Compensation claim for a journey that wasn't delayed but involved a change of train

Options
124»

Comments

  • Tietam
    Tietam Posts: 18 Forumite
    First Anniversary First Post
    Options
    The OP has not explained whether his journey continued by rail beyond Glasgow. If it did and his arrival at his eventual destination was later than planned, if the LNER service had not been curtailed, then indeed there is a claim against LNER in accordance with Delay Repay Rules. I can only see one LNER service which commonly runs from Kings Cross to Glasgow as described, namely the 15.30 departure, due at Glasgow Central at 21.26. If for example the OP had been intending to catch the 21.34 service to Kilmarnock, due there at 22.27, but because of being rerouted via Queen Street, he missed it and instead caught the 22.13 service arriving at 22.51, his journey would have been delayed by 24 minutes. A "journey" can be covered by more than one ticket, and it is the entire journey which is to be considered in deciding whether there has been a delay.

    Thank you for this. Can you confirm that other posters suggesting that it is only the LNER part of the journey that counts are incorrect? I'm surprised more people aren't aware of the fact that it is the full journey. 
  • jbuchanangb
    jbuchanangb Posts: 1,330 Forumite
    First Anniversary First Post Name Dropper
    Options
    I can confirm that Delay Repay is not limited to one part of a multi-leg journey covered by more than one ticket. "Split-ticketing" is a well known and permitted practice in rail travel, and it is well established that when a "journey" is delayed, the Train Operating Company whose delay or cancellation caused the delay is responsible for any delay repay compensation. In this case, if the rail journey ended at Glasgow, the time of arrival at Glasgow Queen Street should be used and compared with the time due at Glasgow Central. If the journey continued by rail to some other destination, using another ticket, then the combined cost of all tickets used, and the amount of delay at the eventual destination station, are the factors in determining whether delay repay is payable, along with whether the delay was long enough to qualify for LNER's DR policy. It has not been mentioned in this thread whether this journey did continue by rail from Glasgow or not.
  • Tietam
    Tietam Posts: 18 Forumite
    First Anniversary First Post
    Options
    I can confirm that Delay Repay is not limited to one part of a multi-leg journey covered by more than one ticket. "Split-ticketing" is a well known and permitted practice in rail travel, and it is well established that when a "journey" is delayed, the Train Operating Company whose delay or cancellation caused the delay is responsible for any delay repay compensation. In this case, if the rail journey ended at Glasgow, the time of arrival at Glasgow Queen Street should be used and compared with the time due at Glasgow Central. If the journey continued by rail to some other destination, using another ticket, then the combined cost of all tickets used, and the amount of delay at the eventual destination station, are the factors in determining whether delay repay is payable, along with whether the delay was long enough to qualify for LNER's DR policy. It has not been mentioned in this thread whether this journey did continue by rail from Glasgow or not.

    Thank you for this. 

    My journey continued by rail to another stop in Glasgow. 

    Is it a case of:

    Working out the time of train that I would have got from Glasgow Central had the train terminated there on time

    Working out the time of the train that I ended up getting, having had to walk from Glasgow Queen Street

    The difference between the two?
  • KeithP
    KeithP Posts: 37,975 Forumite
    Name Dropper First Post First Anniversary
    Options
    The delay is calculated as the difference in time that you were due to arrive at "another stop in Glasgow" compared with the time that you actually did arrive at that station.

    It really is that simple.
  • Tietam
    Tietam Posts: 18 Forumite
    First Anniversary First Post
    Options
    KeithP said:
    The delay is calculated as the difference in time that you were due to arrive at "another stop in Glasgow" compared with the time that you actually did arrive at that station.

    It really is that simple.

    It's remarkable how so few people know this - me included!
  • yorkie2
    yorkie2 Posts: 1,595 Forumite
    Name Dropper First Anniversary First Post
    Options
    Were you on time into your final destination (which I don't think you have specified)? If the answer is yes, you have no claim.

    Can you state what ticket(s) were held, and also can you detail your intended itinerary vs the actual times?

    If you arrived into Queen St at the time you were due into Central, then it is unlikely you would have a valid claim; the onward train from Central would be at least 15 minutes (and potentially rather more) later than that; the distance between the stations is short (a 5 minute walk or a free bus which doesn't take long).

    For Delay Repay to be claimable from LNER the delay into your final ticketed destination would need to be 30 minutes, or more.

    There is insufficient information in this thread to give a conclusive answer; if you can post the above information on Railforums fare advice or disputes forums, you can get a definitive answer.
  • Tietam
    Tietam Posts: 18 Forumite
    First Anniversary First Post
    Options
    yorkie2 said:
    Were you on time into your final destination (which I don't think you have specified)? If the answer is yes, you have no claim.

