Great 'what do you pay more for if you're poor?' Hunt

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  • Olipro
    Olipro Posts: 717 Forumite
    what do you pay more for if you're poor? money.

    someone's probably already said it, but if you're poor, you're very likely to be borrowing money in one form or another, and therefore paying for it.
  • walesrob
    walesrob Posts: 1,150 Forumite
    public transport is another, especially as they charge more in 'peak times', ie when people are going to work, going to school, to college and the rest, so its a tax on everyone getting up early pretty much.

    A good example is the bus company around here:

    Before 9am atm £8 after Jan 8th - £10!

    After 9am atm £4.50 after Jan 8th - £4.90.

    If this isn't a tax on leaving the house in the morning, (and bus, trains and planes all do the same), then I don't know what is!

    Whats worse is that if you need the all day one its pretty much a quarter of your money gone each week on bus fares!

    The government that brings in the liveable £7.50 per hour wage will have my vote in the next election (which may eventually be sooner than we think!)

    A tax on people getting up early? :rotfl:

    Meanwhile, in the real world: Supply and demand? Peak and off-peak? Profit and loss? Not heard of those?

    Have you not considered cheaper ways? Walking? Bicycle? Car share?
  • ixwood
    ixwood Posts: 2,550 Forumite
    Jacks_xxx wrote: »
    I think that's the prejudice that people on low incomes and fixed incomes face.

    I despise companies like BrightHouse for preying on the vulnerable, you think it's the vulnerable people's fault.

    Horses for courses I suppose.

    Money is a finite resource. if you don't have much of it and it's all already allocated, then what do you do when the washing machine or the lawn mower blows up?

    So it's got nothing to do with the people choosing to waste their already low amount of money then? People make decisions. I don't like the companies that rip people off, but they're only serving a market. If people didn't use them, they wouldn't exist.

    I'd allocate the money better, but obviously poor people can't be expected to budget or plan for these completely predictable and inevitable expenses, so putting myself in the situation of the washing machine breaking with no money, I'd ask around and see if anyone was getting rid of an old one and try freecycle, or ebay for a cheap 2nd hand one.

    I certainly wouldn't go and spend a lot of money on a new one, or get myself into debt over it.

    It's these decisions and a disregard for sensible planning and budgeting and a lack of respect for money that can cause problems.

    The lower your income, the less you should use credit, not the other way round as is often the case. People see being poor an a legitimate reason for getting into debt for some reason, which just means that they've got even less money because they're paying interest.
  • Jacks_xxx
    Jacks_xxx Posts: 3,874 Forumite
    ixwood wrote: »
    So it's got nothing to do with the people choosing to waste their already low amount of money then? People make decisions. I don't like the companies that rip people off, but they're only serving a market. If people didn't use them, they wouldn't exist.

    I'd allocate the money better, but obviously poor people can't be expected to budget or plan for these completely predictable and inevitable expenses, so putting myself in the situation of the washing machine breaking with no money, I'd ask around and see if anyone was getting rid of an old one and try freecycle, or ebay for a cheap 2nd hand one.

    I certainly wouldn't go and spend a lot of money on a new one, or get myself into debt over it.

    It's these decisions and a disregard for sensible planning and budgeting and a lack of respect for money that can cause problems.

    The lower your income, the less you should use credit, not the other way round as is often the case. People see being poor an a legitimate reason for getting into debt for some reason, which just means that they've got even less money because they're paying interest.

    Citing Freecycle and eBay assumes that people have computers and cars, and a Paypal account, a bank account, and money to pay for it.

    This whole thread has been about challenging the assumptions that everybody has these things.

    The rest of your post seems unable to conceive of a situation where financial hardship was not the people concerned's own fault.

    I can.

