Fellow tradespeople - what do you think of this job?

It still has to be pointed, but I would be very keen to hear your comments on the quality of this brickwork.

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Everything that is supposed to be in heaven is already here on earth.
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Replies

  • phill99phill99 Forumite
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    Evidently done by the David Blunkett and Stevie Wonder Brickwork Company.

    Very poor quality. non-uniform spacing, twisted bricks, lack of 'plumbness'.

    I wouldn't be paying him.
    Eat vegetables and fear no creditors, rather than eat duck and hide.
  • Did you do it yourself . But may I add its as bad as the original in the side .
    :cool: hard as nails on the internet . wimp in the real world :cool:
  • PasturesNewPasturesNew Forumite
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    I'm replying because I dated a bricklayer for 3 years ... er, many years ago.

    To be honest, that's about as good as I think I'd manage to do if I ever got it into my head to build a brick wall .... although, actually, I'd stop after the second course and think "that's really not right" and keep working at it until I did get it right.

    It's wonky in more directions than there are directions.

    But is it structurally sound ....? I think, on the balance of probability, it probably is within limits..... but I'd not like to be sleeping in the room above that on a windy night :)

    I don't think pointing will make it look much better .... grow ivy over it or something :) Hanging basket, nobody will notice.
  • southcoastrgisouthcoastrgi Forumite
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    Hand made bricks ?
    I think it does exactly what it's designed to do & look, a feature & took a lot more work, not to everyone's taste but I think it's a good job
    I'm only here while I wait for Corrie to start.

    You get no BS from me & if I think you are wrong I WILL tell you.
  • edited 1 December 2015 at 4:56AM
    brightontravellerbrightontraveller Forumite
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    edited 1 December 2015 at 4:56AM
    It sort of matches existing is that what they were instructed to do?
    The existing wall it first pic looks like different bonds most would match in existing/extension etc or make it distinctively visually different e,g. render, different material etc (although that depends on architect, clients etc wishes)

    Bricks look like misshapes, handmade etc? Visually not great but neither is existing wall, If they were after all straight uniformed look then type of brick used was wrong it wouldn't give that look and wouldn't go with existing either? Personally it looks like lot of work, but little thought given? Might look better pointed ?
  • DavesnaveDavesnave Forumite
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    I agree with those saying it seems to be deliberate to match existing.
  • andyhopandyhop Forumite
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    Matches existing , corners look dead level , arch looks good too

    What did you ask for?
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  • MisterBaxterMisterBaxter Forumite
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    Once it's pointed and weathered a bit it will 'sort' of match with the existing, which isn't great in itself; hopefully that was the look they were going for. If it could have been 'toothed' in it may have looked more like it was original and would have perhaps been less noticeable. As they have built it with a very clear break I'm not sure that it was really necessary to try and match the bond (if you can call it that), it could have just been done in the same colour/pattern of brick and pointing as it will always look like an add-on.

    If Building Control are happy to sign it off from a structural point of view and you are happy with the overall look why worry.
  • FurtsFurts Forumite
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    Come on Doozergirl, you are teasing and testing us all! You have not given the full picture here and you know it.

    The brickwork has not been pointed. Since all bricklaying is jointed and pointed as work progresses this suggests either there was a significant problem like incorrect mortar, or this was an existing job that has been raked out for re-pointing. If the former then knock it down if it is structurally unsuitable because of incorrect strength mortar. If the latter then all the posts about not paying the bricklayer do not apply.

    Structurally you know the answers. Is the left hand corner tied into the structure? The photo does not show this. The right hand appears to be a straight joint, so how is this tied if at all? This is a concern. Equally is the arch bearing onto the right hand side and what weight is being carried from above. Again your photo does not show this.

    The replies refer to Building Control being happy and signing it off. That is fine but we both know the Duty Of Care lies with you. As a simple guide you will have access to NHBC Technical Standards to get a feel for such situations!

    But well done for keeping us all on our toes.
  • MisterBaxterMisterBaxter Forumite
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    Furts wrote: »
    Come on Doozergirl, you are teasing and testing us all! You have not given the full picture here and you know it.

    The brickwork has not been pointed. Since all bricklaying is jointed and pointed as work progresses this suggests either there was a significant problem like incorrect mortar, or this was an existing job that has been raked out for re-pointing. If the former then knock it down if it is structurally unsuitable because of incorrect strength mortar. If the latter then all the posts about not paying the bricklayer do not apply.

    Structurally you know the answers. Is the left hand corner tied into the structure? The photo does not show this. The right hand appears to be a straight joint, so how is this tied if at all? This is a concern. Equally is the arch bearing onto the right hand side and what weight is being carried from above. Again your photo does not show this.

    The replies refer to Building Control being happy and signing it off. That is fine but we both know the Duty Of Care lies with you. As a simple guide you will have access to NHBC Technical Standards to get a feel for such situations!

    But well done for keeping us all on our toes.

    You could be right but if you click on the photo and then enlarge it the joints look very clean so don't look like they've been raked out; could be that a coloured mortar is going to be used for pointing. You're right that you can't see how it's been tied in to the existing even when the image is enlarged but if it has been signed off then I'm assuming a mechanical fixing has been used to tie in to comply with Building Regs. It's hard to see from the image how the arch has been built but I am guessing a self supporting arch former, again if is has been through building control they would have checked this. If you look at the bottom of the two images it looks like there is the roof overhang so single storey so almost no weight on the arch; although not certain as this could be temporary decking.

    NHBC Technical standards - isn't that just a case of opening up your chequebook and getting the certificate or is that just me being very cynical again?

    You're right the duty of care rests with the builder but building control aren't going to sign off unless you have proven that what has actually been built complies with the regs; as we know they aren't concerned about aesthetics though.

    Possibly missing the point completely though as I think the question was more to do with the way the brickwork looked from an aesthetic point of view.

    More interested in knowing what bond that brickwork is, or is supposed to be. I don't recognise it from my studies (although that was many years ago).
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