Planning Objection to Chicken Agricultural Building for 14,000 Hens

scaredofdebt
scaredofdebt Posts: 1,637
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Apologies if this is not the right part of the forum, please advise if so and I will move this.

I received a letter today from the council about a planning application for an agricultural building (80 metres by 20 metres) to be built around 400 metres from our house to house 14,000 chickens for egg production.  The current site is pasture and the area around us is all pasture and residential buildings, our house has fields on two sides and houses on the others.

One of the neighbouring houses is within 100 metres of the proposed building.

On what grounds can I object to this?

It's green field site and the only access goes right past our house, within 10 metres of the building, it's a small farm track that currently only takes traffic for 3 houses, ie cars and the odd delivery van.  It is used in July by tractors for harvesting.  The application mentions around a dozen 16 metre articulated HGVs a week, which is going to be noisy compared to what we have now.

I'm also concerned about the smell and potential pollution caused by so many animals, the application mentions a 7.5 tonne HGV coming every fortnight to remove the dead birds.

I have read about complaints involving the smell from people living similar distances away from such facilities, so obviously a bit concerned about it.

My other concern is there's a large tree on our boundary hedge that might have branches hit by a HGV and in the past when they have fallen we've had them dumped into our garden causing damage to the fence.  The hedge is maintained by one of the local farmers, we don't own it.

Any advice welcome.



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  • FreeBear
    FreeBear Posts: 14,262
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    scaredofdebt said: On what grounds can I object to this?
    Smell, noise, traffic, risk of disease (Avian flu) - You need to keep your objections factual and remove any emotion from your arguments.

    In one of my previous jobs, I used to do work for some of the large chicken & turkey producers around here. When driving to their sites, I knew I was getting within a mile by the smell. On a hot summer day, the stench could be overpowering.


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  • Brie
    Brie Posts: 9,305
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    I've seen this from the other way around in that there was an objection to a "chicken house" that had been in situ for decades and then house built around it.  They had no idea what they were buying.  Noise and SMELL!  Frankly I was on the side of the chicken house as it was there first.  They still managed to close it down.  

    But yes also the increase in heavy vehicles going by your house is a good point to raise as well. 
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  • Thanks all so far.

    What I don't understand is why he is trying to build this where he is, some 400 metres away from the village and barely 100 metres from near-neighbours.

    He has quite a lot of land and could move it further away by another 500 metres or so, it's almost like he's trying to annoy the neighbours.

    I will bear this feedback in mind when I write my objection letter thanks again.

    I've also found this which may be relevant in some cases:

    https://secure.broadland.gov.uk/MVM.DMS/Planning Application/757000/757282/20201399 2020_10_07 Public Comment_The Orchards_Beighton.pdf
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  • TELLIT01
    TELLIT01 Posts: 16,256
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    There is an application in my area to build several hundred houses adjacent to a large poultry farm.  Many objections have been raised due to the potential smell issues.  That's obviously the opposite of what the OP is concerned about, but the problem is the same.  In part of the report I read the developers seemed to be trying to dismiss the issue by saying that the smell would only be a problem for about 20% of the year!!  Typical developer mentality.
  • FreeBear said:
    scaredofdebt said: On what grounds can I object to this?
    Smell, noise, traffic, risk of disease (Avian flu) - You need to keep your objections factual and remove any emotion from your arguments.

    In one of my previous jobs, I used to do work for some of the large chicken & turkey producers around here. When driving to their sites, I knew I was getting within a mile by the smell. On a hot summer day, the stench could be overpowering.


    You can smell them a mile away?  Fantastic.

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  • Eldi_Dos
    Eldi_Dos Posts: 1,534
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    Apologies if this is not the right part of the forum, please advise if so and I will move this.

    I received a letter today from the council about a planning application for an agricultural building (80 metres by 20 metres) to be built around 400 metres from our house to house 12,000 chickens for egg production.  The current site is pasture and the area around us is all pasture and residential buildings, our house has fields on two sides and houses on the others.

    One of the neighbouring houses is within 100 metres of the proposed building.

    On what grounds can I object to this?





         Hate to be a merchant of doom but can only report on what I have witnessed.

