Great Cheap Ways To Make Your House Safer Hunt

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  • sleepy
    sleepy Posts: 391 Forumite
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    I want to put in outside security lights (the movement activated ones) but my partner says they have to be fitted by an electrician, and having just spent all our money on buying the house, we can't really afford electrician fees at the moment. Are there any you can fit yourelf simply?
  • gromituk
    gromituk Posts: 3,087 Forumite
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    This isn't true. PIR's effectiveness gets blocked by glass.

    Unfortunately not entirely, no. It is quite true that the sensitivity is reduced, but you cannot rely on a window to block it completely. When you consider that you have little control over what goes on outside your window, in terms of large, hot, fast-moving objects, then this explains the advice not to point PIR detectors at windows. If you can find some literature which recommends that you do (and not just that "PIR sensors don't work through glass", which is too gross a generalisation), then I'd be very interested to read it.

    Also, if I were a cheeky kid then I'd be tempted to try to set off a PIR sensor visible through a window. What could be more fun than to set off someone's burglar alarm without actually breaking into the house?

    "[font=Verdana,Tahoma,Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif][size=-1]PIR SENSORS:Try to mount the PIR’s in suitable positions to avoid false alarms from heaters, windows and post coming through the letterbox, etc. Central heating radiators are seldom a problem, but any CONVECTOR HEATERS will cause a lot of warm air movement that can trigger PIR’s if too close. Also, try to avoid pointing them towards the outside of a room, or into a bay window. Choose an appropriate corner of the room and point it towards the opposing corner." ( http://www.letsfixit.co.uk/html/burglar_alarms.html )


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    Time is an illusion - lunch time doubly so.
  • StickyD
    StickyD Posts: 12 Forumite
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    Becles wrote:
    I had a problem with children climbing over the 6 foot back fence to retrieve balls, rather than coming round and knocking on the door to ask for it back. I was worried in case they hurt themselves, and I was annoyed with damage to plants and my garden bench as they were climbing on that to get back over.

    I bought some anti-vandal paint which only cost a few pounds. I painted that on the top of the fence. It stays sticky like tar, so will make a right mess on them if they climb over. After a couple of sticky fingers cases, the problem was solved.
    http://www.coovar.co.uk/security_anticlimb.asp
  • Dora_the_Explorer_5
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    Just my twopennorth on security lights. Please, please, please ensure they don't shine into the windows of the properties opposite. It's no fun being woking up dozens of times every night becuase the bedroom is being lit up like something from Stalag 17 by the neighbour opposite's security light being tripped by cats, rats, and whatever else does it.
  • Bonhel
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    I got this system through a security company - a small device which connects to my intruder alarm. If the alarm goes off, I get a text msg on my mobile within 10 seconds. So does my brother, who lives near me, so if I'm away he will pop round and check it out....brother not available to do any body else though!.... well maybe for a big fee, so it might be better to get your own!!!
    The magic box cost me £95 including installation, and 24/7 monitoring at 50p per day for alert texts to two mobile phones. They are called IAS Ltd and you can contact them on 01282 711787. Worked for me last summer in Portugal, alarm went off, I got a text msg.... brother was on route.. cost me a cheap bottle of whiskey though. Worth it.
  • eamonn321
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    sleepy wrote:
    I want to put in outside security lights (the movement activated ones) but my partner says they have to be fitted by an electrician, and having just spent all our money on buying the house, we can't really afford electrician fees at the moment. Are there any you can fit yourelf simply?

    Just put a plug on the end after routing the cable through into the house and plug it in to the mains.
  • chumfatty
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    Seriously thou' in answer to all the people saying get an alarm connected to a response centre who will call the police.

    Moral of the story - don't rely on the police - secure yourself.

    If your alarm is connected to a response centre and you have more than one PIR activation, (ie kitchen then lounge activate consecutively) then this can more or less prove a genuine activation as the chance of two PIRs having a fault are far less likely than a false alarm. This information will then be passed on to the Police, who will respond immeadiatley because of the likelyhood of it being genuine and hopefully catching them in the act.

    You're quite right though, don't rely on the police, they can't be everywhere all the time, you have just as much responsibility to ensure your home is secure, and this can usually be done by following just some of the good advice on this thread.
  • scootermacc
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    Bonhel wrote:
    I got this system through a security company - a small device which connects to my intruder alarm. If the alarm goes off, I get a text msg on my mobile within 10 seconds. So does my brother, who lives near me, so if I'm away he will pop round and check it out....brother not available to do any body else though!.... well maybe for a big fee, so it might be better to get your own!!!
    The magic box cost me £95 including installation, and 24/7 monitoring at 50p per day for alert texts to two mobile phones. They are called IAS Ltd and you can contact them on 01282 711787. Worked for me last summer in Portugal, alarm went off, I got a text msg.... brother was on route.. cost me a cheap bottle of whiskey though. Worth it.

    Wow thats expensive. 50p a day? for 365 days = £182.50 a year!!! Is that really the case? This BT Home Monitor alarm kit I've got costs £60 a year and sends phone calls, text and email to THREE people. The kit cost more (£199 for mine), but I've seen them for around £99 recently on the web.
    Named after my cat, picture coming shortly
  • scootermacc
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    gromituk wrote:
    Unfortunately not entirely, no. It is quite true that the sensitivity is reduced, but you cannot rely on a window to block it completely. When you consider that you have little control over what goes on outside your window, in terms of large, hot, fast-moving objects, then this explains the advice not to point PIR detectors at windows. If you can find some literature which recommends that you do (and not just that "PIR sensors don't work through glass", which is too gross a generalisation), then I'd be very interested to read it.

    Also, if I were a cheeky kid then I'd be tempted to try to set off a PIR sensor visible through a window. What could be more fun than to set off someone's burglar alarm without actually breaking into the house?

    [/color][/size][/font]


    What you say is true. In my experience though mounting a sensor in the corner of a room where it takes in a window on the opposite side won't cause a problem. Mounting it 3 inches from a window pointing straight out will !!! Good thing about sensors? You can move them!

    I personally believe though that if someone IS peering through a window and happens to set the alarm off, thats a good thing, particularly if your alarm is monitored. We get asked about more and more early warning/perimeter protection systems nowadays - people DO want to know if some local kid is messing about on their property! Ideally then catch these people on camera too.
    Named after my cat, picture coming shortly
  • gromituk
    gromituk Posts: 3,087 Forumite
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    That's true if you can guarantee that the person is on your property. Most windows have a view beyond the property, though, leading to the possibility of your alarm being set off by perfectly innocent events. I presume when you talk about a monitored system you mean one which contacts you and not a third party (such as the police), because false alarms in the latter case are a very bad idea.
    Time is an illusion - lunch time doubly so.
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