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  • FIRST POST
    • Rovato1
    • By Rovato1 5th Jun 16, 5:23 PM
    • 3Posts
    • 0Thanks
    Rovato1
    Barclaycard Lifetime Ban
    • #1
    • 5th Jun 16, 5:23 PM
    Barclaycard Lifetime Ban 5th Jun 16 at 5:23 PM
    Hello

    I held a Barclaycard which defaulted over seven years ago and the outstanding amount was 411.

    This is now disappeared from my Credit File and I have applied for a new card after been notified I had a 95% chance of been accepted for a new card.

    Barclaycard have just advised they hold onto past information even thou my credit file is in very good standing, the Applications Manager advised if you have ever defaulted in the past should it be 20 years ago you will never get another credit card.

    In a nutshell, ever default with a Barclays Credit Card you then get a lifetime ban !

    Has anyone heard of this as it was news to me.

    Regards
    Brian
Page 1
    • zx81
    • By zx81 5th Jun 16, 5:24 PM
    • 20,579 Posts
    • 21,999 Thanks
    zx81
    • #2
    • 5th Jun 16, 5:24 PM
    • #2
    • 5th Jun 16, 5:24 PM
    Amex operate a similar policy.
    • Rovato1
    • By Rovato1 5th Jun 16, 5:38 PM
    • 3 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    Rovato1
    • #3
    • 5th Jun 16, 5:38 PM
    • #3
    • 5th Jun 16, 5:38 PM
    I wonder if there is a list of card companies that do this instead of wasting time applying. I was always under the impression if you had a clean credit file then it was alright, but have found out the hard away.
    • supersaver2
    • By supersaver2 5th Jun 16, 5:43 PM
    • 878 Posts
    • 2,443 Thanks
    supersaver2
    • #4
    • 5th Jun 16, 5:43 PM
    • #4
    • 5th Jun 16, 5:43 PM
    You can't really blame them and 7 years isn't that long ago. They are a business and they've lost money on you before so no wonder they refused you! I'm not sure I'd have had the cheek to apply, if you've a good score can't you apply elsewhere?
    • lynz68
    • By lynz68 5th Jun 16, 5:47 PM
    • 317 Posts
    • 305 Thanks
    lynz68
    • #5
    • 5th Jun 16, 5:47 PM
    • #5
    • 5th Jun 16, 5:47 PM
    I defaulted with Barclaycard probably about 12 yrs ago now had no problem getting a new one 3 yrs ago.
    • vinny_vimto
    • By vinny_vimto 5th Jun 16, 6:01 PM
    • 64 Posts
    • 6 Thanks
    vinny_vimto
    • #6
    • 5th Jun 16, 6:01 PM
    • #6
    • 5th Jun 16, 6:01 PM
    I defaulted on a Barclaycard credit card a couple of thousand and HSBC credit card 10 years ago and I was able to get a Barclaycard platinum card with balance transfer 0% about 3 years ago so what you've been told is total guff.

