PV advice please see the PV FAQ thread on the Green & Ethical Board.
Sign In or Register to comment.
Latest News and Guides