Preparing for spring!

We moved to our home in August and while we had done a fair amount of DIY and gardening work (including some repair of the poor lawn!), we cannot wait for the spring to start working in the garden!

Thanks to the PictureThis app, we were able to identify a number of plants in our back garden so we know how to care for them (and also whether they are a weed or not!). However there is one we struggle to work out...



The app identifies this as a Mediterranean mallow but we are not convinced plus we haven't seen any flowers.
«1

Comments

  • Brie
    Brie Posts: 9,211
    Photogenic First Post Name Dropper First Anniversary
    Forumite
    Can't help with the ID but the general advice for people moving to where there is an established garden is to leave things for a year so you can see the full 4 seasons.  After that you know better what changes are required.  

    Obviously doesn't stop you from planting a lot of spring bulbs, things in pots, sorting out the veg plot.
    "Never retract, never explain, never apologise; get things done and let them howl.”
  • ArbitraryRandom
    ArbitraryRandom Posts: 2,328
    First Anniversary First Post Homepage Hero Name Dropper
    Forumite
    At first glance, the leaves look mallow-like to me?
    I'm not an early bird or a night owl; I’m some form of permanently exhausted pigeon.
  • twopenny
    twopenny Posts: 5,290
    Name Dropper First Post First Anniversary Photogenic
    Forumite
    How exciting!
    The mature leaves are too long and pointed and the growth shape doesn't seem right for a mallow.
    Just looked at a couple of books but it's late.

    You could try a google photo match and see what comes up.

    The leaves have a hairy sheen which says from a hot country. They start rounded and grow pointed.
    My first thought was Seakale but they're wrong for that.
    I'll have another go tomorrow. I like a puzzle.

    Are they individual plants or branches of the one?

    The only normal people you know are the ones you don’t know very well

  • moneysaver1978
    moneysaver1978 Posts: 320
    First Anniversary First Post Name Dropper
    Forumite
    Thank you all! Good call about leaving a garden alone for a full season! Although sadly, one side of the fence came down so we are using the opportunity to revamp the garden with a raised bed (and replanting some of the existing plants).

    It's a single plant with several branches - photos below (it does remind me too much of that thing in The Stranger Things! Haha!):



    Either way, excited for the "green" adventure (after spending so many years in an apartment in the city) and even have a spreadsheet already for the plants identified!




  • twopenny
    twopenny Posts: 5,290
    Name Dropper First Post First Anniversary Photogenic
    Forumite
    edited 22 January at 5:04PM
    I can help with the English lavender.
    Really worth it's space in a garden. When gathered you can make your own lavender water for spray, laundry, moths in wardrobe or carpets or to cook with.

    prune - snip back only as far as 2 or 3 clusters of leaves. Never brown wood.

    If not regularly pruned autumn and spring (a pleasant job) it will go woody.
    Cuttings can be a small twig pulled off from a ripe branch and it should have a heel.
    Press into soil somewhere. A half dozen or so. Autumn.
    Or you can try them in pots. 2 or 3 each.

    You can dig it up and bury it deeper in the soil. It will then make new roots from the burried branches.
    A smattering of bonemeal helps but they don't like much.

    You've got 'diseased'. What disease is that.
    They are pretty tough. I've never had a problem with English lavender.
    Photo?

    The only normal people you know are the ones you don’t know very well

  • Katiehound
    Katiehound Posts: 7,495
    Name Dropper First Anniversary Combo Breaker First Post
    Forumite
    Foxgloves are biennial so if they flowered last year that's it! (Except you can prune lower down the stem and they may grow again)  You should have seedlings growing already for this year- they are generally prolific.

    Lavender- you can prune the new growth in the autumn and then push the  pieces into a pot- preferably near the edges of a clay pot. With luck they will root over winter. This is the same for many evergreen shrubs. No need for a heel- just patience! You can try this with the sage , Mexican orange (Choisya ) & the hebe. 

    Laurel can grow into a thug- make sure you keep it pruned to the size you want!

    Willow herbs are considered as weeds. They tend to be prolific as the seeds float off in the wind.
    Being polite and pleasant doesn't cost anything!
    If you found my posting helpful please hit the "Thanks" button!
    Many thanks
    -Stash busting: 337 in 2022
    Stash busting: in 2023. 120 doggy duvets, 24 shopping bags, 43 dog coats, 2 scrunchies, 10 mittens, 6 bootees, 8 glass cases, 2 A6 notebooks, 59 cards, 6 lavender bags,36 crochet angels,9 woven bones, 1 crochet knee blanket, 1 lined bag,3 owls, 88 pyramid pouches = total 420...£119.50 spent- £114.50 earned= total spend £5. Total earned for 'Dogs for Good' £546.82

    2024:23 Doggy duvets, 15 pyramid pouches, 6 hot water bottle covers, 4 knitted beanies, 1 crochet angel= 42 £61 spent!!! already
  • moneysaver1978
    moneysaver1978 Posts: 320
    First Anniversary First Post Name Dropper
    Forumite
    Thank you both!  Photos of the lavenders:

    Tipped Lavender:



    "Woody" English Lavender:

    I am planning to remove the plants, fix the fence behind, build a raised bed, and then replant so if the lavender is gone, no point in replanting. Maybe!
  • Katiehound
    Katiehound Posts: 7,495
    Name Dropper First Anniversary Combo Breaker First Post
    Forumite
    edited 24 January at 11:08AM
    Lavender just needs a trim- cut off the newer growth but certainly don't go into the woody stems- that's a 'no go' Personally I would cut the woody one so that the stems are all about the same height as the lower tips.- I think that would be about level with base piece of panel. Just neaten off.
    Being polite and pleasant doesn't cost anything!
    If you found my posting helpful please hit the "Thanks" button!
    Many thanks
    -Stash busting: 337 in 2022
    Stash busting: in 2023. 120 doggy duvets, 24 shopping bags, 43 dog coats, 2 scrunchies, 10 mittens, 6 bootees, 8 glass cases, 2 A6 notebooks, 59 cards, 6 lavender bags,36 crochet angels,9 woven bones, 1 crochet knee blanket, 1 lined bag,3 owls, 88 pyramid pouches = total 420...£119.50 spent- £114.50 earned= total spend £5. Total earned for 'Dogs for Good' £546.82

    2024:23 Doggy duvets, 15 pyramid pouches, 6 hot water bottle covers, 4 knitted beanies, 1 crochet angel= 42 £61 spent!!! already
  • moneysaver1978
    moneysaver1978 Posts: 320
    First Anniversary First Post Name Dropper
    Forumite
    Lavender just needs a trim- cut off the newer growth but certainly don't go into the woody stems- that's a 'no go' Personally I would cut the woody one so that the stems are all about the same height as the lower tips.- I think that would be about level with base piece of panel. Just neaten off.
    Thank you! The question with the big lavender - the whole thing is full of woody stems so I am unsure where to trim. :blush:
Meet your Ambassadors

Categories

  • All Categories
  • 341.4K Banking & Borrowing
  • 249.6K Reduce Debt & Boost Income
  • 449K Spending & Discounts
  • 233.7K Work, Benefits & Business
  • 605.5K Mortgages, Homes & Bills
  • 172.3K Life & Family
  • 246.5K Travel & Transport
  • 1.5M Hobbies & Leisure
  • 15.8K Discuss & Feedback
  • 15.1K Coronavirus Support Boards