         In the industry I was in it was observed more than once that cable faults caused by rats chewing on cables was             more noticeable near these facilities. We all thought it was caused by the spillage of feedstuff coming off lorries 
         as they drove towards their delivery point. I also noticed that derelict buildings alongside the railway line that ran           parallel to the road where roosts for hundreds of pigeons feeding on the spill.

         The planning application may only concern the actual site but I would be pushing that deliveries operate a system         so that spills cannot happen, and if that cannot be guaranteed the application be denied.
  • Section62
    Section62 Posts: 7,513
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    He has quite a lot of land and could move it further away by another 500 metres or so, it's almost like he's trying to annoy the neighbours.

    I will bear this feedback in mind when I write my objection letter thanks again.
    This kind of livestock unit will need running water and an electricity supply, along with relatively straightforward road access.  The decision to site the building in any given location is probably driven as much by the cost of providing these as trying to annoy anyone.  The further the building is from civilisation, the more expensive it is to lay on services to it.

    The modern approach to poultry production has moved on a fair amount in recent years.  Disease precautions mean having buildings that are far closer to being hermetically sealed than maybe 20 or 30 years ago.  The aim, in effect, is to keep anything out of the building which could potentially carry disease.

    So if the building can be desigend to keep disease out, then it should be capable of being designed to keep smells contained.  This is the area where the planning system could have the most impact - i.e. a requirement that the forced ventilation system(s) of the facility are only exhausted via approptiate filtration and odour control to minimise the impacts of dust and smell.

    The angle I'd take if this was proposed on my doorstep would be that (i.e. mitigation of the impacts), in preference to what is probably a poor chance of getting it stopped altogether.

    There are other mitigations to consider... for example how/where waste will be stored, hours of vehicle use, a curfew on deliveries/collections by lorry (etc)
  • twopenny
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    Time of deliveries needs to be set in stone!
    I lived next to a school for many years no problem. Then it started taking deliveries of food stuff at 3 in the morning. Bad enough. But he must have stopped for tea because the van left again 30min to an hour later. I'm a heavy sleeper but couldn't beat this.

    I think looking at the road situation and researching could be a good move. Access is often the key.

    We have buildings built on farm land. A lot of them up for sale again quickly because of the muck spreading twice a year affecting living.

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  • twopenny said:
    Time of deliveries needs to be set in stone!
    I lived next to a school for many years no problem. Then it started taking deliveries of food stuff at 3 in the morning. Bad enough. But he must have stopped for tea because the van left again 30min to an hour later. I'm a heavy sleeper but couldn't beat this.

    I think looking at the road situation and researching could be a good move. Access is often the key.

    We have buildings built on farm land. A lot of them up for sale again quickly because of the muck spreading twice a year affecting living.

    Thanks.

    Delivery times, will bear that in mind.

    Yes we have muck spreading here but it's only a couple of times a year and the farms were here before the houses so you accept it.

    The road is private and joins onto a trunk road, that junction is potentially dangerous for articulated lorries to join so I will look at that aspect, thanks.
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  • Section62
    Section62 Posts: 7,513
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    twopenny said:
    Time of deliveries needs to be set in stone!
    I lived next to a school for many years no problem. Then it started taking deliveries of food stuff at 3 in the morning. Bad enough. But he must have stopped for tea because the van left again 30min to an hour later. I'm a heavy sleeper but couldn't beat this.

    I think looking at the road situation and researching could be a good move. Access is often the key.

    We have buildings built on farm land. A lot of them up for sale again quickly because of the muck spreading twice a year affecting living.

    ...
    The road is private and joins onto a trunk road, that junction is potentially dangerous for articulated lorries to join so I will look at that aspect, thanks.
    The planning authority will consult the highway authority regarding the access and the impact this may have on the (trunk) road.  They may require a transport impact assessment as part of the application.

    However, 12 lorries per week is roughly two per day.  It is unlikely the highway authority will have a great deal of concern over that level of additional traffic.  All junctions are "potentially dangerous". Arguably slow moving agricultural vehicles using the junction pose a greater risk then road-going lorries, so development that has the potential to replace agricultural traffic with lorries may have a positive effect on road safety.

    As this is a relatively weak ground of objection you may be better off forgetting about that, so you don't dilute the key points you want to make. (if the HA say it isn't a problem then your objection won't count for anything)
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