Disabled parking bays

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Replies

  • Or be polite and say you're a bankruptee and hence have no bank account.

    After all they are only doing a job, just like you are.


    If you want to takle the charities then takle them direct, or lobby to get Camalot banned from selling scratch cards, and let charities sell them again

    Pak

    p.s this has wondered off the point about Disabled Vs Parent bays
  • Can anyone explain in a pleasant manner why parent and children need special parking spaces, as opposed to the rest of society.

    I can understand people with a disability needing to park by the door, but find it difficult to accept that just because you have a child on board you expect the same facility.
  • PalPal Forumite
    2.1K Posts
    Parents and children do not need to be near the door but they need to be near the trolleys (for when you are unloading you car and have to leave your kids in the car while you quickly put the trolley back), and you also need a wider parking space so that you can open car doors fully to get the kids in and out of their seats and move prams about etc.

    It is not until you have kids that you realise what a pain normal parking spaces can be!

    Personally I think parent and child spaces should be the furthest away from the entrance so that other people wouldn't want to park in them.  Disabled spaces should of course be nearer the entrance.
  • Patrick I love the comment , I wonder if your life will ever change if you have children or will you feel the same .
    Or you may have some little rug rats already?
    Anything that helps with trolleys and a bit of extra space all helps.
    'The path of the righteous man is beset on all sides with the iniquities of the selfish and the tyranny of evil men. Blessed is he who in the name of charity and good will shepherds the weak through the valley of darkness, for he is truly his brother's keeper and the finder of lost children. And I will strike down upon those with great vengeance and with furious anger those who attempt to poison and destroy my brothers.
  • Ok I have been abused on here for not taking up my disabled rights.
    I currently have a 52% disability but this is not permanent due to ongoing long term treatment.
    So what am I entitled do re parking if anything
    'The path of the righteous man is beset on all sides with the iniquities of the selfish and the tyranny of evil men. Blessed is he who in the name of charity and good will shepherds the weak through the valley of darkness, for he is truly his brother's keeper and the finder of lost children. And I will strike down upon those with great vengeance and with furious anger those who attempt to poison and destroy my brothers.
  • SystemSystem Forumite, Community Admin
    177.9K Posts
    10,000 Posts Name Dropper
    Community Admin
    Dont people in the petrol station look then? Im confused. :'(
  • PalPal Forumite
    2.1K Posts
    Further to my comment above about parent & child spaces, can someone explain why disabled spaces need to be near the entrance to a supermarket?

    I can understand that larger spaces placed near the trolley drop off points would be required, but if a disabled person can get around long supermarket aisles then why can they not get themselves 100 yards across a car park? Does the extra 100 yards make a difference?

    Given the choice would you rather have to travel the extra 100 yards across the car park but be guaranteed an extra large space, or travel 100 yards less and have to fight ignorant drivers for it?

    I am not having a dig - just asking a question. I assume the answer has something to do with the nature of peoples disability, but given the size of current supermarkets I can't help thinking that the problem might be solved by making the disabled spaces less attractive to other drivers.

    Would the same arguement apply to multistory carparks as long as the lifts are working and large enough to take wheelchairs?
  • minimini Forumite
    833 Posts
    I hate to agree with Pal :o but

    with parent and child spaces the important factors are ideally being able to walk from store to car under cover in case of rain, the extra room is useful when you need to open the door a lot to fasten seatbelts and also being able to return your trolley closer to where you have parked so you can still see your kids in car, a local Tesco has redesigned it's car park & made the parent & chuild spaces back to the normal size & put them by the entrance, not much is to be gained from that given everyone else is parking in them. Not many supermarkets seem to have got the parent & child spaces right, maybe it's more of a token gesture they feel they should offer?

    With disabled spaces I presume it depends on factors affected by disability, if you are relying on the stores wheelchair facilities to get round the shop then presumably you would need to be by the store door.
  • lisyloolisyloo Forumite
    28.5K Posts
    Part of the Furniture 10,000 Posts Name Dropper
    Forumite
    As someone who occassionally has to push a (not so light) person in a wheelchair I might be able to shed a bit of light.

    The biggest problem with pushing someone in a wheelchair (especially if they are heavy or heavier than you) is uneven surfaces - such as channels for drainage.

    Any uneven surface is a nightmare.
    It isn't the distance from the store that's the problem in this case.

    With the specific case of a wheelchair I wouldn't have a problem with being 100 yards from the store IF the surface was flat.

    Problems with the road surface can cause seriously problems although we've only nearly tipped out the person in the chair once!

    BTW - we often take my mother-in-law to the DIY store to get things she needs.
    Obviously she doesn't do the DIY herself from her wheelchair - her son does it for her - but it doesn't mean that she isn't entitled to go to the shop and choose what colour shelves she wants.

  • can someone explain why disabled spaces need to be near the entrance to a supermarket?

    .............

    Does the extra 100 yards make a difference?  

    Aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaagh!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    Not again.

    Not all disabled people are wheelchair users and an extra hundred yards or more does make a difference. My own disability of a weak and shortened right leg (caused by polio)has been worsened by 50 years of additional wear tear on an ankle that was originally untouched. I am fed up with having to explain that although I may be able to walk shortish distances every step I take gives additional wear and tear to my leg  that those without my disability would not suffer. In addition the supermarket trolly itself provides support so it easier to walk round the supermarket isles.

    Those people in a wheelchair need additional space beside their cars  to be able to get in and out of their cars. How about some thought for the helpers who push wheelchairs!

    On balance then the closer the disabled bays are to the entrance the better.
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