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Great ‘How to haggle down rent’ Hunt

edited 30 November -1 at 12:00AM in House Buying, Renting & Selling
148 replies 71.7K views
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  • I made an offer on a lovely 2 bed starter home to rent, as I understood, like buying .. 'that was the thing to do' .. haggle !

    The property was listed on a Friday morning, I viewed that afternoon and immediately made an offer. I waited until Saturday afternoon and heard nothing so I called the agent to be told that the viewers following me on that Saturday offered the full rental price

    So I stayed in a hotel for another month for the sake of £50 a month reduced monthly offer and losing a lovely riverside home

    My theory now .. if you want it, don’t haggle
  • I moved into a two bedroom house in the North Down area of Northern Ireland. Rent was initially set at £440 per month plus rates (the landlord said they would be about £40-50 per month) for a 6 month contract, the landlord would collect the rent in person each month.

    I asked the landlord if there was any room for negotiation on the rent. He asked me what I had in mind. So I suggested taking the house for 12 months at £425 with the landlord paying the rates. The landlord accepted. I think what clinched it was me also saying I would pay by standing order rather than him collecting the rent.
  • I'd be willing to look after the garden in return for cheaper rent.

    I think you will find that it's a standard clause that you are responsible for the garden anyway. What happens realistically is that tenants tend to let the garden go but have to hand it over as it was, or have gardening costs deducted from their deposit.

    I have to add however that I have been lucky enough to have had a few tenants that were quite keen to not only maintain the garden but actually improve it.
  • MSE_Jenny wrote: »
    The house price slump means there are more properties on the rental market, so tenants looking for a new pad may be able to haggle down the cost. We'd like to tap MoneySavers for their top tips on how to find a property’s market worth and negotiate down the cost.

    Are there ways to boost your bargaining power when looking for a new flat to rent, for example, by taking a place unfurnished or volunteering to do up the garden?

    [threadbanner]box[/threadbanner]

    I think it helps to choose WHEN you try move, you have a much better chance at certian times of the year depending on local markets.

    Looking in August round here (uni town/lots of language school students/tourists) slim chance.

    Mid-November much better chance as LL facing prospective Xmas void, a lot of people don't want to move around christmas/mid-term for schools etc... more properties where owner hasn't sold resigned to the fact they might have to wait for hte spring 'bounce' etc or given up.....
  • GingernutmegGingernutmeg Forumite
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    stevetodd wrote: »
    I think you will find that it's a standard clause that you are responsible for the garden anyway. What happens realistically is that tenants tend to let the garden go but have to hand it over as it was, or have gardening costs deducted from their deposit.

    I have to add however that I have been lucky enough to have had a few tenants that were quite keen to not only maintain the garden but actually improve it.

    Whenever I've rented it's always seemed to be the case that you pay a premium for houses with gardens/outside space. Maybe I'm naive, but it seems a bit daft to me to pay extra for outside space that you're not willing to maintain or really use, and risk loosing part of your deposit because of that. I like gardening, and I like having space to dry laundry etc, so I pay extra to have that space and accept I have to maintain it. But like I said, maybe I'm naive lol.

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  • Just a couple of points:

    The EPC is valid for 10 years. if an agent is saying a new one is required for each tenancy then they are either ignorant o r trying a fast one!

    It is a legal requirement for a gas appliance to have an annual gas safety inspection by a CORGI registered engineer. You must demand the landlord to do this as it is for your safety. If he refuses contact the local council.

    And finally, the biggest way to save money for tenants and landlords alike is DO NOT USE AN AGENT!!!!!!

    Having been a landlord for 10 years and never used an agent I was shocked at the cost they proposed when we looked at it last year - all in at least 6 weeks rent to find a tenant for the property. Their marketing was to stick an ad on gumtree, which I had done myself for free!

    Previously as a tenant I was just as shocked at the fees charged as well. Over £100 to draw up a tenancy agreement, which is a cut-and paste document already prepared; over £40 each for a credit check (these normally cost less than £10); and about £100 for the inventory check.
  • Whenever I've rented it's always seemed to be the case that you pay a premium for houses with gardens/outside space. Maybe I'm naive, but it seems a bit daft to me to pay extra for outside space that you're not willing to maintain or really use, and risk loosing part of your deposit because of that. I like gardening, and I like having space to dry laundry etc, so I pay extra to have that space and accept I have to maintain it. But like I said, maybe I'm naive lol.

