New Post Advanced Search
Important update! We have recently reviewed and updated our Forum Rules and FAQs. Please take the time to familiarise yourself with the latest version.

Planning for death - forum discussion

edited 16 October 2012 at 12:44PM in Deaths, Funerals & Probate
105 replies 37.9K views
15791011

Replies

  • I have read through the excellent factsheet and also the posts on this forum, and I note that the factsheet suggests that one should obtain 5 copies of the death certificate, when registering a death, and posts to the forum have suggested 6 copies. The last time I acted as executor I found that 6 certificates was more than enough. However, that was 20 years ago and the posts on this forum that also advised obtaining 6 copies, were made in 2012. I was wondering therefore, whether anyone has had any more recent experience suggesting one should obtain a larger number. If so, how many death certificates should we get? My sister has an appointment tomorrow with the registrar to register the death, and her husband is firmly of the opinion that 6 is not enough. (He won't say how many, though.)

    Thank you for your help.
  • Savvy_SueSavvy_Sue Forumite
    42.5K posts
    Part of the Furniture 10,000 Posts Name Dropper
    ✭✭✭✭✭
    It depends. How many bank accounts / share holdings / other financial institutions are there? And how will they be notified of the death? Are the executors dealing with the estate remotely, or are they on the spot?

    I found with both Mum and Dad that I could generally take a death certificate in to any branch of any of their banks, get them to copy and certify it, and walk away with the original in my hand. Only had to post one off in a couple of cases, and they came back promptly.

    We had ten, between two executors dealing with different 'bits', and I'm sure my co-executor used more than I did, but then he was dealing with the share certificates and I was dealing with the banks! I definitely didn't need as many as five.
    Still knitting!
    Completed: TWO adult cardigans, 3 baby jumpers, 3 shawls, 1 sweat band, 3 pairs baby bootees, 2 sets of handwarmers, 1 Wise Man Knitivity figure + 1 sheep, 2 pairs socks, 3 balaclavas, multiple hats and poppies, 3 peony flowers, 4 butterflies ...
    Current projects: pink balaclava (for myself), seaman's hat, about to start another cardigan!
  • Thank you. A quick supplementary, if anyone can help. Where the shares are in companies that use the same registrars, e.g. Equiniti, could I get away with sending one letter and one certificate covering all the shareholdings? Or are the registrars likely to demand an original certificate for each company's records?

    Thank you for your help.
  • Yorkshireman99Yorkshireman99 Forumite
    5.5K posts
    ✭✭✭✭
    Thank you. A quick supplementary, if anyone can help. Where the shares are in companies that use the same registrars, e.g. Equiniti, could I get away with sending one letter and one certificate covering all the shareholdings? Or are the registrars likely to demand an original certificate for each company's records?

    Thank you for your help.
    Phone them and ask is the quickest way to find out.
  • jolizziejolizzie Forumite
    28 posts
    10 Posts
    Any help advice in putting my impeding house purchase in the names of my 2 children?
    I totally trust them and don't want to see my money going to pay for any care I may need.
    Is there any tax extras for them
    Do I need to live for 7 years
    Help......
  • Important update! We have recently reviewed and updated our Forum Rules and FAQs. Please take the time to familiarise yourself with the latest version.
  • Yorkshireman99Yorkshireman99 Forumite
    5.5K posts
    ✭✭✭✭
    jolizzie wrote: »
    Any help advice in putting my impeding house purchase in the names of my 2 children?
    I totally trust them and don't want to see my money going to pay for any care I may need.
    Is there any tax extras for them
    Do I need to live for 7 years
    Help......
    Doing that may not avoid the house being sold to pay for care. What you are proposing may be regarded as being deprivation of assets. The other thing is since you would remain in occupation it would not reduce the value of your estate since it would be a "gift with reservation". The children would be subject to capital gains tax when they eventually sel the property.
  • VfM4meplseVfM4meplse
    34.3K posts
    I've been Money Tipped!
    ✭✭✭✭✭
    Reading through this thread has left me absolutely drained. Coping with the emotional aspects of death are bad enough, I couldn't bear to leave my executor / beneficiary with a financial headache to boot. My will is going to be more complicated than I had originally thought so I need to make sure everything is covered :(

    Just to check: can life interest gifts be made to any beneficiary? All the examples I have seen relate to spouses / tenants in common.
    Value-for-money-for-me-puhleeze!

    "No man is worth, crawling on the earth"- adapted from Bob Crewe and Bob Gaudio

    Hope is not a strategy :D...A child is for life, not just 18 years....Don't get me started on the NHS, because you won't win...I love chaz-ing!
  • Yorkshireman99Yorkshireman99 Forumite
    5.5K posts
    ✭✭✭✭
    VfM4meplse wrote: »
    Reading through this thread has left me absolutely drained. Coping with the emotional aspects of death are bad enough, I couldn't bear to leave my executor / beneficiary with a financial headache to boot. My will is going to be more complicated than I had originally thought so I need to make sure everything is covered :(

    Just to check: can life interest gifts be made to any beneficiary? All the examples I have seen relate to spouses / tenants in common.
    Life interest gifts can be given to anyone but will not reduce IHT or avoid paying for care fees. You really must get paid for professional advice on this sort of thing. It is not a job for well meaning amateurs.
  • securityguysecurityguy Forumite
    2.4K posts
    Seventh Anniversary 1,000 Posts Combo Breaker
    ✭✭✭✭
    "You really must get paid for professional advice on this sort of thing"

    Indeed. And advice from someone disinterested who is not trying to sell you a scheme.
  • Yorkshireman99Yorkshireman99 Forumite
    5.5K posts
    ✭✭✭✭
    "You really must get paid for professional advice on this sort of thing"

    Indeed. And advice from someone disinterested who is not trying to sell you a scheme.
    Go to a STEP qualified solicitor first. They should be able to save you the cost of their fees and more.
Sign In or Register to comment.

Quick links

Essential Money | Who & Where are you? | Work & Benefits | Household and travel | Shopping & Freebies | About MSE | The MoneySavers Arms | Covid-19 & Coronavirus Support