Question regarding school day out.

edited 6 September 2010 at 1:39PM in Marriage, Relationships & Families
78 replies 7.2K views
mspigmspig Forumite
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edited 6 September 2010 at 1:39PM in Marriage, Relationships & Families
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  • I have to say, there is little enough praise and encouragment for our young people so I would be absolutely delighted that my child and their peers had been selected for such a treat. I would also thank the staff for giving up their free time to accompany them and would pay up with a smile.
  • AlikayAlikay Forumite
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    It's on a Saturday, it's optional, it's a non-educational outing as a reward for the kids, and parents get a couple of child-free Christmas shopping hours with a teacher giving up their time to be the accompanying adult.

    Why do you think a contribution should come from the school's (probably over-stretched) budget?
  • Gingham_RibbonGingham_Ribbon Forumite
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    Sorry. I think it sounds like his form teacher has decided to give up a day to get the kids together outside of school and have some fun as a way of congratulating them for putting the effort in and as a way of spending some social time with each other in a relaxed setting.

    I would be shaking his hand and offering to come along and help out for the day.

    Tehre's a good chance that this has been supported by the school, but it's the teacher's doing.
    May all your dots fall silently to the ground.
  • mspig i agree with you.
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  • Gingham_RibbonGingham_Ribbon Forumite
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    mspig wrote: »
    Its actually not the contribution as such that gets me but if we've got to take the kids to the centre and pay for everything including dinner and then collect them afterwards, where is the praise from the school, thats what i feel is missing that it can't be labelled as a special treat/reward if the parents are paying.

    If it was down on the letter as just a day out then i would understand or even a trip out with school but its wrote down as a treat/reward, and i feel that its wrong to label it that if school are not making a contribution to it, apart form one teachers time. There not even booking the laser quest but just turning up (as letter states).
    In other words, teachers can do no right so they might as well not bother.
    May all your dots fall silently to the ground.
  • mspig wrote: »
    My question is if the school is doing this as a reward for their good behaviour etc surely they should be paying something towards the morning out, as all i can see is one of the teachers is meeting the 18 pupils (if they all go) at the centre and then making sure there picked up afterwards. Not much contribution going on for a praise trip out.

    Perhaps its just me, as i just don't see much of the school praising the kids if its done out of school time and the parents are taking, collecting and paying for their child to go.

    I suspect the school can't afford to make a financial contribution towards the day, but the teacher giving up their time freely is a huge contribution IMO. If you can afford to send him, that's great, although I would really feel for anyone not able to make the financial contribution.

    This type of reward recognition is so rare that you and your son must be so proud that he has been chosen to go. The treat really is the recognition, amongst their peer group whom are their main influencer throughout their teenage years. I don't think it's fair to say it's not a treat because you have to pay for it. (I'm sure a lot more parents would complain if the school were to pay for it!)

    I would imagine that as your son is at high school, you may have the option to use public transport, cycle or a lift share if you are unable to transport him.

    Try to see this for what it is, because it really is (sadly) incredible that the school are doing it.
  • In other words, teachers can do no right so they might as well not bother.


    Sadly that was my impression too.

    But I can tell you, as a parent of two 'role model' children in school (school's words ;)), it hacks me off beyond belief the recognition that the generally disruptive children get in class. I don't understand the thinking behind collective punishment at all, particularly since they don't reward exemplary behaviour to compensate. Grrr; enjoy the laser quest. :)
  • My DS's school do something similar for those with most merits each year. it is done during school time - bowling / lumch / snooker.

    The parents association pay for it and they are accompanied by a couple of teachers. It goes down very well
  • RobertoMoirRobertoMoir Forumite
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    mspig wrote: »
    Its actually not the contribution as such that gets me but if we've got to take the kids to the centre and pay for everything including dinner and then collect them afterwards, where is the praise from the school, thats what i feel is missing that it can't be labelled as a special treat/reward if the parents are paying.

    If it was down on the letter as just a day out then i would understand or even a trip out with school but its wrote down as a treat/reward, and i feel that its wrong to label it that if school are not making a contribution to it, apart form one teachers time. There not even booking the laser quest but just turning up (as letter states).

    Yes of course the school should spend its own money on this stuff. If they didn't then it would only be wasted on proper learning resources and adequate staffing and other non essentials. And what would be the point of that?
    If you don't stand for something, you'll fall for anything
  • tandraigtandraig Forumite
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    I agree with Mspig here - why label it a treat from the school when its really from the parents? surely the school could have found a way to recognise these kids exemplary behaviour without it costing the parents money. At my old school (admittedly it was many many moons ago) good behaviour etc was rewarded with a certificate or book tokens or if whole class was good (an event so rare it that if it happened it was almost national newsworthy) a half day off from school.
    At this time of year not many parents have enough spare cash for this sort of thing - and some may be struggling with real financial hardship - so their kids cannot go - how is this rewarding them?
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