    I (or I should say we as it was a house I bought jointly with my wife) asked our tenants what they wanted when they viewed the house which at the time we were refurbishing. We said that we would get a lawn layed, but they would have to maintain it and eventually hand it over in reasonable condition. They did go for it (we also had the patio relayed and provided a picnic bench). They are sort of looking after the lawn, but to be fair it was laid in September so they haven't really had the use/advantage of it yet.

    At anther property the tenants asked if they laid a lawn would I pay for it, which I did, especially after finding out how labour intensive it was at the other place (just the de-stoning took a full day!).
  • stphnsteveystphnstevey Forumite
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    MSE_Martin wrote: »
    Hi Alan

    Sorry you feel that way. By your argument though I should close the site down. Cheap credit cards hit those who work for card companies, cheap contact lenses opticians, cheap flights holidays.

    This is a consumer website, not an investor website, and always has been. I have written many times how people often play for both sides. There are many good investor sites which will give advice for landlords - its not something that I've ever written about or covered - its not what this site does.

    Tenants are consumers. Landlords may be consumers in other roles, but not in their landlord role. There are some great sites out there supporting landlords and I wish you and them the best - but its not what MoneySaving is about.

    It's also worth noting that in any deal the landlord has the ability to say no... and not accept a price they dont want to. There's no aim to steal, force, or do anything unethical hear just to ensure people are getting a good deal on their housing, as we aim to show them how to get a good deal on anything else.

    I've now answered your point, and won't comment again in this thread, as it needs to return to its original purpose and would ask that you don't discuss it within this thread.

    Kind regards

    Martin

    Martin

    Ever the politician - lots of words but not much content....

    You can't compare huge multinational credit card companies and large chains of high street opticians to simple buy to let landlords. Property portfolio's might be different in size, but the majority of landlords only have a few properties at most. Lot's of ordinary people have turned to renting as they can't sell in this climate and they would go under otherwise. The days when landlords had whellbarrows full of money are well and truly over. There has been a new breed of ordinary people that have been forced into renting or lose thousands of pounds and go into vast debt.

    What I object to is using a recession (that is effecting everyone, landlords and tenants alike) to stand on someone else to get ahead.

    You would never see a thread about 'push down builders prices as their is a recession and alot of them haven't got any work or have been made redundant - endorsed by Martin's Weekly email'.

    Why? He has a business too? Is he not the same as a credit card company or opticians? Why not?

    Because we don't like people taking advantage of the little guy who is suffering in this horrible recession too.

    However Martin believes landlords are different and there are no little guys out there, they are all Donald Trump...
  • Ever the politician - lots of words but not much content....

    You can't compare huge multinational credit card companies and large chains of high street opticians to simple buy to let landlords. Property portfolio's might be different in size, but the majority of landlords only have a few properties at most. Lot's of ordinary people have turned to renting as they can't sell in this climate and they would go under otherwise. The days when landlords had whellbarrows full of money are well and truly over. There has been a new breed of ordinary people that have been forced into renting or lose thousands of pounds and go into vast debt.

    What I object to is using a recession (that is effecting everyone, landlords and tenants alike) to stand on someone else to get ahead.

    You would never see a thread about 'push down builders prices as their is a recession and alot of them haven't got any work or have been made redundant - endorsed by Martin's Weekly email'.

    Why? He has a business too? Is he not the same as a credit card company or opticians? Why not?

    Because we don't like people taking advantage of the little guy who is suffering in this horrible recession too.

    However Martin believes landlords are different and there are no little guys out there, they are all Donald Trump...

    I think you would have a very good point IF we were paying a subscription to use this site, but we are not, it is a free site! (by the way I'm a LL too)
  • sdooleysdooley Forumite
    918 posts
    Property portfolio's might be different in size, but the majority of landlords only have a few properties at most.

    George Orwell in Road to Wigan Pier, surveying the Great (the last?) Depression noted that the Lowthers and other large landlords were, contrary to the opinion of liberal opinion in the South, not seen as the worst landlords by the people who lived in their houses. The worst were the pensioners who had two or three properties on which they relied for income because they could not afford any flexibility on rent if a job was lost and had no capacity to invest in the maintainance of their properties.

    If we are going into bad times now it will be better for many reasons to be the tenant of a large, professional, well-funded landlord than a hobby buy-to-letter.
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