ONE DAY LEFT to add your questions before the Forum 'Ask An Expert: Energy' event ends. Our expert MSE Andrew will answer some from Wed afternoon

Shed ideas

Hi
I really need a shed in my small garden. Needs to accommodate a regular petrol mower with foldable handle plus a few garden power tools, chainsaw, hand tools etc.
The base is already there, just needs levelling. I worked out that 7x5ft would be a good size shed. Double doors on this one would be good for the mower.
https://www.buyshedsdirect.co.uk/7-x-5-forest-overlap-pressure-treated-shed-double-door-apex-wooden-shed
The shed could fit in facing forward or across. The earth to the left in the picture will be lawn eventually. Just wondering if there’s particular things to look for when choosing sheds. I think wood is better than a plastic type like Keter.
Any help appreciated.






«13

Comments

  • FreeBear
    FreeBear Forumite Posts: 12,888
    Eighth Anniversary 10,000 Posts Name Dropper Photogenic
    Forumite
    Doesn't look to bad for the price - I'd suggest not having a window though..
    I have one that has plastic windows. Didn't take long for them to discolour, and one got knocked slightly and is now broken. I'd also recommend nailing some 25x50 battens around the edges of the roof panels so that you have something to fix the felt to.
    Her courage will change the world.

    Treasure the moments that you have. Savour them for as long as you can for they will never come back again.
  • Brie
    Brie Forumite Posts: 7,424
    Part of the Furniture 1,000 Posts Photogenic Name Dropper
    Forumite
    We have one like this that fits a lawnmower and quite a few tools:

    Forest 4Life 6 x 4 Pent Wooden Shed | Buy Sheds Direct

    Thing to remember with anything like this is whatever size you buy you're likely to fill it up, possibly with junk or otherwise things that don't need to be kept.  So go as small as you can.  And I like the single door - no problem getting our fairly standard size mower in and out.  

    Whatever size you go for - how will that fit on the slabs?  Presumably the slabs will extend beyond the space the shed takes.  So you can have your door(s) opening on to slabs and not into the flower bed or mud or the lawn.  

    My first thought was to have it backing onto the neighbour's wees/brambles but of course then they will simply grow around the shed and wondered if you have it backing on to the fence you could still reach the brambles to cut back etc as needed.  Obviously you'll want to paint the fence before you erect anything & ensure the shed is well stained particularly on the back as you won't be able to access that in coming years.

    What direction does it normally rain?  If the rain normally comes from one particular direction then positioning the shed so that it's back is more to the weather will better protect the contents from rain being driven in around the door.  

    And wood, I think, looks nicer, more natural, even if painted an extraordinary colour.  Anything plastic seems to fade over the years and there's no option (that I'm aware of) to paint it to look fresher.
    "Never retract, never explain, never apologise; get things done and let them howl.”

    2023 £1 a day  £553.26/365
  • danrv
    danrv Forumite Posts: 1,258
    Fifth Anniversary 1,000 Posts Name Dropper
    Forumite
    edited 2 August at 5:07PM
    Brie said:
    We have one like this that fits a lawnmower and quite a few tools:

    Forest 4Life 6 x 4 Pent Wooden Shed | Buy Sheds Direct

    Thing to remember with anything like this is whatever size you buy you're likely to fill it up, possibly with junk or otherwise things that don't need to be kept.  So go as small as you can.  And I like the single door - no problem getting our fairly standard size mower in and out.  

    Whatever size you go for - how will that fit on the slabs?  Presumably the slabs will extend beyond the space the shed takes.  So you can have your door(s) opening on to slabs and not into the flower bed or mud or the lawn.  

    My first thought was to have it backing onto the neighbour's wees/brambles but of course then they will simply grow around the shed and wondered if you have it backing on to the fence you could still reach the brambles to cut back etc as needed.  Obviously you'll want to paint the fence before you erect anything & ensure the shed is well stained particularly on the back as you won't be able to access that in coming years.

    What direction does it normally rain?  If the rain normally comes from one particular direction then positioning the shed so that it's back is more to the weather will better protect the contents from rain being driven in around the door.  

    And wood, I think, looks nicer, more natural, even if painted an extraordinary colour.  Anything plastic seems to fade over the years and there's no option (that I'm aware of) to paint it to look fresher.
    Thanks. 
    Was expecting that to read ‘go as big as you can’. I could fill the shed up four times over but would like compact. 
    For fitting on the slabs, I’m assuming the shed rests on say, six further slabs on top of the base.

