Student tv licence?

Hi,
My daughter started University this month. She has a room on campus. Obviously, she has her own laptop, and she may from time to time watch something like Strictly Come Dancing :) ! , but mostly it is for working on and SIMS etc I'd imagine.....
I can't get my head straight on whether I have to pay for a licence in full for her as well as the one we have for our house (where she will be for 22 weeks of the year).
Seems harsh.
Is it something I need to do or can it be avoided?
Thanks!
Duncan


Comments

  • pphillips
    pphillips Posts: 1,631 Forumite
    First Anniversary First Post Name Dropper
    It can be avoided if she only watches live TV/ BBC iPlayer using her laptop's internal battery.
    If she plans to do this while the laptop is connected to mains power, she'll need her own TV licence.
  • Chino
    Chino Posts: 2,029 Forumite
    First Anniversary Name Dropper First Post
    edited 6 October 2020 at 4:35PM
    pphillips said:
    It can be avoided if she only watches live TV/ BBC iPlayer using her laptop's internal battery.
    If she plans to do this while the laptop is connected to mains power, she'll need her own TV licence.
    According to the TV Licensing website a TV licence is required if a laptop is used to watch TV / BBC iPlayer if the laptop is ever powered from the mains. A laptop that can be powered temporarily from its battery whilst being powered from the mains at other times does not meet the requirement to have "TV receiving equipment that is powered solely by its own internal batteries".

  • pphillips
    pphillips Posts: 1,631 Forumite
    First Anniversary First Post Name Dropper
    Chino said:
    pphillips said:
    It can be avoided if she only watches live TV/ BBC iPlayer using her laptop's internal battery.
    If she plans to do this while the laptop is connected to mains power, she'll need her own TV licence.
    According to the TV Licensing website a TV licence is required if a laptop is used to watch TV / BBC iPlayer if the laptop is ever powered from the mains. A laptop that can be powered temporarily from its battery whilst being powered from the mains at other times does not meet the requirement to have "TV receiving equipment that is powered solely by its own internal batteries".

    I think you're talking nonsense,  of course you can recharge your laptop battery without a TV license as long as your not watching and charging simultaneously.
  • pphillips
    pphillips Posts: 1,631 Forumite
    First Anniversary First Post Name Dropper
    Mickey666 said:
    Chino said:
    pphillips said:
    It can be avoided if she only watches live TV/ BBC iPlayer using her laptop's internal battery.
    If she plans to do this while the laptop is connected to mains power, she'll need her own TV licence.
    According to the TV Licensing website a TV licence is required if a laptop is used to watch TV / BBC iPlayer if the laptop is ever powered from the mains. A laptop that can be powered temporarily from its battery whilst being powered from the mains at other times does not meet the requirement to have "TV receiving equipment that is powered solely by its own internal batteries".

    Does anyone know if there is any legal precedent that covers this?

    Not as far as I know but I'd go with what the moneysavingexpert guide says:

    Trick for students to watch live telly and use iPlayer without a licence

    In some circumstances you won't need to get your own licence, even if you've moved into your own digs.

    It's a bizarre rule, but the TV Licensing website says you may be covered by your parents’ licence if:

    • Your 'out-of-term address' (your parents’ address) is covered by a TV Licence.
    • And you only use TV-receiving equipment that is powered solely by its own internal batteries.
    • And you have not connected it to an aerial or plugged it into the mains.

    This means students whose parents have a TV licence are fine to use BBC iPlayer and/or watch live television on a tablet, smartphone or laptop that's not charging at the time, without having to pay for their own licence (as long as that's your usual place of residence outside term time).

    However, if you're watching live TV or using BBC iPlayer on a desktop computer, games console or television/digital box, you will need a licence. Whether you need to get one yourself will depend on your accommodation though:

    • Halls of residence. If you're in halls of residence you'll probably be covered for communal areas but not your own room. Check with your university.
       

    • Private accommodation. If you're living out of halls in a shared house and have signed a joint tenancy agreement, you'll need only one licence for the household. However, if you have separate agreements you'll need one for your room.

  • Cornucopia
    Cornucopia Posts: 16,151 Forumite
    First Anniversary Name Dropper First Post Photogenic
    edited 6 October 2020 at 10:06PM
    Chino said:
    According to the TV Licensing website a TV licence is required if a laptop is used to watch TV / BBC iPlayer if the laptop is ever powered from the mains. A laptop that can be powered temporarily from its battery whilst being powered from the mains at other times does not meet the requirement to have "TV receiving equipment that is powered solely by its own internal batteries".

    This is not my understanding. 

    In terms of spotting the weasel-words in the TVL explanation, I'd say it is "TV receiving equipment".   This relates to the definition in the law of "Television Receiver" which is not simply a TV set, it is a TV (or other equipment) that is specifically installed for the purpose of receiving TV broadcasts (including concurrent streaming and iPlayer).

    I'm also always wary of interpretations that render the overall statement largely moot.   If you cannot use rechargable equipment (or you can only use it if the batteries are recharged by removing them), then why not say that?

    I always think that it's a shame that one of the World's biggest communications companies isn't better at communications - but there you go.
  • If in any doubt then surely the legal doctrine of Contra Proferentem would apply? (In essence, if there is any ambiguity in any term then meaning which favours the person who did not write the terms shall apply). :) 
Meet your Ambassadors

Categories

  • All Categories
  • 342.9K Banking & Borrowing
  • 250K Reduce Debt & Boost Income
  • 449.6K Spending & Discounts
  • 235K Work, Benefits & Business
  • 607.6K Mortgages, Homes & Bills
  • 172.9K Life & Family
  • 247.7K Travel & Transport
  • 1.5M Hobbies & Leisure
  • 15.9K Discuss & Feedback
  • 15.1K Coronavirus Support Boards