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  • FIRST POST
    • Chickabiddybex
    • By Chickabiddybex 8th Jan 18, 5:19 PM
    • 1,230Posts
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    Chickabiddybex
    Pocket Money
    • #1
    • 8th Jan 18, 5:19 PM
    Pocket Money 8th Jan 18 at 5:19 PM
    I read that the average pocket money for a 12-16 year old is £6.71 a week. [source]

    It seems to have gone up a bit since I was younger but not a huge amount. What shocked me is people give their kids money for doing chores such as cleaning up after a pet which I had to do for free!

    The other chores and amounts are:
    Cleaning the car: £2.54
    Mowing the lawn: £2.38
    Ironing: £2.19
    Sweeping the garden: £1.86
    Cleaning up after pets: £1.78

    How much pocket money do you give your kids? And how much did you get when you were a kid?

    Do you pay your kids for chores and if so how much?

    How do you pay your kids? (Cash or digitally)

    I was shocked to discover that kids these days often have pocket money cards and apps!
    You can read more about those on the original link above or here: https://www.moneysavingexpert.com/banking/cards-for-under-18s
    Last edited by Chickabiddybex; 10-01-2018 at 3:13 PM.
    Hi. I'm a Board Guide on the Gaming, Consumer Rights, Ebay and Praise/Vent boards. I volunteer to help get your forum questions answered and keep the forum running smoothly. Board guides are not moderators and don't read every post. If you spot an abusive or illegal post then please report it to forumteam@moneysavingexpert.com (it's not part of my role to deal with abuse). Any views are mine and not the official line of MoneySavingExpert.com
Page 1
    • Comms69
    • By Comms69 8th Jan 18, 5:25 PM
    • 1,776 Posts
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    Comms69
    • #2
    • 8th Jan 18, 5:25 PM
    • #2
    • 8th Jan 18, 5:25 PM
    Well paying kids for jobs is a good way to build a work ethic.


    The amounts seem low for some and high for others.
    • oystercatcher
    • By oystercatcher 8th Jan 18, 5:36 PM
    • 1,691 Posts
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    oystercatcher
    • #3
    • 8th Jan 18, 5:36 PM
    • #3
    • 8th Jan 18, 5:36 PM
    I found when I paid my children to do chores they wouldn't do anything unless it was paid.

    Then my eldest said " I think we should help Mum because we love her !" That worked much better. I gave them a set amount of pocket money because I loved them and they learned to budget .

    The amounts are irrelevant now as time has passed..... but when they were teens I gave them monthly pocket money by standing order so they learned to manage a bank account too.
    Last edited by oystercatcher; 10-01-2018 at 1:24 PM. Reason: silly typo muddling direct debit and standing order. I DO know the difference !
    • z1a
    • By z1a 8th Jan 18, 5:53 PM
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    z1a
    • #4
    • 8th Jan 18, 5:53 PM
    • #4
    • 8th Jan 18, 5:53 PM
    My 14 YO Son, doesn't get pocket money as such, but when he wants something he'll ask, and usually gets it, not very materialistic anyway, and very rarely asks for expensive stuff.
    • peachyprice
    • By peachyprice 8th Jan 18, 6:38 PM
    • 18,974 Posts
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    peachyprice
    • #5
    • 8th Jan 18, 6:38 PM
    • #5
    • 8th Jan 18, 6:38 PM
    I found when I paid my children to do chores they wouldn't do anything unless it was paid.

    Then my eldest said " I think we should help Mum because we love her !" That worked much better. I gave them a set amount of pocket money because I loved them and they learned to budget .

    The amounts are irrelevant now as time has passed..... but when they were teens I gave them monthly pocket money by direct debit so they learned to manage a bank account too.
    Originally posted by oystercatcher
    This is how I've always managed pocket money. Far more healthy than paying children to do 'chores' which I don't believe adds anything to achieving a work ethic.