    HSBC they won't give me anything at all though so think they may ban for life
    Last edited by vinny_vimto; 05-06-2016 at 6:04 PM.
    • sjbrun
    • By sjbrun 5th Jun 16, 6:04 PM
    • 441 Posts
    • 443 Thanks
    sjbrun
    • #7
    • 5th Jun 16, 6:04 PM
    • #7
    • 5th Jun 16, 6:04 PM
    Can you offer to pay the 411 you owe to see if that will allow them to issue you a new card
    • GingerBob
    • By GingerBob 5th Jun 16, 6:52 PM
    • 3,613 Posts
    • 1,657 Thanks
    GingerBob
    • #8
    • 5th Jun 16, 6:52 PM
    • #8
    • 5th Jun 16, 6:52 PM
    Keeping electronic information about you indefinitely is probably incompatible with data protection legislation. I'm guessing Barclaycard are in breach this. However, the ICO, being a bunch of bumbling fools, will like as not be no use, though you could try reporting the matter to them to see what they say.
    • A4445
    • By A4445 5th Jun 16, 6:58 PM
    • 899 Posts
    • 422 Thanks
    A4445
    • #9
    • 5th Jun 16, 6:58 PM
    • #9
    • 5th Jun 16, 6:58 PM
    I defaulted on a Barclycard and was accepted for another card 6years later. Seems a bit hit and miss TBH
    • Ben8282
    • By Ben8282 5th Jun 16, 7:37 PM
    • 2,558 Posts
    • 1,188 Thanks
    Ben8282
    A friend of mine defaulted on Barclaycard about 20 years ago but for several years now has held Barclays current account and a Barclaycard.
    • agrinnall
    • By agrinnall 5th Jun 16, 7:56 PM
    • 21,971 Posts
    • 17,940 Thanks
    agrinnall
    Keeping electronic information about you indefinitely is probably incompatible with data protection legislation. I'm guessing Barclaycard are in breach this. However, the ICO, being a bunch of bumbling fools, will like as not be no use, though you could try reporting the matter to them to see what they say.
    Originally posted by GingerBob
    Perhaps you should read up on Principle 5. Here's a link for you.

    https://ico.org.uk/for-organisations/guide-to-data-protection/principle-5-retention/
    • HappyMJ
    • By HappyMJ 5th Jun 16, 8:03 PM
    • 20,595 Posts
    • 17,201 Thanks
    HappyMJ
    Hello

    I held a Barclaycard which defaulted over seven years ago and the outstanding amount was 411.

    This is now disappeared from my Credit File and I have applied for a new card after been notified I had a 95% chance of been accepted for a new card.

    Barclaycard have just advised they hold onto past information even thou my credit file is in very good standing, the Applications Manager advised if you have ever defaulted in the past should it be 20 years ago you will never get another credit card.

    In a nutshell, ever default with a Barclays Credit Card you then get a lifetime ban !

    Has anyone heard of this as it was news to me.

    Regards
    Brian
    Originally posted by Rovato1
    I wouldn't lend you money if you still owed me 411.

    You still owe the money. They can't take action against you in court but if you die they do have a claim on your estate if you have anything to leave.

    If you want the amount to be written off you need to declare yourself bankrupt or take out a DRO. The account will then be closed and in 6 years you can apply to them again.

    Regular savers earn 6% interest (HSBC, First Direct, M&S) Loans cost 2.9% per year (Nationwide) = FREE money.
    • GingerBob
    • By GingerBob 5th Jun 16, 8:26 PM
    • 3,613 Posts
    • 1,657 Thanks
    GingerBob
    Perhaps you should read up on Principle 5. Here's a link for you.

    https://ico.org.uk/for-organisations/guide-to-data-protection/principle-5-retention/
    Originally posted by agrinnall

    Thanks, but I'm already familiar with it. As you can see, what Barclays are doing is - as I first said - probably incompatible with DP legislation. However, those ƒeckless chumps at the ICO have couched all the data principles in terms that are ambiguous in the extreme and open to just about any sort of interpretation, hence the use of the word probably.


    Essentially what Barclays are doing here is blacklisting someone for life. If it ever went to court I'm sure this would not stand up.
    Last edited by GingerBob; 05-06-2016 at 8:31 PM.
    • BlondBoy
    • By BlondBoy 5th Jun 16, 8:53 PM
    • 161 Posts
    • 114 Thanks
    BlondBoy
    Essentially what Barclays are doing here is blacklisting someone for life. If it ever went to court I'm sure this would not stand up.
    Do you really think a judge would say 'Barclays are acting unlawfully in not extending a credit facility to someone who defaulted on a payment and still has an amount outstanding, although the default is historical'?
    • GingerBob
    • By GingerBob 5th Jun 16, 9:00 PM
    • 3,613 Posts
    • 1,657 Thanks
    GingerBob
    Do you really think a judge would say 'Barclays are acting unlawfully in not extending a credit facility to someone who defaulted on a payment and still has an amount outstanding, although the default is historical'?
    Originally posted by BlondBoy

