Help, Soup Mix!

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  • noonesperfectnoonesperfect Forumite
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    What ios the power of your slow cooker? It'll tell you on the bottom of the cooker casing. The power levels do seem to vary alarmingly.

    I've got a Morphy Richards 48710

    and it says on the bottom:-

    230v - 156W
    240v - 170W

    There's something about Hz as well, do you need to know that bit?

    I presume its the latter for the UK?
    :wave:
  • noonesperfectnoonesperfect Forumite
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    Well I had some of my soup for lunch and I'm still here! :rotfl:

    Very sustaining it was too though a bit more tomatoey than I'd anticipated. Yummy nevertheless and five portions are in the freezer for another day.
    :wave:
  • OlliebeakOlliebeak Forumite
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    Excellent, thank you..........bump!

    Because the weather was forecast mild for today I decided to shelve the stew idea and make some soup instead.

    I finely sliced green bits of leeks, pale green cauli leaves, grated carrot, stock cubes, water, curry powder, herbs, a couple of fresh tomatoes and a tin of tomatoes plus some broth mix (it had had about 3 hours soak).
    Anyway, I left it to cook on low overnight in my SC and after 9.5 hours everything is still somewhat "crunchy".
    I think I must have gone wrong somewhere, should I have brought it to the boil and then it to turned it low.
    I've transferred it to a saucepan now to cook on the hob for an hour. If anyone tried to eat the soup as was they would have had awful tummyache!

    Or is my SC underpowered in some way do you think?


    I presoak my soup and broth mix overnight and then rinse about three or four times the next morning. It then goes straight into my SC with my meat and vegetables. Then I boil some water and dissolve a beef stock cube and a vegetable stock cube and pour the boiling water into the SC. Add some dried mixed herbs. Top the water level up to cover any potatoes that may be in the SC and set to HIGH (or AUTO if you have that setting). I would allow it to come to the boil for a while and then turn down the SC after about 4 hours and finish it off on LOW for another 3 or 4 hours (or leave on AUTO which will turn it down by itself).

    In fact that's what I've got planned for tomorrow - mmmmmmmm! I bet a couple of my kids will turn up around tea-time - they have built-in radar for when I cook 'scouse' in my SC.
  • noonesperfectnoonesperfect Forumite
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    Do you ever do "Blind Scouse" Olliebeak?

    Sorry, I had to ask, I'm a big fan of Katie Flynn, Helen Forrester novels........!

    Nothing wrong with the odd veggie meal IMO, I enjoy them for a change.
    :wave:
  • OlliebeakOlliebeak Forumite
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    Do you ever do "Blind Scouse" Olliebeak?

    Sorry, I had to ask, I'm a big fan of Katie Flynn, Helen Forrester novels........!

    Nothing wrong with the odd veggie meal IMO, I enjoy them for a change.

    My nan used to do 'blind scouse' when I was little. She would slice all the meat off the bone from a leg of lamb and put it to one side for the evening meal. Then the bone, a chopped onion, a grated carrot and some potatoes cut into chunks would all go in a pan and get covered with water. Salt and pepper added but no stock cube, brought to the boil and low-simmered for a couple of hours. This was always served for lunch on a Monday (wash day) because it didn't need 'looking after'. Any little scraps of meat still clinging to the bone would come off with the boiling and go into the 'blind scouse' and then the bone would be split and the marrow removed and put into the water as well for extra flavour and goodness.

    The meat that had been sliced off the bone would be served with chips, peas and gravy for tea on the Monday evening.
  • noonesperfectnoonesperfect Forumite
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    Olliebeak wrote: »
    My nan used to do 'blind scouse' when I was little. She would slice all the meat off the bone from a leg of lamb and put it to one side for the evening meal. Then the bone, a chopped onion, a grated carrot and some potatoes cut into chunks would all go in a pan and get covered with water. Salt and pepper added but no stock cube, brought to the boil and low-simmered for a couple of hours. This was always served for lunch on a Monday (wash day) because it didn't need 'looking after'. Any little scraps of meat still clinging to the bone would come off with the boiling and go into the 'blind scouse' and then the bone would be split and the marrow removed and put into the water as well for extra flavour and goodness.

    The meat that had been sliced off the bone would be served with chips, peas and gravy for tea on the Monday evening.

    Thank you Olliebeak,:T :A

    I misunderstood :rolleyes: . The way the novellists describe it, blind scouse is made to sound like nothing but a water and vegetable stew! So it's not entirely meat-free after all. I'm glad you've cleared that one up for me. I might have to re-read them all now I've a better understanding......if only I had the time. I should be in bed reading now :rotfl: :rotfl:
    :wave:
  • OlliebeakOlliebeak Forumite
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    Thank you Olliebeak,:T :A

    I misunderstood :rolleyes: . The way the novellists describe it, blind scouse is made to sound like nothing but a water and vegetable stew! So it's not entirely meat-free after all. I'm glad you've cleared that one up for me. I might have to re-read them all now I've a better understanding......if only I had the time. I should be in bed reading now :rotfl: :rotfl:

    Oh believe me, there is hardly any meat in it at all! We used to shout 'Hello, meat' if we found a piece! The only meat is any scraps that remained stuck to the bone, AFTER you had taken all the meat off for the evening meal. That would become dislodged into the blind scouse with the simmering. The marrow was lovely as well.
  • hollydayshollydays Forumite
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    That mix they make with pulses and grains,which type of soup recipes can you add it to. I have found a definite favourite with a minestrone recipe i was given on this board(Delia) although that contains macoroni.Is it better to go with certain ingrediants?
  • AddiscomberAddiscomber Forumite
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    We don't have a Morrisons here and I have never looked at anywhere else's equivalent, but isn't there a recipe suggestion on the packet? My mother used to make a thick soup with the last remnants of our Christmas turkey and used to add butter beans and pearl barley herself. I should think that adding a soup mix would have been much the same thing.
  • SazboSazbo Forumite
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    Hi. I would imagine that any chunky type of soup would be ok - vegetable, or scotch broth, that kind of thing?

    Here's Gingham's recipe for broth which uses Morrison's country soup mix.

    Saz x
    4 May 2010 <3
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