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Great ‘How to haggle down rent’ Hunt - Page 7

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Great ‘How to haggle down rent’ Hunt

edited 30 November -1 at 1:00AM in House Buying, Renting & Selling
148 replies 71.4K views
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  • Out,_Vile_JellyOut,_Vile_Jelly Forumite
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    I've just started looking for a new place to rent and have specified to the LA I would prefer a professional, experienced LL who knows what they're doing. I looked at a couple of places last night and even the LA agreed one of them was stupidly overpriced. You only need to look at a handful of properties in the same area to see what you can get for your money and what's reasonable.
    They are an EYESORES!!!!
  • GingernutmegGingernutmeg Forumite
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    I don't see what the issue is here. Nobody is suggesting that evil tenants should be forcing landlords to beggar themselves so that they can rent a luxury home for peanuts.

    Ultimately, a landlord doesn't have to reduce the rent, or accept a lower rent - if a tenant can't or won't pay the higher rent, then the landlord can end the tenancy at the end of whatever fixed term and find new tenants who will pay what they want. If a landlord doesn't want to accept what a new potential tenant wants to pay for a property, then they don't have to and they can wait for tenants who will pay.

    There's no 'forcing' anyone to do anything here, and tenants are hardly 'getting ahead' by getting £20/£30 off the rent each month - it's a very hollow victory when you consider how precarious renting is anyway. That £240/£360 I save in a year probably won't even pay for a removal van the next time I have to move because the landlord wants to sell, or they've been repossessed, or they don't want to be a landlord anymore, or I'm having to move because they won't do repairs ... Please tell me how I'm 'getting ahead' here? And even a one month void is likely to cost a landlord more than that, not to mention the costs of getting a new tenant in a property, and the risk that the new tenant might not be as reliable as the old one ...

    I accept that there are small landlords who are feeling the pinch, but that's the same for EVERY small business. I don't see how this thread has suggested anything that isn't being thought by most landlords and tenants anyway.

  • A lot of landlords on this site have already said they factor a price drop into their asking price, as they expect to be offered a lower price.
    RENTING? Have you checked to see that your landlord has permission from their mortgage lender to rent the property? If not, you could be thrown out with very little notice.
    Read the sticky on the House Buying, Renting & Selling board.


  • In my region (Mid Devon) it seems the rental prices are holding or even increasing. There is a serious lack of any good quality rental property and with so many first time buyers unable to get on the property ladder they're turning to the rental market which has increased demand.

    Being a small town we didn't have many migrant workers so there isn't a sudden oversupply of property and the town isn't big enough to mean there are lots of cheap rental flats etc like in London.

    So if you want to be landlord, do it in a small town! :D

    Not much good unless you want to live with a bunch of inbred yokels though is it?
  • My step daughter and boyfriend are looking to rent right now and all they can find are agency managed properties. I object to paying £200 just to process their application (seems like money for old rope to me), but I havent seen anything advertised by LL's themselves.

    Also, the attitudes displayed by some of the staff really surprises me...trying to arrange viewings can be an incredibly frustrating process...do they not WANT to find tenants and make commission.

    Is it just a case of reading the local paper classifieds or is there a site somewhere that I don't know about?

    They and I would much rather them deal directly with a LL.
  • Important update! We have recently reviewed and updated our Forum Rules and FAQs. Please take the time to familiarise yourself with the latest version.
  • Thought I'd join to post on this.

    We are private LL and do not use an agent. We only have 16 tenants - so not a big landlord.

    My suggestion is to ask for a reduction in your rent - if the asking price is too high and you can prove it.

    If not expect to be refused and go in the knowledge that you may have wrecked the relationship with your landlord and that any future increases will probably be double of their other tenants until you leave.

    This also goes for tenenants that make a lot of contact (had people saying light bulbs have blown) and become a problem - you will not probably be asked to leave but your increases will go up more than others.

    The other aspect of this is we have some tenants we get on with really well and their rent has not increased for 7 years.

    We normally have one or two change overs a year from 16 tenants - this includes bedsits where we have one that has been there 13 years and one 11 years - so cannot be that bad.
  • Alan_Cross wrote: »
    Yep, he's promoting money saving by one section of his membership at the expense of another.

    Not the first time he's done this. He has 'previous'.

    It's a CONSUMER site. The whole site is designed for CONSUMERS to get a better deal from SUPPLIERS.

    You don't seem to have been vocally lobbying for a forum for supermarket executives to discuss ways to close reward point loopholes, or for suppliers to cut the margins on quidco....
  • madkitty wrote: »
    Im sorry but they are genuine - it is the legal responsibility of the landlord to make sure that the boiler is fully maintained and serviced and also according to my contract that the bushes are kept in order...im not throwing away £700 per month for the fun of it and so any minor issues should be resolved! Do you not think that perhaps the reason I have been in the same property for so long is because I am a good tenant!

    It's not the legal responsibility of the landlord to get the boiler serviced - they simply have to have the boiler and other gas appliances checked every year for gas safety. If the boiler's safe, it's the landlord's choice as to whether to have a service as well.

    Meanwhile there are millions of boilers going unserviced and without gas checks or smoke alarms in private homes, which is where the real problems lie. Perhaps one day the Government will do something about that rather than impose a never-ending set of restrictions of landlords!
  • My step daughter and boyfriend are looking to rent right now and all they can find are agency managed properties. I object to paying £200 just to process their application (seems like money for old rope to me), but I havent seen anything advertised by LL's themselves.

    Also, the attitudes displayed by some of the staff really surprises me...trying to arrange viewings can be an incredibly frustrating process...do they not WANT to find tenants and make commission.

    Is it just a case of reading the local paper classifieds or is there a site somewhere that I don't know about?

    They and I would much rather them deal directly with a LL.


    Braddersowl: you are looking in the wrong places. Yes, see the classified ads, but also Gumtree may be in your local area, or landlords advertise privately at www.spareroom.co.uk and www.intolondon.co.uk, and Loot, and AdTrader. I agree private letting agents charge a lot, which is why as a landlord I pay for private advertising and do all the maintenance myself, saving the tenant as well as myself a fortune in agency fees - but of course never a word in thanks from the tenant.
  • We have lived in the same place for nearly 6 years.

    In those six years we have only had our boiler checked for safety three times. It was due the year we moved in - we waited until the following Spring before it was done, then it was another year and a half before the next one and this time it was two and a half years before it was done again.

    When we spoke to the LL about it - he claimed it wasn't due, although he knew we had our certificate.

    Our LL won't do repairs to the property he is obliged to do and the property suffers from damp, the heating system is ancient, the timer on the central heating no longer works, the drainage system needs attention and there is more. Whenever we speak to him we get blamed and he comes round to do a bodge job. He has probably spent £150 on repairs over the course of 6 year. Compared to what we give him (in cash, yes folks he is on a tax dodge as well) this is minor. We give him £6,000 a year to live in our property, times that by six and it is loads.

    We would love to move but rents in this neck of the woods are still pricey, there is no way LL would take a reduction request on any property's we view. We can't afford to pay agency fees and we won't get our deposit back because that's the way he is - so we're stuck.

    We would like to deal with a LL privately and instead of asking for rent reduction we would ask if we could split the deposit over a few months. Has anyone had any experience of doing this successfully?
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