    It's not a market with all the rational free will and options that concept implies, it's a last resort when the few other options exist are even worse.
    Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted. Einstein
  • Barbarataba11
    Barbarataba11 Posts: 2 Newbie
    edited 2 February 2011 at 4:29PM
    Pretty much everything from my experience. Now in a position that I can't save (due to debt after graduating last year), so there's no financial cushion for life's nasty little surprises - dental treatment, or doctor prescription, boiler breaking down, flooded bathroom (increased home insurance premium etc.). It almost feels as if it's a crime to be poor. You're pretty much penalised by credit companies/banks etc. in trying to get any credit; pay higher fees if you don't pay by direct debit or pay online; as someone's mentioned on this forum, living in a poorer area, you often find cashpoints are chargeable. Also having access to affordable healthy food (local markets being closed down for fruit & veg, meat etc. forget about shopping organic!! Or if you have specific dietary needs. Everyone needs access to good food to keep your health in check. Sigh! Positive spin on things? hoping & believing that I can get out of this rut. If I could turn back time, I never would have signed up to a credit card. Would have tried to save up for what I wanted (& waited ages to get what I needed). There are some very smug people out there who can obviously afford to be flippant in their comments about being more responsible with their spending and budgeting - shoe on the other foot, when the options left open to you are more costly, but you still need to travel to work, provide for your children, pay your mortgage or rent etc. honestly what are your choices?? They are limited and tend to be very expensive! Go figure. Quite a few people have been forced into the position of a reduced income (& not through choice) over the last couple of years, & now have the hard task of getting back on their feet financially. Yet, the government is forcing the poorer in society to bear the brunt of getting out of the economic crisis.
  • Maat
    Maat Posts: 478 Forumite
    First Anniversary Combo Breaker First Post
    My son is asthmatic, he's already struggling to cope with the weather, I too am asthmatic and have recently suffered from a severe chest infection. If I am ill that means I can't care for my mother who needs that support. I shouldn't need to explain that though, not everyone has exactly the same circumstances surely?

    Loki, as someone who had the most severe asthma for many years, try this. Put your child on a milk-free diet. I was already vegetarian but my asthma was getting worse and worse and I thought I'd be dead within a few years. Then I went vegan - not for health reasons, that's just a bonus, I just didn't wanna cause harm to other sentient creatures - but in a few weeks the asthma had gone completely. This means checking processed foods for milk and cheese, it means checking out veg milks (soya, rice, almond, oat), cheeses (try Bute Island Foods and Tofutti - yumfest) and it maybe means cooking more, but this is your child we're talking about and, believe me, it's worth it.

    If you wanna give me your email address I can send you milk-free recipes. I'm willing to bet your son would be asthma-free within a month - if you have the courage to go for it. The bonus is with my recipes you wouldn't be hurting other creatures either. Is this the right time to mention my chocolate fudge cake recipe? Ok, time to admit I'm a 'foodie' (most vegans are). For foodie read 'greedy biatch'. By going vegan I had to give up absolutely nothing and I found so much pleasure, so much taste, so much breath!! Let me know if I can help you and your son too, I'd be delighted :)

    Sue
  • Maat
    Maat Posts: 478 Forumite
    First Anniversary Combo Breaker First Post
    ixwood wrote: »
    So it's got nothing to do with the people choosing to waste their already low amount of money then? People make decisions. I don't like the companies that rip people off, but they're only serving a market. If people didn't use them, they wouldn't exist.

    I'd allocate the money better, but obviously poor people can't be expected to budget or plan for these completely predictable and inevitable expenses, so putting myself in the situation of the washing machine breaking with no money, I'd ask around and see if anyone was getting rid of an old one and try freecycle, or ebay for a cheap 2nd hand one.

    I certainly wouldn't go and spend a lot of money on a new one, or get myself into debt over it.

    It's these decisions and a disregard for sensible planning and budgeting and a lack of respect for money that can cause problems.

    The lower your income, the less you should use credit, not the other way round as is often the case. People see being poor an a legitimate reason for getting into debt for some reason, which just means that they've got even less money because they're paying interest.

    Now there's someone who's never been poor. When you're poor you grasp at anything you think might help you. You believe it when sales people tell you their bullsomething. If you have kids you wanna do the best for them and that best might seem like picking up things you can't really afford but that a plausible salesperson might tell you is possible.

    btw what school did you go to that taught 'sensible planning' and 'budgeting'? Mine didn't and I suspect none do (none that I ever heard of anyway). The more desperate you are the more vulnerable you tend to be. It's easy to resist when you're doing ok, when you know where the money for your bills is coming from. Far harder when you've been oppressed all your life through poverty and someone offers you what you pray is a way out for you.

    Stick your judgementalism where the sun don't shine. Live a year in the hell of having no money even for food and then talk to me. Anything prior to that I reserve the right to ignore.
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