    The orientation, either way I’d like to be able to reach the brambles to both cut and get the nice crop of blackberries each year.
    It’s a row of en bloc garages with an overgrown area behind.
    The 7x5ft shed allows enough space, more so I think with the shed facing forward.
    Not sure about the rain. Currently it’s slightly towards the fence.
  • Brie
    Brie Forumite Posts: 7,424
    Part of the Furniture 1,000 Posts Photogenic Name Dropper
    Forumite
    danrv said:
     
    Was expecting that to read ‘go as big as you can’. I could fill the shed up four times over but would like compact. 
    Well I'm taking the idea of a woman's handbag....no matter the size it's always full.  And a small bag can hold all the essentials as well as a big one.  So the smaller you go the less junk you're lugging about!!!

    The fact that you (or most women (& possibly men)) have enough to fill the shed (bag) 4 times over doesn't mean you should.

    Other thing - don't get anything with a window.  It's just an option for a leak.  My opinion obviously.
    "Never retract, never explain, never apologise; get things done and let them howl.”

    2023 £1 a day  £553.26/365
  • twopenny
    twopenny Forumite Posts: 4,571
    Part of the Furniture 1,000 Posts Name Dropper Photogenic
    Forumite
    I got on alright with a window but it was just another thing to clean.

    The one I inherited had peg board nailed across the uprights and was wonderful for hanging garden tools from hand or electrical.
    Made it great for fetching, putting away and cleaning out.
    Only thing that didn't hang was the mower.

    The only normal people you know are the ones you don’t know very well

  • Brie
    Brie Forumite Posts: 7,424
    Part of the Furniture 1,000 Posts Photogenic Name Dropper
    Forumite
    Completely agree about having a peg board or some good alternative with large sturdy hooks for hanging stuff.  If nothing else it means the mice can run around underneath unimpeded.   :D
    "Never retract, never explain, never apologise; get things done and let them howl.”

    2023 £1 a day  £553.26/365
  • Ganga
    Ganga Forumite Posts: 3,736
    Part of the Furniture 1,000 Posts Name Dropper
    Forumite
    Might i throw a spanner among the recommendations you have received, buy the biggest that you can fit on the base as any shed fills up straight away and then you have to climb over things to get stuff at the back.
    Also nothing wrong with a plastic shed ,i have a one ,cleaning is done with a yard broom and some water ,no need to paint/treat it every year ,people will say easily broken into but so is a wooden one and mine ( a Ketter ) has a roof light fitted and a window to supply lighting ,the roof light is done by perspex strips in the apex so it looks like they are illuminated when daylight hits the roof ALSO no roofing felt to worry about.
    ITS NOT EASY TO GET EVERYTHING WRONG ,I HAVE TO WORK HARD TO DO IT!
  • danrv
    danrv Forumite Posts: 1,258
    Fifth Anniversary 1,000 Posts Name Dropper
    Forumite
    edited 2 August at 6:43PM
    Ganga said:
    Also nothing wrong with a plastic shed 
    Quite like the idea.
    Just thinking about ease of hanging tools, adding a peg rail etc. Also ventilation, being plastic. 

  • bluelad1927
    bluelad1927 Forumite Posts: 110
    100 Posts Second Anniversary Name Dropper
    Forumite
    danrv said:
    Ganga said:
    Also nothing wrong with a plastic shed 
    Quite like the idea.
    Just thinking about ease of hanging tools, adding a peg rail etc. Also ventilation, being plastic. 

    I've always had good wooden sheds but opted for a similarly priced branded plastic shed this time and it is garbage in comparison.

    I wont make the same mistake again
  • Alnat1
    Alnat1 Forumite Posts: 2,816
    1,000 Posts First Anniversary Name Dropper
    Forumite
    If it were me, I'd move the slabs and put the shed in front of the unsightly garage. Grow something pretty in the corner where the slabs are now. You'd be able to pick the berries and keep the brambles trimmed.

    How about an 8x3 with a double door on the long front? Nice long back to hang tools, mower sits at one end, put a shelf over it for storing little stuff. With a square shed you need to leave room through the middle to get the stuff at the back, a waste of space. Long thin shed and everything is within easy reach, more usable capacity.
    Barnsley, South Yorkshire
    Solar PV 5.25kWp SW facing (14 x 375 Longi) Lux 3.6kw hybrid inverter and 4.8kw Pylontech battery storage installed March 22
    Octopus Agile/Fixed Outgoing and Tracker gas
Meet your Ambassadors

Categories

  • All Categories
  • 338.8K Banking & Borrowing
  • 248.6K Reduce Debt & Boost Income
  • 447.6K Spending & Discounts
  • 230.7K Work, Benefits & Business
  • 600.8K Mortgages, Homes & Bills
  • 171K Life & Family
  • 244K Travel & Transport
  • 1.5M Hobbies & Leisure
  • 15.9K Discuss & Feedback
  • 15.1K Coronavirus Support Boards