    Can you state what ticket(s) were held, and also can you detail your intended itinerary vs the actual times?

    If you arrived into Queen St at the time you were due into Central, then it is unlikely you would have a valid claim; the onward train from Central would be at least 15 minutes (and potentially rather more) later than that; the distance between the stations is short (a 5 minute walk or a free bus which doesn't take long).

    For Delay Repay to be claimable from LNER the delay into your final ticketed destination would need to be 30 minutes, or more.

    There is insufficient information in this thread to give a conclusive answer; if you can post the above information on Railforums fare advice or disputes forums, you can get a definitive answer.

    What would happen in the event that no trains to that destination were running, and another form of transport had to be used?
  • onashoestring
    onashoestring Posts: 1,631 Forumite
    First Anniversary First Post Name Dropper Combo Breaker
    Options
    Tietam said:
    yorkie2 said:
    Were you on time into your final destination (which I don't think you have specified)? If the answer is yes, you have no claim.

    Can you state what ticket(s) were held, and also can you detail your intended itinerary vs the actual times?

    If you arrived into Queen St at the time you were due into Central, then it is unlikely you would have a valid claim; the onward train from Central would be at least 15 minutes (and potentially rather more) later than that; the distance between the stations is short (a 5 minute walk or a free bus which doesn't take long).

    For Delay Repay to be claimable from LNER the delay into your final ticketed destination would need to be 30 minutes, or more.

    There is insufficient information in this thread to give a conclusive answer; if you can post the above information on Railforums fare advice or disputes forums, you can get a definitive answer.

    What would happen in the event that no trains to that destination were running, and another form of transport had to be used?
    The train company would be responsible for getting you to the destination-they will arrange alternative onward transport.  Usually it’s a replacement bus service . In some cases they may arrange a taxi .

    If there was no staff to help and you incurred  reasonable costs for your own onward travel, you may be able to claim back reasonable additional expenses to your final destination.

    The Train Company will consider these claims on a case-by-case basis. Write directly to the Train Company on which you were delayed to claim back reasonable costs for onward travel. You will need to also submit your receipt for the alternative transport  . 

    More information at https://www.nationalrail.co.uk/ Passenger rights and refunds 

  • Tietam
    Tietam Posts: 18 Forumite
    First Anniversary First Post
    Options
    Tietam said:
    yorkie2 said:
    Were you on time into your final destination (which I don't think you have specified)? If the answer is yes, you have no claim.

    Can you state what ticket(s) were held, and also can you detail your intended itinerary vs the actual times?

    If you arrived into Queen St at the time you were due into Central, then it is unlikely you would have a valid claim; the onward train from Central would be at least 15 minutes (and potentially rather more) later than that; the distance between the stations is short (a 5 minute walk or a free bus which doesn't take long).

    For Delay Repay to be claimable from LNER the delay into your final ticketed destination would need to be 30 minutes, or more.

    There is insufficient information in this thread to give a conclusive answer; if you can post the above information on Railforums fare advice or disputes forums, you can get a definitive answer.

    What would happen in the event that no trains to that destination were running, and another form of transport had to be used?
    The train company would be responsible for getting you to the destination-they will arrange alternative onward transport.  Usually it’s a replacement bus service . In some cases they may arrange a taxi .

    If there was no staff to help and you incurred  reasonable costs for your own onward travel, you may be able to claim back reasonable additional expenses to your final destination.

    The Train Company will consider these claims on a case-by-case basis. Write directly to the Train Company on which you were delayed to claim back reasonable costs for onward travel. You will need to also submit your receipt for the alternative transport  . 

    More information at https://www.nationalrail.co.uk/ Passenger rights and refunds 


    I'm thinking what would happen if the train that you would have got was not available, so you had to travel by bus instead?
  • fuzzything
    fuzzything Posts: 117 Forumite
    First Anniversary Name Dropper First Post Combo Breaker
    Options
    It’s case by case basis for costs other than train tickets. See item 21 in the national rail link in the response you’ve quoted.
Meet your Ambassadors

Categories

  • All Categories
  • 343.8K Banking & Borrowing
  • 250.3K Reduce Debt & Boost Income
  • 450K Spending & Discounts
  • 235.9K Work, Benefits & Business
  • 609K Mortgages, Homes & Bills
  • 173.4K Life & Family
  • 248.5K Travel & Transport
  • 1.5M Hobbies & Leisure
  • 15.9K Discuss & Feedback
  • 15.1K Coronavirus Support Boards