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Pulled Offer Post Survey

24

Comments

  • tacticalbanjo
    tacticalbanjo Posts: 90 Forumite
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    Can you give an example of what the actual defects are? Because according to RICS you get a category 3 defect for electrics just for not having a recent EICR which most residential sellers won't have. RICS surveyors often look at things with butt covering in mind so the detail matters.
  • Keep_pedalling
    Keep_pedalling Posts: 16,587 Forumite
    First Anniversary First Post Name Dropper Photogenic
    We have just had 3 Electrics, heating and hot water, on a 6 year old house. I dread to think how many our 1930s house will throw up.
  • Albermarle
    Albermarle Posts: 22,026 Forumite
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    user1977 said:
    As above category 3 is not necessarily something which an agent would require to disclose, and it would be pointless for an EA to pass on the vague info they have from you, if you're not willing to elaborate on what the problems actually are.
    That seems bizarre.

    If you were buying a used car and the salesman knew of several critical issues, as the original owner of the vehicle told the salesman the engine is knackered, the suspension is about to fall apart and the sub-frame shows signs of failure but still sold it as immaculate to you as the buyer you'd be a bit !!!!!!, no?
    But the EA does not know of any actual critical issues, as they ( or we ) have not got any actual details. Just saying that a surveyor highlighted an unspecified issue with 'main walls' tells you very little.
  • Emily_Joy
    Emily_Joy Posts: 1,230 Forumite
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    There are quite a number of threads where the survey goes along the lines "I am assigning level 3 risk to multifuel burner because I haven't seen a HETAS certificate".  The fact that the surveyor has not seen a HETAS certificate is not an issue a EA should be concerned with. 
  • sheramber
    sheramber Posts: 19,047 Forumite
    First Anniversary I've been Money Tipped! First Post Name Dropper
    buy you haven't elaborated on the problems the survey indicates.  

    one comment on my survey was for uneven slabs in the back garden. Hardly a gamechanger.

    A new buyer will get his own survey and make a decision based on that.  

    Any body viewing houses soon gets to know  not to trust 'agent speak' 

    If it worries you so much then give the estate agent full details of what the survey highlighted.
     so he can pass the information to the seller and any  buyer.


  • propertyrental
    propertyrental Posts: 2,491 Forumite
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    edited 16 January at 7:00PM
    I too have a generally low opinion of EAs, but not in this case.

    Offering to sell the survey at half price is just cheeky - and pointless. Why would the EA or seller want it?

    If you were a serious buyer you should share the survey's full details of the relevant areas with the seller aand renegotiate price. If you genuinely were put off by the survey, then walk away and get on with your life.

    BTW, as others have said: electrics, heating, gas are almost always listed as category 3 since the surveyor is not qualified to inspect/report on these. So he is saying: " I can't inspect /comment on the electricity (whatever) so as a matter of urgency (category 3) you should get them inspected by a qualified electrician".

    That is a long way from saying "there is an urgent problem with the electrics".

    The other issues may or may not be urgent but as you've chosen not to share them here (or with the EA/seller) you can't really expect sensible advice or feedback.
  • TheJP
    TheJP Posts: 1,665 Forumite
    First Anniversary First Post Name Dropper
    On the face of this post you sound a little bitter that the owners (not the EA) will remarket the house at the same price and not pay you half for your survey. Have you had a discussion with your surveyor about the items listed? As others say many may not seem that serious.

    The EA or owner didn't commission the report nor do they have to declare it just because you say so. The house could be falling apart but it is up to the buyer to carry out their own diligence. 
  • Cloth_of_Gold
    Cloth_of_Gold Posts: 847 Forumite
    First Anniversary First Post Name Dropper Combo Breaker
    A 200 year old property described as an 'immaculate example' isn't in my mind about the condition, I would expect that to relate to how it looks, it's layout, and setting.

    Being 200 years old I would expect to be taking on a building that need ongoing TLC. A level 3 survey is usually only visual, non intrusive, and won't test electrics, gas or water, leaving lots of category 3 outcomes, recommending further investigation.

    That's what I thought.
  • housebuyer143
    housebuyer143 Posts: 3,316 Forumite
    First Anniversary First Post Name Dropper
    Without more information the most the agent has to say if asked is that you pulled out because you didn't like what the survey brought up. They can't know what it did or didn't because you won't tell them.
    They can't just vaguely say " there could be something wrong with every aspect of the house, or it might be fine" as that would be silly. 
  • bobster2
    bobster2 Posts: 506 Forumite
    First Anniversary First Post Name Dropper
    user1977 said:
    As above category 3 is not necessarily something which an agent would require to disclose, and it would be pointless for an EA to pass on the vague info they have from you, if you're not willing to elaborate on what the problems actually are.
    That seems bizarre.

    If you were buying a used car and the salesman knew of several critical issues, as the original owner of the vehicle told the salesman the engine is knackered, the suspension is about to fall apart and the sub-frame shows signs of failure but still sold it as immaculate to you as the buyer you'd be a bit !!!!!!, no?
    Yes but you're not the original owner.

    For the analogy to hold - you're buying a used car and someone previously visited the showroom, had a look at the car and told the salesman they weren't going to buy it because of various faults. But they wouldn't tell the salesman what the faults were. And now you expect the salesman to modify their marketing materials based on this previous (non)buyer's comments.
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