PLEASE READ BEFORE POSTING

Hello Forumites! However well-intentioned, for the safety of other users we ask that you refrain from seeking or offering medical advice. This includes recommendations for medicines, procedures or over-the-counter remedies. Posts or threads found to be in breach of this rule will be removed.
We'd like to remind Forumites to please avoid political debate on the Forum. This is to keep it a safe and useful space for MoneySaving discussions. Threads that are - or become - political in nature may be removed in line with the Forum’s rules. Thank you for your understanding.

Anyone planning ahead?

Options
245678

Comments

  • Broomstick
    Broomstick Posts: 1,648 Forumite
    Name Dropper First Anniversary Combo Breaker First Post
    Options
    I experimented with making two lots of rolled up newspaper pages to the width of an internal door, duct taped each roll then linked them together in a couple of places with duct tape measured to the depth of the door.  I then slid the duct tape under the door so that each roll was held in place.  It has worked beautifully and the door can be opened and shut easily but the rolls stay in place.  It obviously won't work with an external door where the outside newspaper would get wet but indoors is brilliant and costs next to nothing.  Looks a bit like this old one https://www.lakeland.co.uk/25017/under-door-draught-excluder.
  • Gin_and_Milk
    Gin_and_Milk Posts: 399 Forumite
    First Anniversary Name Dropper First Post
    Options
    I experimented with making two lots of rolled up newspaper pages to the width of an internal door, duct taped each roll then linked them together in a couple of places with duct tape measured to the depth of the door.  I then slid the duct tape under the door so that each roll was held in place.  It has worked beautifully and the door can be opened and shut easily but the rolls stay in place.  It obviously won't work with an external door where the outside newspaper would get wet but indoors is brilliant and costs next to nothing.  Looks a bit like this old one https://www.lakeland.co.uk/25017/under-door-draught-excluder.
    Just looked at the link you posted, and it's been discontinued.  I bet you anything they'll be available and selling like hot cakes soon!
  • theoretica
    theoretica Posts: 12,371 Forumite
    First Post Name Dropper Photogenic First Anniversary
    Options
    Thanks for your replies, much appreciated.
    My feet feel the cold too, especially when I'm working in the study.  That was an extension which was built before we bought the house, and it's obvious they didn't bother with any sort of insulation.
    My feet get cold when I sit still - I find ankle warmers really help.  I also have an electric foot warmer - at 60/30W it uses much less energy than warming the whole room.  But when I remember to put ankle warmers on before my feet get chilly I find I don't use the foot warmer much.

    But a banker, engaged at enormous expense,
    Had the whole of their cash in his care.
    Lewis Carroll
  • Gin_and_Milk
    Gin_and_Milk Posts: 399 Forumite
    First Anniversary Name Dropper First Post
    Options
    Thanks for your replies, much appreciated.
    My feet feel the cold too, especially when I'm working in the study.  That was an extension which was built before we bought the house, and it's obvious they didn't bother with any sort of insulation.
    My feet get cold when I sit still - I find ankle warmers really help.  I also have an electric foot warmer - at 60/30W it uses much less energy than warming the whole room.  But when I remember to put ankle warmers on before my feet get chilly I find I don't use the foot warmer much.

    Ooh, I haven't heard of those, will definitely check those out. Thank you!
  • weenancyinAmerica
    Options
    In the old castle days, they put tapestries on the walls mainly to keep out the drafts. You can also hang up pretty quilts on the walls where the cold comes through the uninsulated walls or even the padded blankets used to cover mirrors and furniture when moving. Several layers of rugs are better than just one layer for keeping the cold that might be coming up from underneath. Switching to heavier curtains or adding two or three layers to the curtains helps too. 
  • theoretica
    theoretica Posts: 12,371 Forumite
    First Post Name Dropper Photogenic First Anniversary
    Options
    Thanks for your replies, much appreciated.
    My feet feel the cold too, especially when I'm working in the study.  That was an extension which was built before we bought the house, and it's obvious they didn't bother with any sort of insulation.
    My feet get cold when I sit still - I find ankle warmers really help.  I also have an electric foot warmer - at 60/30W it uses much less energy than warming the whole room.  But when I remember to put ankle warmers on before my feet get chilly I find I don't use the foot warmer much.

    Ooh, I haven't heard of those, will definitely check those out. Thank you!
    Mine is a pad a bit like this, not a fabric one I would take shoes off to use.

