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Great Ways To Save Money And Turn Green Hunt

edited 30 November -1 at 1:00AM in Green & Ethical MoneySaving
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  • caroline1973leftycaroline1973lefty Forumite
    331 posts
    Part of the Furniture 100 Posts I've been Money Tipped!
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    Lidl's currently has hot water bottles for £1.99 (british standard certified, not with furry covers though) as well as cute little kids furry covered ones (would make a nice stocking filler?) for about the same price.

    lots of good tips here about heating costs. Remember the fossil fuel used in food is about a third of most people's 'carbon footprint'. Most of this is down to the fuel used for processing, transportation, and in oil and gas based fertilisers and pesticides. So if you buy local, seasonal, organic food and learn to cook (check out the old style board for brilliant suggestions), you can reduce that part of your carbon footprint by 75%, and it will be cheaper and healthier than relying on prepared food, too.

    One of the easiest ways to do this is by getting an organic box delivery - you automatically get seasonal, organic, mostly local fruit and veg (plus other groceries if you want, though a food co-op would be cheaper) delivered to your door for less money than you'd think (typically about £10pw for plenty for 1-2 people). The quality is a revelation, so you don't need to use lots of expensive other ingredients to make a delicious meal - even just simple soups, curries/stews, roast veg (yum...), stir-frys and salads become really tasty with this level of quality. Because you always have fresh food in the house, trips to the supermarket (temple of temptation) can be cut down or even cut out altogether. I used to use Abel & Cole but have now found a locally based scheme which is even better value.

    If anyone gets the chance, see 'The Power Of Community' - a film about how Cuba manages to sustain a high quality of life since their access to cheap Soviet oil was cut off - it is very inspiring! 80% of their agriculture is now organic and they are largely self-sufficient in food. they used permaculture principles, which brings me to my last point. it's been said already on the green board, but I'd encourage everyone to check out the permaculture association and permaculture magazine for courses - this is for those interested in sustainable design of gardens, homes, agriculture, etc, cheap low-tech solutions, using 'waste' as resources, etc, so it is very MSE-friendly!:D
    "The Earth provides enough to satisfy every man's need, but not every man's greed" - Ghandi
  • geordie_joegeordie_joe Forumite
    9.1K posts
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    One of the easiest ways to do this is by getting an organic box delivery - you automatically get seasonal, organic, mostly local fruit and veg

    Sounds a good idea, but "locally grown" always means a lot less choice. I can't find locally grown pomegranets, bananas, coconuts etc. anywhere near me.
    DPJames wrote: »
    You are never wrong about anything.
  • We certainly find that ordering through a food coop works for us with groceries. We order every month or so with 4 neighbours and can get larger sizes so have less packaging, the truck makes one delivery and on most items there are savings over what you would pay at the supermarket, it also allows us access to products that aren't available locally. For veg we use our local farm shop which also saves money, and again not lots of packaging. Not perfect but it saves money and perhaps means less road journeys and less packaging.
  • Lidl's currently has hot water bottles for £1.99 (british standard certified, not with furry covers though)

    That's a very good price for a hot water bottle, but are they the traditional rubber type, or one of the many cheap and nasty plastic ones which are now on the market? I just don't like plastic!
  • Add a water saver bag to your toilet cistern. These are often available free of charge from your local Water Authority. Failing that, fill a 1.5 litre bottle with sand and use that instead! Less water volume in the cistern, means less water being flushed and wasted.

    In the colder weather, it's better to wear several thinner layers of clothes (synthetic material or wool) than one or two thick layers. Body heat will become trapped between the layers and therefore can be sustained for longer.

    Also in the cold weather, try to fill your car up with petrol whilst the temperature is at its lowest. The pumps are calibrated by volume and when cold you get a tiny but more than during warmer temperatures.

    eBay - When looking for items on eBay, use the 'Advanced Search' tab to look for listings within a 10 mile radius of your postcode. If you win one of these auctions, you can then arrange to collect the item in person rather pay the p&p fees. It's usually best to check this with the seller first, but in my experience they tend to prefer a collection as saves them time on queing up at the Post Office. Happy Bidding!

    VM
    4 wheels drives a body, 2 wheels drives the soul! :cool:
  • PoppycatPoppycat Forumite
    19.9K posts
    Part of the Furniture
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    it wont work in all cisterns especially some more recent ones. My old toilet worked fine even a old plastic bottle filled with water did the trick. We moved house this year and new toilet cistern is terrible to flush without the water saver bag.
    valleymatt wrote: »
    Add a water saver bag to your toilet cistern. These are often available free of charge from your local Water Authority. Failing that, fill a 1.5 litre bottle with sand and use that instead! Less water volume in the cistern, means less water being flushed and wasted.

  • I didn't know that. Maybe a bit of trial and error then.....?

    VM
    4 wheels drives a body, 2 wheels drives the soul! :cool:
  • geordie_joegeordie_joe Forumite
    9.1K posts
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    Poppycat wrote: »
    it wont work in all cisterns especially some more recent ones. My old toilet worked fine even a old plastic bottle filled with water did the trick. We moved house this year and new toilet cistern is terrible to flush without the water saver bag.

    My new house is built with everything small. I tried to put a 1 pint milk bottle in the cistern and there was no room for it. To get it in I would have to remove the float.

    I am convinced that the cistern is smaller than normal ones, as is the loo.

    At the weekend I will siphon out the water and see how much the cistern holds, as I'm sure it is smaller than a normal one anyway.

    I put a blu-loo block in it this morning and have discovered that the cistern leaks into the bowl. I didn't notice it before, but since the water in the cistern turned blue I can see a thin stream of water running down the back of the bowl.

    It's about as much as if you turned a tap on just enough to create a continuous stream of water running from it.
    DPJames wrote: »
    You are never wrong about anything.
  • Hi Joe,

    Have you got a set of "French" style plumbing in you new home?

    Does the new leaking tank work on the syphon principle? ie when you twist the handle a plunger inside the tank lifts a large enough slug of water to create a siphon effect inside a hoop of tubing that feeds down into the pipe that connects to the pan? (Now tell me you have a "close coupled suite" - where the tank sits directly on top of the pan ?)

    Having a siphon, that kept flushing until the empty tank allowed air into the hoop and broke the siphon effect, used to be mandatory in this country BUT possibly because we are all citizens of the EU now, other technologies are allowed.

    Harry
  • geordie_joegeordie_joe Forumite
    9.1K posts
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    harryhound wrote: »
    Hi Joe,

    Have you got a set of "French" style plumbing in you new home?

    Does the new leaking tank work on the syphon principle? ie when you twist the handle a plunger inside the tank lifts a large enough slug of water to create a siphon effect inside a hoop of tubing that feeds down into the pipe that connects to the pan? (Now tell me you have a "close coupled suite" - where the tank sits directly on top of the pan ?)

    Having a siphon, that kept flushing until the empty tank allowed air into the hoop and broke the siphon effect, used to be mandatory in this country BUT possibly because we are all citizens of the EU now, other technologies are allowed.

    Harry

    Just been up to have a look. I don't know if it's french, but the lever lifts a plunger in a small "tower" and here is a large tower next to it. Didn't see any tubing but the water is blue so I may have missed it.

    The tank does sit on the back of the pan too.

    Between the float ball, tower and flushing mechanism there is not a gap big enough to squeeze a one pint milk bottle through.
    DPJames wrote: »
    You are never wrong about anything.
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