    OP, my youngest is 16 and gets £50 every 4 weeks into her bank account with which she buys her own clothes, make up, theatre tickets etc., and we pay for her phone. She also has a job teaching swimming two evenings a week. Her work ethic is just fine, so are her budgeting skills.
    Accept your past without regret, handle your present with confidence and face your future without fear
    • Diamandis
    • By Diamandis 8th Jan 18, 8:32 PM
    • 132 Posts
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    Diamandis
    • #6
    • 8th Jan 18, 8:32 PM
    • #6
    • 8th Jan 18, 8:32 PM
    I'm disabled so my daughter does more for me than other kids do for their parents. She has a list of things to do and if everything is done she gets £10 per week, if she doesn't do all of it then she gets some money deducted from her £10.
    • kerri gt
    • By kerri gt 8th Jan 18, 8:56 PM
    • 6,745 Posts
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    kerri gt
    • #7
    • 8th Jan 18, 8:56 PM
    • #7
    • 8th Jan 18, 8:56 PM
    When I was younger I asked if I could do chores to earn some extra money above my pocket money. I was told in no uncertain terms that if I was asked to do something, I was expected to do it full stop as a member of the household, just like my parents who (as they pointed out) did not get paid to do the housework. They viewed paid chores as a form of bribery.

    I still grew up with a perfectly good work ethic and got a paper round as soon as I could at 14 and from then on always had an after school or weekend job.
    Feb 2015 NSD Challenge 8/12
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    • Kim_13
    • By Kim_13 8th Jan 18, 9:04 PM
    • 1,663 Posts
    • 1,904 Thanks
    Kim_13
    • #8
    • 8th Jan 18, 9:04 PM
    • #8
    • 8th Jan 18, 9:04 PM
    I got £20 a month, £10 until I was in secondary school.

    Everyone I know was either expected to do chores anyway or only got the occasional offer of say £5 to wash the car. No regular way to 'top up' pocket money without getting a job.
    Sealed Pot 11 #520 ~ /£100
    VSP 2018 #9 ~ £0/£180.00
    CCCC 2018 #1 ~ £8.00/£180.00

    I'm a Board Guide on the Savings and Investments , Budgeting and Bank Accounts , Credit Cards and Marriage, Relationships and Families boards which means I volunteer to help get your forum questions answered and keep the forum running smoothly. Please remember, board guides don't read every post. If you spot an illegal or inappropriate post then please report it to forumteam@moneysavingexpert.com (it's not part of my role to deal with this.) Any views are mine and not the official line of MoneySavingExpert.com
    • trailingspouse
    • By trailingspouse 8th Jan 18, 9:41 PM
    • 2,597 Posts
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    trailingspouse
    • #9
    • 8th Jan 18, 9:41 PM
    • #9
    • 8th Jan 18, 9:41 PM
    When my kids were little, there were certain things they were expected to do for nowt - mostly keeping their rooms clean and tidy, cleaning out the guinea pigs, and some washing up. There were other things we paid them to do - I always remember getting my daughter to clean the wheelie bin out for the princely sum of £5!!!

    I remember when I was about 12 or 13, and I was getting 30p a week pocket money (this was 1972). I felt that 30p wasn't enough, and started a conversation about the possibility of a pay increase. I'd hoped for 50p, but my Dad turned round and suggested an 'allowance' of £5 a month. Wow!! Not only was it more money than I could have imagined, but I was also the first of my friends to get an allowance rather than pocket money. Terribly grown up!!
    • Jojo the Tightfisted
    • By Jojo the Tightfisted 8th Jan 18, 9:55 PM
    • 23,517 Posts
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    Jojo the Tightfisted
    I asked for 25p a week if I did the washing up (I would have been 8 or 9 and that was enough for a bag of pick 'n' mix that I could have a couple from each day - the other kids at school got £1-2, but I thought that was far too much to ask if money was as tight as I was always being told it was).

    It was refused and from then, I had to do chores because if I was old enough to ask for money, I was old enough to do them. Vacuuming, washing up, collecting up dirty washing, pretreating it, sorting & putting it in the machine (not switching it on, for some reason), taking it out, hanging it out, bringing it back in, ironing and folding, polishing the shoes, feeding the animals, cleaning them out, giving them their medicines - plus I cleaned the cooker, sides and cupboard doors/floor whilst I was doing the washing up because I preferred a clean place.

    My big brother started sneaking me money each week after hearing the first conversation (he gave me double what I'd asked for) and regularly increased it until he was giving me £5/wk plus taking me to the cinema once a month and buying me magazines and things like books and records every week until I got a job - and then he only stopped because I told him he didn't have to do it anymore.


    I felt insulted that my effort wasn't good enough to be paid for when it was apparently good enough to make me do it, but my big brother earned my eternal gratitude for deciding to pay me anyway, whatever she said.


    I'd think that £15 would be a comparable pocket money rate now - about 2.5 hours work for the low paid under 18.
    I could dream to wide extremes, I could do or die: I could yawn and be withdrawn and watch the world go by.

