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Great ‘How to haggle down rent’ Hunt

edited 30 November -1 at 1:00AM in House Buying, Renting & Selling
148 replies 71.3K views
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  • I have managed to haggle my rent down by £20 a mth when i moved in before the recession. However, this seems to have increased my problems! Rather than saving money i have been asked to move out as the landlord wants to get more money per month! Im tired of paying the fees that letting agents charge,and moving costs, this is the second time its happened now and i will be out of pocket again because i have a greedy landlord who wants to charge £800 a month for a two bed flat thats not worth that. What worries me is that i chose a letting agent because i wanted to feel more secure in a longterm let and the agents cant do anything to help. Also the prices in Bournemouth are going up not down! The landlords seem to charge whatever they want and people migrating here (my new neighbours) are quite happy to pay such high rent :(
  • I have managed to haggle my rent down by £20 a mth when i moved in before the recession. However, this seems to have increased my problems!
    Rather than saving money i have been asked to move out as the landlord wants to get more money per month! Im tired of paying the fees that letting agents charge,and moving costs, this is the second time its happened now and i will be out of pocket again because i have a greedy landlord who wants to charge £800 a month for a two bed flat thats not worth that. What worries me is that i chose a letting agent because i wanted to feel more secure in a longterm let and the agents cant do anything to help. Also the prices in Bournemouth are going up not down! The landlords seem to charge whatever they want and people migrating here (my new neighbours) are quite happy to pay such high rent :(
  • loveandlightloveandlight Forumite
    1.2K posts
    500 Posts
    ✭✭✭
    posted by Gingernutmeg
    look after the property, and generally landlords will be happier to look sensibly at the finances to keep a good tenant.
    I would have thought that keeping a 'good' tenant is one of the most moneysaving things a landlord can do?

    I agree and with an attitude like this, you can come and rent one of my properties any time.

    Keeping a good landlord is also one of the most moneysaving things a tenant can do! ;)
  • My tenancy was due for renewal 1st March so I approached my lovely LL a couple of weeks ago to confirm I wanted to stay if they were happy to keep me on.
    They did want to put the rent up by 100 pounds a month. I said I thought this was a little unfair as the properties they own either side of me were being let out at the original rent. They acknowledged that I had been a nice tenant, hadn't even had to contact them about anything so agreed to keep the rent the same. I did have to sign a tenancy for another year which I think is fair enough as we both seem perfectly happy with the sitiation.

    Without this site I honestly don't think I would have had the courage to challenge it but I know a lot more now than I used to so many thanks to everyone who posts advice and help here.
    Sadly, you don't have any badges yet but keep trying! See what you could get........... oh boo hoo I am crying into my wine. :D
  • I think agents have been referred to indirectly in this thread. If tenants want to rent property cheaper the biggest step they can take is probably to rent directly from a landlord than use an agent.

    I am sure some of the tenants on this thread will be able to furnish information on current charges levied by agents, but they will normally charge a fee every time a new lease is taken out. They will usually charge the tenants AND landlord. They will often allow no more than 6 month contracts as this maximises their revenue. They will charge maybe 10-15% or more commission on rent to the landlord, but are of NO USE if any problems of non-payment arise. They will say 'contact your solicitor'.

    You may have guessed I am a landlord, who lets directly. I do not charge tenants for their tenancy agreements or renewals, or for referencing. I keep my properties in good condition and react quickly to request for repairs etc and generally do not increase the rent for as long as the tenants stays in the property. My rents are invariably below the market level, as I want reliable, long term tenants.

    I have seldom had tenants haggle, but if they do, I reject them, knowing full well that the price I request is more than reasonable.
  • aless02aless02 Forumite
    5.1K posts
    LumpHammer wrote: »
    I think agents have been referred to indirectly in this thread. If tenants want to rent property cheaper the biggest step they can take is probably to rent directly from a landlord than use an agent.

    But if you find a property through an agent, you don't have much choice. If a tenant were to subvert the process & contact the landlord privately, that's actually illegal for the landlord then to rent to the tenant without paying the agency for 'finding' the tenant. Breach of contract.

    Agreed with everyone else - best way to reduce/keep rent from inflating is to simply be a good tenant!
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  • Hi
    I would recommend tenants haggle down their rent. I am just in the process of moving and because landlords are unable to rent their properties I have been able to negotiate a reduction of £50 a month on the asking rent. That's a fantastic £600 a year.
    Don't forget we are at the start of a recession/depression which will get worse before it gets better, so landlords have no choice if they want income from their properties. This trend is going to last for many years not months.
    I will negotiate down again next year if conditions warrant.
  • caroltcarolt Forumite
    8.5K posts
    If you are a tenant - remember, if you don't ask, you don't get.

    The landlord may say no - that's up to them - but you won't know if you don't ask.

    Generally, if you are in situ and a reliable tenant who looks after the property and pays the rent, a landlord would be foolish to refuse to leave your rent at current levels, as any landlord of any experience would know that void periods plus the risk of future less-reliable tenants are likely to be far more costly to him/her.

    Harder to renegotiate your existing rent downwards, unless you are paying over the odds. If so, as advised above, show examples from your area of equivalent places renting for less - and if your landlord ignores your request - move somewhere cheaper! His loss!

    When renting somewhere new - ask, based on analysis of asking rents, though bearing in mind that they are falling and that asking rent does not equal rent achieved at the moment.

    Good luck.
  • Mellymell wrote: »
    madkitty- offer to renegotiate your contract, look on rightmove etc to see prices for similar properties, use this as evidence. You may have to sign a fixed term contract to entice your landlord to drop the rent, after all point out to them that you are a relible tenant and they are guaranteed rent for the duration of the fixed term-and that's very important right now!!


    Agreed - this is exactly what we did one week ago (send say 6 links of similar properties on Rightmove) and within a few hours the landlord agreed to reduce our rent from this month onwards to ensure we'd stay put.

    This has saved us £540 over the coming 12 months (reduced by £45 per month).

    You don't ask, you don't get :o
    MFW #185
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  • rag31rag31 Forumite
    198 posts
    Well this is all making me feel a bit queasy I have to say :cool:

    We couldn't sell our house and moved into rented, and rented it out. The rent is already £50 below our mortgage so we are losing money, if the tenant insisted on lowering the rent then we'd have to say no! We can't afford to lose anything more on this house, and will have to have it repossessed as we are struggling desperately with money at the moment. We are not professional landlords, we didn't choose to do it, we had no choice and are in negative equity now.

    We are renting our own house from a good landlord, and i'm just praying they don't hike the rent and the tenant doesn't want to drop it or i'm afraid it's bankruptcy for us :-(

    Becky
    Mum of 4 lovely children
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