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Grrr - blue badge

edited 30 November -1 at 1:00AM in Disability Money Matters
518 replies 37.1K views
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  • black_pawblack_paw Forumite
    1.8K posts
    Part of the Furniture 1,000 Posts Photogenic Combo Breaker
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    very true!
    the truth is out there ... on these pages !!
    <3
  • rasen45rasen45 Forumite
    13 posts
    the blue badge scheme needs sorting out there are too
    claming a badge when they are bl--dy idle too walk
    i keep asking if they would like my wheels for there
    legs, come on brown sort it out.
    :T :T :eek:
    RASEN 45 :j :santa2:
  • pipkin71pipkin71 Forumite
    21.8K posts
    rasen45 wrote: »
    the blue badge scheme needs sorting out there are too
    claming a badge when they are bl--dy idle too walk
    i keep asking if they would like my wheels for there
    legs, come on brown sort it out.

    Do you know, I recently got round to applying for my blue badge and the amount of info they ask you to provide I wouldn't have thought it would be issued to those who were just too idle to walk.

    I had to send a copy of one of the following:

    *Utility bill *Rent book *Council Tax Bill

    I had to send a photocopy of two of the following:

    *Birth or adoption certificate *Medical card *Pink or new style driving licence *Passport.

    I also had to send a copy stating my DLA mobility award.

    That gives automatic entitlement.

    For those not automatically eligible, they are entitled to a blue badge if they are:

    *over two years of age and has a severe disability affecting both arms, drives regularly and cannot use or finds it hard to use parking meters

    *over two years of age and is unable to walk or has considerable difficulty walking due to a permanent and substantial disability.

    *a child under the age of two, who has a medical condition requiring bulky medical equipment or immediate access to avehicle for treatment.

    All of the above would require evidence, so offering too lazy to walk as evidence wouldn't cut it. As to whether those on HRM should be given a blue badge, again I doubt they would be in receipt of HRM because they were too idle to walk.
    There is something delicious about writing the first words of a story. You never quite know where they'll take you - Beatrix Potter
  • edited 10 April 2009 at 1:40PM
    savemoneysavemoney Forumite
    18.1K posts
    Part of the Furniture 10,000 Posts
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    edited 10 April 2009 at 1:40PM
    I went to B&Q other day, there are only 2 blue badge spaces next to door, 2 spaces out of about 80, both full

    I noticed a very large range rover with a big oldish guy sat at the wheel, no passengers. I couldn't see any blue badge, 20 minutes later came out guy still there, definitely no blue badge shown.

    Now he may be disabled or have passengers that are but why not show your badge. My disabled daughter with me had to walk other end of car park because she needs room to get out and cant get in/out of a normal space and I cant drop her off near store because she is very slow getting out and we would cause problems for other drivers get in/out of the store plus there is a pedestrian crossing at the doors
  • pipkin71 wrote: »
    Do you know, I recently got round to applying for my blue badge and the amount of info they ask you to provide I wouldn't have thought it would be issued to those who were just too idle to walk.

    I had to send a copy of one of the following:

    *Utility bill *Rent book *Council Tax Bill

    I had to send a photocopy of two of the following:

    *Birth or adoption certificate *Medical card *Pink or new style driving licence *Passport.

    I also had to send a copy stating my DLA mobility award.

    That gives automatic entitlement.

    For those not automatically eligible, they are entitled to a blue badge if they are:

    *over two years of age and has a severe disability affecting both arms, drives regularly and cannot use or finds it hard to use parking meters

    *over two years of age and is unable to walk or has considerable difficulty walking due to a permanent and substantial disability.

    *a child under the age of two, who has a medical condition requiring bulky medical equipment or immediate access to avehicle for treatment.

    All of the above would require evidence, so offering too lazy to walk as evidence wouldn't cut it. As to whether those on HRM should be given a blue badge, again I doubt they would be in receipt of HRM because they were too idle to walk.

    I don't think it's the disabled that abuse the system, it's usually others that are entitled to use the car on behalf of the disabled. I questioned a guy at our local asda, he had parked in a disabled bay, he raced across the car park with a young lad. The answer was he was shopping for his disabled mother so that entitled him to park in a disabled bay:confused:
    Also some councils give out BB to pensioners, no matter if they are disabled or not.
  • sleepymysleepymy Forumite
    6.1K posts
    rasen45 wrote: »
    the blue badge scheme needs sorting out there are too
    claming a badge when they are bl--dy idle too walk
    i keep asking if they would like my wheels for there
    legs, come on brown sort it out.