    You may be right, given the outstanding debt. However it would be statue barred. The potential "unlawfulness" is about data retention, or more to the point, basing a business decision on data that's prehistoric, not about the refusal to offer a credit facility. Extend the time period to say, 50 years, and see how that looks.
    • BlondBoy
    • By BlondBoy 5th Jun 16, 9:09 PM
    • 161 Posts
    • 114 Thanks
    BlondBoy
    You may be right, given the outstanding debt. However it would be statue barred. The potential "unlawfulness" is about data retention, or more to the point, basing a business decision on data that's prehistoric, not about the refusal to offer a credit facility. Extend the time period to say, 50 years, and see how that looks.
    Originally posted by GingerBob
    Take your point, but it's purely a business decision really. Some businesses will take a view that, on an assessment of risk, a customer may be worth another go. Others may take the view that 'fool me once, shame on you, fool me twice....' Both are fair enough commercial decisions, I think.

    As mentioned upthread, Amex have a similar policy. I believe First Direct does too. Default on an account and that's it. Never again. So I'd argue that it's completely reasonable to store that data for 50 years, as it's the only way to be able to make that decision stick.

    It may be that, in terms of Data Protection legislation,, they may only store name, date of birth and known addresses at the time the business relationship ended. Account conduct etc may be destroyed after x number of years. But it's perfectly reasonable for any business to build and hold a 'stop list' for as long as they like, surely?
    • A4445
    • By A4445 5th Jun 16, 9:20 PM
    • 899 Posts
    • 422 Thanks
    A4445
    It's odd that I defaulted and was given a second chance? Mine was written off in bankruptcy so the account on credit file was settled with Zero balance not sure if that makes any difference. I would completely understand if they didn't want to give me another account. I was 100% expecting the application to be declined.
    • jonesMUFCforever
    • By jonesMUFCforever 5th Jun 16, 9:59 PM
    • 25,556 Posts
    • 12,772 Thanks
    jonesMUFCforever
    You may be right, given the outstanding debt. However it would be statue barred. The potential "unlawfulness" is about data retention, or more to the point, basing a business decision on data that's prehistoric, not about the refusal to offer a credit facility. Extend the time period to say, 50 years, and see how that looks.
    Originally posted by GingerBob
    What does 'statute barred' mean to you?
    It only means in this case that Barclaycard cannot go to court to enforce judgement against the defaulter.
    The debt seems to be still outstanding (ie not sold on and on etc) so IMO they are quite justified in keeping internal records to show accurate records.
    What goes around - comes around
    give lots and you will always receive lots
    • GingerBob
    • By GingerBob 5th Jun 16, 10:11 PM
    • 3,613 Posts
    • 1,657 Thanks
    GingerBob
    What does 'statute barred' mean to you?
    It only means in this case that Barclaycard cannot go to court to enforce judgement against the defaulter.
    The debt seems to be still outstanding (ie not sold on and on etc) so IMO they are quite justified in keeping internal records to show accurate records.
    Originally posted by jonesMUFCforever

    Missing the point. The OP offered this quote; " the Applications Manager advised if you have ever defaulted in the past should it be 20 years ago you will never get another credit card."


    Now the applications manager doesn't elaborate, but it seems there's a good chance that Barclays keeps a shlt list of anyone who's ever defaulted, and that could mean the debt was eventually settled (granted, not the case with the OP -apparently) but the name remains blacklisted, simply because of a default at some point, even if payment was eventually made.


    My point is not about the debt, settled or otherwise, it's about retention of data for an inordinate amount of time.
    • BlondBoy
    • By BlondBoy 5th Jun 16, 10:43 PM
    • 161 Posts
    • 114 Thanks
    BlondBoy
    My point is not about the debt, settled or otherwise, it's about retention of data for an inordinate amount of time.
    GingerBob, is your issue with the company having a blacklist full stop?

    Self-evidently, you can't have a blacklist without storing data.... (which is a perfectly acceptable reason under the data protection principles, so long as only data relevant to the management of the blacklist is stored).
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