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    Originally posted by colinw
    • AndyBSG
    • By AndyBSG 9th Jan 18, 10:01 AM
    • 945 Posts
    • 1,171 Thanks
    AndyBSG
    Just out of interest, what age do parents start giving kids pocket money?

    My two are both too young at the moment to even understand the concept of money and I have no idea when to expect them to be wanting their own money!
    • NineDeuce
    • By NineDeuce 9th Jan 18, 12:07 PM
    • 676 Posts
    • 591 Thanks
    NineDeuce
    By 12 years old, kids should have some kind of work ethic. If by 12 they still have the attitude that they will only do chores for money and not out of respect and kindness, then you have pretty much failed as a parent on that aspect.
    • Comms69
    • By Comms69 9th Jan 18, 12:14 PM
    • 1,776 Posts
    • 1,610 Thanks
    Comms69
    By 12 years old, kids should have some kind of work ethic. If by 12 they still have the attitude that they will only do chores for money and not out of respect and kindness, then you have pretty much failed as a parent on that aspect.
    Originally posted by NineDeuce


    Personally I don't work for free, I don't expect my kids to either.
    • NineDeuce
    • By NineDeuce 9th Jan 18, 12:34 PM
    • 676 Posts
    • 591 Thanks
    NineDeuce
    Personally I don't work for free, I don't expect my kids to either.
    Originally posted by Comms69
    Really? Do you pay yourself to do your own ironing and washing up then?

    Terrible example.
    • Comms69
    • By Comms69 9th Jan 18, 12:37 PM
    • 1,776 Posts
    • 1,610 Thanks
    Comms69
    Really? Do you pay yourself to do your own ironing and washing up then?

    Terrible example.
    Originally posted by NineDeuce


    No I pay the kids....


    Unfortunately I cant send them up the chimney's these days.....
    • HelenNoreen
    • By HelenNoreen 9th Jan 18, 12:47 PM
    • 1 Posts
    • 1 Thanks
    HelenNoreen
    Although I don't think this actually encourages him to read, as he loves books anyway, I give my 6 year son 50p each time he reads (we try and read a few pages each day)
    • NineDeuce
    • By NineDeuce 9th Jan 18, 1:07 PM
    • 676 Posts
    • 591 Thanks
    NineDeuce
    No I pay the kids....


    Unfortunately I cant send them up the chimney's these days.....
    Originally posted by Comms69
    I havent even got a chimney so you wont get me on that one. But I will get my daughter to do the washing up now and again as a favour, rather than as an employee....
    • dsab
    • By dsab 9th Jan 18, 1:08 PM
    • 295 Posts
    • 154 Thanks
    dsab
    We have 2 daughters (6&8), and the younger one gets £2 a week and the older one £3 a week. They can spend it as they see fit, but so far they have mostly saved it. Interestingly since they get pocket money they have decided that certain things they previously asked for are now just too expensive to waste their money on, like trading cards, small collectible figures, nom nom's etc. They value things very differently now. So that has certainly been a win in my opinion.

    In exchange for the pocket money they have to do their homework on time, clean their rooms, set the dinner table and fill and empty the dish washer.
    • peachyprice
    • By peachyprice 9th Jan 18, 1:46 PM
    • 18,974 Posts
    • 43,817 Thanks
    peachyprice
    Personally I don't work for free, I don't expect my kids to either.
    Originally posted by Comms69
    Who pays you to run your household?
    Accept your past without regret, handle your present with confidence and face your future without fear
    • kerri gt
    • By kerri gt 9th Jan 18, 2:11 PM
    • 6,745 Posts
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    kerri gt
    Personally I don't work for free, I don't expect my kids to either.
    Originally posted by Comms69
    Its not about working for free, it's about being a contributing member of the household in which they are part of. No one pays me to do the ironing, hoover, scrub the toilet etc.

    Just out of interest, what age do parents start giving kids pocket money?

    My two are both too young at the moment to even understand the concept of money and I have no idea when to expect them to be wanting their own money!
    Originally posted by AndyBSG
    I started getting pocket money at the age of 5 when I started school. Back then I could either afford a packet of stickers or some sweets. My dad would take me each week to the newsagent and let me choose which I wanted, on occasion he would buy me the item I couldn't afford (with a 'shhhh' don't tell mum) but that was always a treat and I never asked / expected it.
    Feb 2015 NSD Challenge 8/12
    JAN NSD 11/16


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