Martin Lewis: Working from home due to coronavirus, even for a day? Claim TWO years' worth of tax re

edited 13 April at 12:52PM in Martin's Blogs & Appearances & MoneySavingExpert in the News
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  • Tim11111000111Tim11111000111 Forumite
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    myuserid said:
    Like many, I'm new to claiming expenses for working at home, so have a few queries for anyone with a better understanding.
    1. I found the wording a little unclear in the blog post, so is it really the case that those with more generous employers (who are, frankly, less likely to be in need) can get £6/week, whereas everyone else can only get £1.20/week via a P87?
    2. Can the weeks at home due to COVID-19 prior to 6th April 2020 be claimed at a future date, together and in one go with the weeks/months after that date? or do the weeks prior have to be claimed now, i.e. at the end of this tax year?
    3. For those weeks prior is there any difference in how they are claimed? e.g. the sort of information asked for, the need for receipts, etc.
    Thanks in advance to anyone that can help answer these questions.


    1. Yes, unfortunately that's right.

    2. As I understand it yes, you can claim for multiple tax years in one go. So it's probably easiest to claim it all in one go once you're back to work normally.

    3. No - this tax relief isn't a coronavirus-specific thing (MSE is just highlighting it now as many more people are likely to be covered) so the documentation needed is the same. If you're claiming the £4/6 per week flat rate, that documentation is virtually nil.
  • Tim11111000111Tim11111000111 Forumite
    39 Posts
    Second Anniversary 10 Posts
    AgentOso1 said:
    I wonder if 2 people living at the same address can claim it?
    Yes, I think so. It might be more complicated if you want to claim anything above the £6/week flat rate.
  • myuseridmyuserid Forumite
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    MoneySaving Newbie
    myuserid said:
    Like many...
    1. Yes, unfortunately...
    Thanks
  • edited 4 April 2020 at 9:10AM
    zagfleszagfles Forumite
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    edited 4 April 2020 at 9:10AM
    So this only applies if my employer requires me to work from home?
    My employer does not require me to work from home, my workplace is open and available. Some people have to go in due to the nature of their job.
    But the government instructions are crystal clear, you can only travel into work if you cannot work from home. I can. So it is the government that is requiring me to work from home.
    Therefore are the government (through HMRC),  saying that it must be my employer that is requiring me to work from home, not the government themselves?
  • edited 4 April 2020 at 8:31PM
    anniecaveanniecave Forumite
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    edited 4 April 2020 at 8:31PM
    zagfles said:
    So this only applies if my employer requires me to work from home?
    My employer does not require me to work from home, my workplace is open and available. Some people have to go in due to the nature of their job.
    But the government instructions are crystal clear, you can only travel into work if you cannot work from home. I can. So it is the government that is requiring me to work from home.
    Therefore are the government (through HMRC),  saying that it must be my employer that is requiring me to work from home, not the government themselves?
    I understand your logic above. But your employer should be obeying the law by instructing their employees (including yourself) to obey the current legislation. And I assume they are doing so.
    So if your employer is instructing certain employees to work at a site location or travel as needed (because that is the only way the work can be done) then that is one option.
    Or if your employer is saying that certain work must be done at a site, and other work can be done from your homes, and instructing you do work in the relevant location as per government legislation (site if needed, home otherwise) that's also another option.
    Or if all your work can be done from home, and your employer (like my employer, and lots of others) has therefore told you to work from home, and that's what you are doing, like I also am doing, then you are working from home. 
    In any case, if you're working from home due to coronavirus, then the logic is still therefore that the working from home allowance or expenses claimable would apply in this case. 
    Indecision is the key to flexibility :)
  • zagfleszagfles Forumite
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    anniecave said:
    zagfles said:
    So this only applies if my employer requires me to work from home?
    My employer does not require me to work from home, my workplace is open and available. Some people have to go in due to the nature of their job.
    But the government instructions are crystal clear, you can only travel into work if you cannot work from home. I can. So it is the government that is requiring me to work from home.
    Therefore are the government (through HMRC),  saying that it must be my employer that is requiring me to work from home, not the government themselves?
    I understand your logic above. But your employer should be obeying the law by instructing their employees (including yourself) to obey the current legislation. And I assume they are doing so.
    So if your employer is instructing certain employees to work at a site location or travel as needed (because that is the only way the work can be done) then that is one option.
    Or if your employer is saying that certain work must be done at a site, and other work can be done from your homes, and instructing you do work in the relevant location as per government legislation (site if needed, home otherwise) that's also another option.
    Or if all your work can be done from home, and your employer (like my employer, and lots of others) has therefore told you to work from home, and that's what you are doing, like I also am doing, then you are working from home. 
    In any case, if you're working from home due to coronavirus, then the logic is still therefore that the working from home allowance or expenses claimable would apply in this case. 

    Yes I was probably reading too much into it, but the article does state "HMRC says it will consider claims from employees working at home due to coronavirus measures if their usual workplace is closed." Mine isn't. I think this should be clarified in the article. Or perhaps it can be interpreted as "if the usual workplace is closed to those who can/must work from home as required by law".
  • Traveller29Traveller29 Forumite
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    MoneySaving Newbie
    Hi, my wife's firm has instructed all those who can possibly work from should do so. To do this she has been told she has to buy a second computer monitor which she has to pay for herself. How can a claim be made from HMRC for this as well as the £6 p/w claim?
  • Luv_LeeLuv_Lee Forumite
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    First Post
    MoneySaving Newbie
    Are large employers legally obliged to pay the £6 p/w for working from home?  If so, do employees have to make a request to their employer or will the employer automatically include it in employee salaries?
  • MbjmnSmartMbjmnSmart Forumite
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    MoneySaving Newbie
    It's near the end of the Employment page(s).
    I've just logged in the HMRC account and tried to find the section on the submission for last year, but don't see anything.
    Where exacty is it please?
  • MbjmnSmartMbjmnSmart Forumite
    4 Posts
    First Post
    MoneySaving Newbie
    Where dos this get entered on the self-assessment form?
    I've tried looking in te Employment section and can only see a text box for any other information at the end, and I know this isn't the right place because I've tried in the past.
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