    How can you tell who is too idle and who is too ill to walk far?
    The stupid things you do, you regret... if you have any sense, and if you don't regret them, maybe you're stupid. - Katharine Hepburn
  • daskadaska Forumite
    6.2K posts
    I have a general rule of thumb that if the person gets from the car to the cashpoint before I'm even out of my seat I can feel reasonably confident they're abusing the system...
    Eat food. Not too much. Mostly plants - Michael Pollan
    48 down, 22 to go
    Low carb, low oxalate Primal + dairy
    From size 24 to 16 and now stuck...
  • sleepymysleepymy Forumite
    6.1K posts
    I'm sure people might have looked at me this week and assumed that I was abusing the blue badge system. What they wouldn't know by looking at me is that I had a brother lying in a vascular ward with a severed artery, due to domestic abuse from his partner. He almost died from blood loss at the scene and then again during surgery from a blood clot. As from last night I also have a 70yr old father lying in the cardiac unit of another hospital due to the shock. I've been running on stress adrenalin & meds all week. None of the people who might have judged me will see the kick back from this, because I won't be able to leave the house.

    I look at some people myself and wonder, it's only natural, but would never think of being so arrogant as to police the disabled bays. My circumstances may be exceptional atm but no one knows why a stranger seems able to move freely and, if it's a genuinely disabled/ill person, the last thing they may need is to be harranged by members of the public.

    A rude and abusive disabled person throwing dirty looks and snide comments at someone they deem able bodied is no less rude and abusive than an able bodied person who takes upon themselves to do it.
    The stupid things you do, you regret... if you have any sense, and if you don't regret them, maybe you're stupid. - Katharine Hepburn
  • edited 11 April 2009 at 5:00PM
    daskadaska Forumite
    6.2K posts
    edited 11 April 2009 at 5:00PM
    The guy that jumped out of the white van and ran to the cashpoint didn't have a blue badge, just some very toned muscles - I enjoyed watching them ripple under his lycra... You're correct, conditions can vary from day to day for many of us, but if your lack of mobility qualifies you for HRM then running like that just ain't an option! He looked like Linford Christie!

    I'm not a parking space warden. I very seldom challenge anyone at all - except the builder who nicked the only available space at Tesco the day before yesterday because I know him socially... He had the grace to be very embarassed and apologetic and I think making it 'personal' - knowing that he had taken a space and also knowing, without being reminded, that this would have caused me problems might well mean he doesn't do it again.
    Eat food. Not too much. Mostly plants - Michael Pollan
    48 down, 22 to go
    Low carb, low oxalate Primal + dairy
    From size 24 to 16 and now stuck...
  • sleepymysleepymy Forumite
    6.1K posts
    daska wrote: »
    The guy that jumped out of the white van and ran to the cashpoint didn't have a blue badge, just some very toned muscles - I enjoyed watching them ripple under his lycra... You're correct, conditions can vary from day to day for many of us, but if your lack of mobility qualifies you for HRM then running like that just ain't an option! He looked like Linford Christie!

    I'm not a parking space warden. I very seldom challenge anyone at all - except the builder who nicked the only available space at Tesco the day before yesterday because I know him socially... He had the grace to be very embarassed and apologetic and I think making it 'personal' - knowing that he had taken a space and also knowing, without being reminded, that this would have caused me problems might well mean he doesn't do it again.

    Sorry daska, I didn't mean to make that look like it was aimed at you :o. There are some obvious cases but some of the other comments on this thread make me cringe. I'm 37 and don't limp or hobble and don't always use my zimmer so am likely to be a target for the 'not disabled enough' opinions and honestly, if anyone had made a rude comment to me about parking this week they would have got a short shift, no matter their what physical ablilty/age/gender etc. It's hard enough to cope with disability/chronic illness without worrying if other disabled people are judging you too.

    There's no dignity in being rude to other drivers (even if they do seem to deserve it), it can just feed the 'angry disabled person' steriotype IMO and widens the divide that can be between able bodies and disabled people. Luckily this doesn't seem to be a big problem in NI, the only time I experienced it was on the mainland and I feel sorry for any genuinely disabled/ill person who feels abused/embarrassed by the public through ignorance.
    The stupid things you do, you regret... if you have any sense, and if you don't regret them, maybe you're stupid. - Katharine Hepburn
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