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Electric-Heating-Handmade-Footswitch-Indicator/dp/B08H8X8N1J

    But a banker, engaged at enormous expense,
    Had the whole of their cash in his care.
    Lewis Carroll
  • OrkneyStar
    OrkneyStar Posts: 7,025 Forumite
    Name Dropper First Post First Anniversary Combo Breaker
    Options
    Some thoughts.....

    A while back I made draught excluders out of old thick tights (the thick wool/cotton ones) which didn't fit me well/didn't stay up well anymore. I stuffed them with old clothes which were past anyone being able to wear them (cut up) - they lasted a good few years but might well make some more soon.

    I also own lots of knitted socks, wrist warmers, leg warmers, mostly home made, so will use those again in winter. We also have a good few fleece blankets (mostly gifted by my mum) but they are great for layering up with. I also have lots of vests, which I wear as an extra layer in the cold.

    I do sometimes use a hot water bottle but that will be limited this coming year, with the price of electricity.

    I have also taken to using my steamer pot set more these days, the item in the bottom boils in the water, and the two sets above steam - potatoes tend to get the bottom, then cauli or carrots, then broccoli or something else that needs less cooking. This uses less electricity - the potatoes cook as fast, and the other veg cook in their steam instead of their own pot. Some of you might well do this already.

    We also had a non-cook dinner tonight (yummy salad, meat, cheese, fruit platters we made up) but I wouldn't like to do that every day - today we had a chippy lunch, which was very filling, so we decided to eat light tonight. I guess my point is that you can save money eating non-cooked meals, but for most people this is more a summer thing or if they have eaten hot food elsewhere recently. 


    Ermutigung wirkt immer besser als Verurteilung.
    Encouragement always works better than judgement.

  • Floss
    Floss Posts: 8,372 Forumite
    Name Dropper First Post First Anniversary Photogenic
    Options
    Thanks for your replies, much appreciated.
    My feet feel the cold too, especially when I'm working in the study.  That was an extension which was built before we bought the house, and it's obvious they didn't bother with any sort of insulation.
    Keep your feet off the floor by making a pad of newspapers wrapped in a piece of fabric - it will be a layer of insulation.

    My previous house had a single brick layer, no insulation kitchen which was bloomin' freezing - I put an oil-filled radiator with a thermostat on it to keep it not-frozen in winter, and was considering putting internal bi-fold doors on but I sold it & relocated instead!
    2021 Decluttering Awards: ⭐⭐🥇🥇🥇🥇🥇🥇 2022 Decluttering Awards: 🥇
    2023 Decluttering Awards: 🥇 🏅🏅🥇
    2024 Decluttering Awards: 🥇
  • annieb64
    annieb64 Posts: 629 Forumite
    First Anniversary First Post Name Dropper
    Options
    In the days when people had brick or stone floors in their kitchens women would often have a small rug to stand on in front of the sink. My grandma once gave me a half finished one along with one of Grandad's old cut throat razors which she used to cut the rug wool.
  • Gin_and_Milk
    Gin_and_Milk Posts: 399 Forumite
    First Anniversary Name Dropper First Post
    Options
    Floss said:
    Thanks for your replies, much appreciated.
    My feet feel the cold too, especially when I'm working in the study.  That was an extension which was built before we bought the house, and it's obvious they didn't bother with any sort of insulation.
    Keep your feet off the floor by making a pad of newspapers wrapped in a piece of fabric - it will be a layer of insulation.

    My previous house had a single brick layer, no insulation kitchen which was bloomin' freezing - I put an oil-filled radiator with a thermostat on it to keep it not-frozen in winter, and was considering putting internal bi-fold doors on but I sold it & relocated instead!
    Sounds very similar to ours.  Our kitchen is so cold in winter that if I leave something out overnight to defrost, it will still be rock solid.  It is literally warmer in the fridge!
Meet your Ambassadors

Categories

  • All Categories
  • 12 Election 2024: The MSE Leaders' Debate
  • 344.2K Banking & Borrowing
  • 250.4K Reduce Debt & Boost Income
  • 450.1K Spending & Discounts
  • 236.3K Work, Benefits & Business
  • 609.7K Mortgages, Homes & Bills
  • 173.5K Life & Family
  • 248.9K Travel & Transport
  • 1.5M Hobbies & Leisure
  • 15.9K Discuss & Feedback
  • 15.1K Coronavirus Support Boards